Vortex Tubes: What is a Cold Fraction?

Have you ever needed a source of cold air but don’t want to invest in a costly chiller? INTRODUCING Vortex Tubes! Vortex Tubes use compressed air and contain no moving parts to create a cold and hot stream of air from either end of the device. Using the valve located on the hot stream a vortex tube can achieve temperatures as low as -50°F (-46°C) and temperatures as high as 260°F (127°C).

When the vortex tube is supplied with compressed air the air flow is directed into the generator that causes spin into a spiraling vortex at around 1,000,000 rpm. This spinning vortex flows down the neck and wall of the hot tube. The control valve located on the end of the hot tube allows a fraction of the hot air to escape and what does not escape reverses direction and travels back down the center of the tube and exhausts out of the cold end. Inside of the low-pressure area of the larger outer warm air vortex, the inner vortex loses heat as it flows back to the cold end of the vortex and as it exits the vortex expels cold air. The absolute temperature drop that occurs during this process is going to be controlled by the cold fraction of the Vortex Tube and the supply pressure.

The brass screw used to control the cold fraction of a vortex tube

The cold fraction is defined as the amount of the inlet supply air that will exit out of the cold end of the vortex tube. An example would be if I had 10 SCFM supplied to a vortex tube with 60% cold fraction, then 6 SCFM would be exiting the cold discharge. Cold based on the amount of air you allow out of the hot end of the vortex tube you can control the temperature drop of the cold air. A smaller cold fraction which only allows a small amount of air to exit the cold discharge will result in a larger temperature drop; and vise versa a larger cold fraction will result in a much smaller temperature drop.

Table the shows the temperature drop and rise in correlation with the cold fraction and pressure

Here a EXAIR we have designed our vortex tubes to operate optimally at both a high cold fraction and a low cold fraction. The 32XX series designed to give you the best refrigeration, which means it will work well for cold fractions ~60% – 80%. This will give you a smaller temperature drop with more air flow which allows you to keep things cool much easier. This contrasts with the 34XX series which is designed more optimal performance at lower temperatures; this means the optimal cold fraction would be ~20% to 40%. Cold fractions this low will produce very little air flow but the temperature will be very cold (as low as -50°F). This is useful if you need to get an item down to a very low temperature.

If you have any questions about compressed air systems or want more information on any of EXAIR’s products, give us a call, we have a team of Application Engineers ready to answer your questions and recommend a solution for your applications.

Cody Biehle
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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Are EXAIR’s Hoses and Tubes Right For You?

Are you tired of ducking and dodging hard pipe everywhere? Do you need something more mobile for your compressed air? Then EXAIR Hoses and Tubes might be a solution for you. EXAIR offers a variety of hoses and tubes in different styles designed to work with our products without affecting performance. These products simplify the use, setup, and integration of our various products into your process. Normally if you were to buy hoses you would need to determine the proper diameters, pressure ratings, and/or end fittings to best fit the item in use. This is all unnecessary when purchasing EXAIR’s Hoses and tubes for EXAIR products since everything is sized and properly rated to be used with our products. So, ask our Application Engineers if EXAIR Hoses and Tubes are right for you.

 Products may include the following.

Line Vac air operated conveyor hose
Conveying Hoses:

These hoses are used with our Air Operated Conveyors or Line Vacs which are used to convey material from point A to point B. The hose can be mounted on either side of the Line Vac using the properly sized hose clamp that comes with it. The Conveyance hose is made out of a durable PVC semi-flexible material in sizes from ¾” I.D. to 3” I.D. to match our Line Vac sizes. They also come in lengths up to 50’ in increments of 10’.

Coiled hose
Coiled Hoses:

When it comes to getting compressed air to our safety air guns, we offer a series of abrasion-resistant nylon Coiled Hoses. The coiled hose comes in a 12’ long length and comes in 3 sizes; these sizes are 1/8” NPT, ¼” NPT, and 3/8” NPT to attach right to EXAIR’s Safety Air Guns. The hoses also include swivel fittings to make for easier uncoiling. The coiled design makes it easy to reach around the work area and retract back to the substation. With the right size hose Coiled Hoses can supply the required amount of compressed air with minimal amount of pressure drop.

Compressed air hose
Compressed Air Hoses:

Compressed Air Hose can be used to reach equipment from overhead or near equipment. These hoses are made with synthetic rubber and comes in 3/8” I.D. and ½” I.D… Lengths up to 50’ long can be provided and the hoses are rated for up to 250 psig air pressure. These hoses can provide lasting protection from ozone, weathering and temperatures up to 158oF. They also come with two male ends in ¼” NPT or ½” NPT.

Stay Set Hoses
Stay Set Hoses:

Bendable and flexible, the stay set hose allows for manual positioning of your compressed air product. Equipped with “memory” function, the hose will not creep or droop until it is physically moved. The Stay Set Hose comes in lengths from 6” to 36” in length, and they offered in a combination of 1/8” and ¼” MNPT connections. These hoses are rated for 250 psig and are made of a reinforced rubber.

E-Vac Tubing

Vacuum Tubing:

When it comes down to our E-Vac product line, EXAIR offers vacuum tubing to be used along with the unit. This tubing is made from polyurethane and comes in 1/8” O.D. and 3/8” O.D. up to 50’ in length in increments of 10’.

If you have any questions about compressed air systems or want more information on any of EXAIR’s products, give us a call, we have a team of Application Engineers ready to answer your questions and recommend a solution for your applications.

Cody Biehle
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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Tried and True Products with Modern Performance and Safety Features

Over Labor Day I got the chance to take my dad and his friend climbing in Seneca Rocks West Virginia for the first time in a very long time. Seneca Rocks is a large Quartzite knife edge located in the Monongahela National forest on route 33. The majority of climbing there is what is known as Trad Climbing, which is just short for traditional climbing and is where one must place their own protection to clip the rope into (also pray it holds when you fall). Trad climbing requires a strong mental fortitude and precise physical movements as you jam different parts of your body into various sized cracks.

Me on the left and my Dad’s friend at the trail head for the hike to “the walls”.

In the ever-expanding world of new technology and advancements of outdoor adventure gear, all trad climbers stick with the same gear that was used some 30+ years ago. Although the materials and performance have improved the very principle and mechanics behind them has not. In this case the old saying “If it ain’t broke don’t fix it!” rings true. Sometimes when it comes to a solution, whether its hanging 200’ in the air or updating a process line, traditional is a great choice due to its simplicity and effectiveness.

Compressed air has been around since 1799 but the idea has been around since 3rd Century B.C. making it one of the oldest utilities next to running water. When it comes to manufacturing applications it’s about as tried and true as you can get, so why not look into our engineered products to help you solve your issues. Their simplicity and effectiveness remain, while their efficiency, safety and performance have been engineered to modern day needs.  These modern needs have insisted that products be safer and more efficient then they were 30+ years ago.  

One example of this is EXAIR’s Vortex Tube. Vortex tubes where discovered in 1931 and were exposed to industrial manufacturing in 1945. EXAIR improved upon them when the company began in 1983. Today they are still used for various cooling applications such as replacing mist coolant on CNC machines, cooling down plastic parts during ultrasonic welding, and keeping electrical cabinets cool so they don’t overheat.

Another example is air nozzles, nozzles are used for many different purposes like cleaning or cooling parts. If you are using nozzles from 30 years ago because they are effective, there is a good chance you can improve you r efficiency and increase safety for your personnel with EXAIR’s engineered Super Air Nozzles. They are designed in a variety of styles to fit your needs from tiny micro nozzles to massive cluster nozzles to blow off or cool  a multitude of parts and processes. 

Sub-zero air flow with no moving parts. 3400 Series Vortex Tubes from EXAIR.

If you have any questions about compressed air systems or want more information on any of EXAIR’s products, give us a call, we have a team of Application Engineers ready to answer your questions and recommend a solution for your applications.

Cody Biehle
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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Sliding Vane Compressors: How they Work

When it comes to air compressors there are many different types to choose from. Each compressor performs differently and have their own benefits and downfalls. In this case we will be taking a look a Sliding Vane Compressor which is a positive-displacement compressor. Positive-displacement type compressors have a given amount of air or gas that gets trapped in a compression chamber. From there the volume of that air is mechanically reduced causing an increase in the pressure. Sliding vane compressors use a circular stator that is housed in a cylindrical rotor; the rotor contains radially positioned slots where the vanes reside. These vanes are what create the compression in the “cells”.

Diagram of a sliding vane compressor

The inlet port on the system is positioned in a way that allows the air flow into each cell, optimizing the amount of air that each cell can hold. Once the air enters the system the cell size is reduced down farther and farther as rotation continues and each vane is pushed back into its original slot in the rotor. Compression will continue until each cell reaches the discharge port. One of the more common forms of a sliding vane compressor is the lubricant injected variety. These compressors inject a lubricant into the chamber to lubricate the walls and the vanes; this removes the heat of compression, as well as provide a seal on the cell. These air compressors are generally sold in a 10 – 200 HP range with capacities running between 40 – 800 acfm.

Advantages of a lubricant injected sliding-vane compressor include:

  • Compact size
  • Relatively low purchase cost
  • Vibration-free operation does not require special foundations
  • Routine maintenance includes lubricant and filter changes

Some of the disadvantages that come with this type of compressor:

  • Less efficient than the rotary screw type
  • Lubricant carryover into the delivered air will require proper maintenance of an oil-removal filtration system
  • Will require periodic lubricant changes

If you have any questions about compressed air systems or want more information on any of EXAIR’s products, give us a call, we have a team of Application Engineers ready to answer your questions and recommend a solution for your applications.

Cody Biehle
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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Photo Credit to Compressed Air Challenge Handbook