Super Air Amplifiers for Cooling Injection Mold

When working with a cooling application, many customers will immediately look to the Vortex Tube and Cold Gun product lines. While this may be the best solution for some applications with smaller areas to cool, cold air from a Vortex tube based solution is not the best method for large parts or larger areas that exceed a footprint of approximately 2″ x 2″. For larger areas, we have other options for many cooling applications. EXAIR’s Super Air Amplifiers and Super Air Knives are also very effective at reducing the temperature of a part without requiring cold air.

Cooling is a relative concept based on the starting and finishing temperature. What feels “cool” to a human being does not necessarily mean the same thing as “cooling” a part or material. Due to the ability of the Super Air Knives and Super Air Amplifiers to entrain large amounts of ambient temperature air, we can move a lot of air volume across the surface of the target part and quickly lower the temperature.

A simple example I like to use is blowing on a hot cup of coffee just as its been brewed. The temperature of the air coming from your mouth is around 98.6°F, the same as your body temperature. Coffee can be as hot as 185°F when fresh. Due to the temperature differential between your breath and the hot coffee, we’re able to achieve a reasonable amount of cooling just by simply blowing across the surface. Typically, when the target temperature of the part or material needs to be around ambient temperature or higher; the best solution for cooling is going to be either a Super Air Amplifier or Super Air Knife.

Rob's I phone 877

EXAIR 5015 Cold Gun

To illustrate the above concept even more, recently I was working with a customer that needed to cool a silicon injection mold. The mold had two sides and the customer was looking for a method of cooling it down between cycles. The mold cavity surface was approximately 400°F and they wanted to get it down to around 150°F. They were familiar with the EXAIR Cold Gun as they use them across their facility in various secondary or post-molding drilling operations. They had a spare and decided to hook it up and blow the cold air across the face of the mold to see what happens. The volume of air from the Cold Gun was not enough to sufficiently cool the entire mold, so he reached out to EXAIR for assistance.

Based on the dimensions of the mold and understanding the target temperature to be 150°F, we settled on a system of (2) 120224 4” Super Air Amplifier Kits. One was placed above each side of the mold. As soon as the mold opened, they activated the Super Air Amplifiers and were able to pull the surface temperature of the mold down to an acceptable level. Time is money in any manufacturing operation. Companies that produce injection molded parts will look for any way to improve their process. By implementing a procedure to cool the mold more quickly, they are able to boost their productivity gains and become more profitable.

The Super Air Amplifier Kit comes with an Auto-Drain Filter to keep the air clean and dry, a pressure regulator to allow you to dial in the precise level of airflow, and a shim set that allows you to make gross adjustments to the flow. The Super Air Amplifier is available in (5) different sizes with ¾” up to 8” diameter outlets and flow rates from 219 SCFM to 9,000 SCFM 6″ from the outlet. They are capable of achieving an amplification ratio of up to 25:1 from the compressed air supply. The laminar airflow from the unit minimizes wind shear to produce sound levels that are typically three times quieter than other air movers. If you have an application that requires a similar type of cooling, give us a call. We’ll walk you through the process of selecting the most suitable solution.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer

E-mail: Tylerdaniel@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

EXAIR E-Vac For Degassing

Recently a new application using the EXAIR E-Vacs has arisen. This is not a pick and place or system bleeding application. This is an application that some may not realize there is a need for. This is a degassing operation, the purpose is to remove any and all gas from a liquid or any viscous fluid.  A picture of some silicon mold resin during the degassing process is shown below.

I recently encountered this through the molding of acrylic.  In order to get a good finish part that is not going to have air bubbles in it you need to degas the liquid resin before it is poured into the mold.  Depending on what you’re mold is made out of you may even need to degas it.   In the instance I worked with a mold, it was made from silicon.  This meant the resin for the mold needed to be degassed as did the acrylic resin after the mold was formed and being used.

To degas you need a container that will withstand vacuum being pulled on it.   Then you simply set your container of liquid resin inside the “degassing chamber” and seal it up.  All you need is a vacuum port to hook the E-Vac to and you’re up and running.   You will actually be able to see the bubbles coming to the top of the resin.  In some cases it may even appear to fill the bucket.

If you would like to discuss  a similar application or have any questions about how you can use an E-Vac, feel free to contact an Application Engineer.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

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