EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems Stabilize Relative Humidity

EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems are able to cool your electrical panels using only clean, dry compressed air. Other systems such as cooling fans or heat exchangers use ambient air full of dust and humidity. The temperature of ambient air also fluctuates with the seasons and will be very warm in the summer months, which degrades their ability to cool as the temperature rises. One of the myths about compressed air cooling is that humidity from the compressed air source will enter the cabinet. A water/dirt filter separator will prevent condensate from entering the cabinet and since relative humidity is carried away with the hot air exhaust, relative humidity will stabilize to 45%. This video shows how quickly EXAIR’s Cabinet Cooler Systems will have an effect on relative humidity.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
@EXAIR_DW
DaveWoerner@EXAIR.com

Reliability – EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems Have It

Today, I’m working on a informal video for you our lovely readers, and the video editing software can be quite cumbersome on the old CPU. I’m reminded of the old joke about Bill Gates and GM. Bill Gates says, “If Microsoft built a car it would cost $25 and get 1,000 miles to a gallon.” The executive of GM reads this in the paper and issues the following Press statement. “If GM developed technology like Microsoft, the car would crash twice a day.” All I have to say to either company is now I drive to work with a bad tire sensor in my car and every time I try and edit a video, I see a blue screen and need to reboot.

*Fine Print: I drive a car made in Korea and edit video with a software company other than Microsoft. The joke is just a joke not a reflection on either Microsoft or GM.

Today I wish I had a product that worked great everyday that I needed it. A product that require very little maintenance and I could count on to work right the first time every time. Something time tested, easy to install and innovative. I know of a product with these criteria – A Cabinet Cooler System – which is used to keep the internal temperature of your electrical cabinets at an optimal working temperature when dealing with components which heat the inside or when seasonal temperature increases cause additional internal heat buildup.

Cabinet Cooler Family
Cabinet Cooler Family (From Left To Right Small NEMA 12 Cabinet Cooler, Large NEMA 12 Cabinet Cooler, or Large NEMA 4X Cabinet Cooler)

A Cabinet Cooler is Vortex Tube based cooling product that runs on compressed air. The Cabinet Cooler Systems can cool up to 5,600 BTU/Hr. It has no moving parts to wear out. It will lower your compressed air temperature by 50 degrees F. The cabinet cooler also creates a positive pressure on the cabinet to prevent dust from entering the cabinet. We have varieties of NEMA 12 units to resist dust and oil intrusion and NEMA 4 units that resist, water, dust and oil intrusion. NEMA 4X units combat corrosion, water, dust and oil. The Cabinet Cooler Systems are versatile compressed air coolers that will work in harsh conditions.

The alternative to cabinet coolers have a variety of problems. During the heat of the summer fans are only able to pull in hot, humid, and dirty air. The hot plant air does not have the same cooling ability as cool winter air. In a dirty environment the fans must be filtered to prevent dust and dirt building up inside the cabinet preventing heat transfer. The motors on fans will need to be replaced. Air Conditioners have don’t rely on the ambient air temperature, but dust and dirt are pulled into their filters which can clog and lead to costly maintenance or replacement. Cabinet Coolers have no moving parts and don’t really on ambient temperature, so they are a much better system for hot, industrial environments.

EXAIR offers an online sizing guide for your convenience. Fill one out today, so you can avoid costly repairs on your electronic equipment.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
@EXAIR_DW
DaveWoerner@EXAIR.com

Escape to the Hills

I’m leaving for a short three day vacation this week in Hocking Hills. This is my biannual family reunion of my Great Grandfather’s family the Trouts. This will be our 7th or 8th trip down there, and I still have yet to go hiking at Old Man’s Cave, the local tourist attraction. I have always stuck closer to the pool and the golf course and away from the trail. Russ Bowman puts me to shame. He heads up there every year with his boys to go hiking and camping, and we tend to stay at a cabin which is more like a hotel with some wood paneling. To each their own.

For my parent’s generation the reunion is a chance to catch up with cousins that they spent summers with growing up. For my generation, it is a chance to meet and reconnect with our second cousins that we normally would only see at weddings and funerals. The three day reunion allows a longer more free flowing opportunity to see who people are. It is a different perceptive to get to know people that have a lot of history in common, but you only see once in a while. Most of the weekend is amazingly unscheduled, so you can come and go as you please.

This will be different for me. I’m taking my son who was born last August to meet his third cousins. It is different for a couple reasons. First, now I don’t just have to worry how I behave at the family reunion. I have to make sure my son doesn’t head-butt the other babies like he has been known to do at day care. Second, my family gets to see him grow up and learn stories about me when I was his age through the eyes of the people that were there and knew me best. I hope they stay away from a few stories until he is older, but probably not.

Getting together with the family reminds me of working here at EXAIR. As we witnessed with the Professor’s departure, and Dear Joe’s departure we see that some people might chose to not come into work everyday anymore, but they are always a member of our community. As time passes we are constantly reminded of their impact. With the Professor’s message we constantly drive to safe customers compressed air energy, and Joe always reminded us that we are here for the customer first, and if you can, help them in any way you should.

But, of course, the messages from those two individuals are the result of EXAIR’s company culture, our product’s ability to solve customer problems, and EXAIR’s commitment to customer service.

Contact an Application Engineer today to join our family of customers.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
@EXAIR_DW
DaveWoerner@EXAIR.com

Beat the Heat: Cold Gun Air Coolant Systems Extend Tool Life with No Messy Coolant

In most drilling, machining, and cutting operations a flood of coolant is used to remove heat from the work piece and the tool. This coolant is sprayed, and after it impacts the tool or part it sprays everywhere. In some case there is no way around using coolant due to required cutting speed, specific heat of the part, or the need for lubrication. In other applications coolant is prohibited from touching the work piece due to application requirement. This means that the tool and the work piece operate at a higher temperature and could damage the tool or work piece.

Cold Gun
Cold Gun, Model Number 5315, In Use

EXAIR Cold Gun Air Coolant System drop the temperature of compressed air by 50 degrees Fahrenheit. This air is then blown on a tool and work piece to take way most of the heat generated during machining. Used in combination with a tool that can handle a higher temperature like a high performance carbide the Cold Gun can deliver reliable machining without the mess of coolant.

Normally in dry machining you also loss coolant’s ability to clear chips from the work area. These chips can trap heat and further increase the temperature of the work area. The chips will also work harden with repeated cutting causing more wear on the tool and a bad surface finish on the part. With a flood of coolant the chips are washed away, but with dry machining air must be used to clear the work area. EXAIR 5315 Standard Cold Gun features (2) 1″ wide nozzle that can be used to cool and the produce enough air flow to prevent chip build up. If you are looking for more information on dry machining, Brian Boswell wrote a thesis on the topic.

Dry machining doesn’t just replicate the machining with a flood coolant it can improve the process. Extended exposure to airborne lubrication mists present potential health risks to machinists. Coolant is becoming more expensive to dispose of after it has been used this is only going to increase over time as environmental regulation become greater. Removing the coolant from your process can ease your environmental impact while still maintaining the quality machining your customers require.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
@EXAIR_DW
DaveWoerner@EXAIR.com