EXAIR Webinar 11/7/18 2pm EDT: Understanding Static Electricity

Halloween has passed, temperatures are dropping, and you’ve had enough of constantly raking up leaves. It’s clear to everyone that summer is over (much to my dismay). As temperatures decline, so too does the amount of moisture in the air. As this happens, issues related to static electricity begin to increase. If you’ve ever walked across a carpeted surface, only to be shocked as soon as you touch a doorknob, you’re familiar with the effects of static electricity. In addition to painful shocks, static can contribute to a variety of problems within industrial processes.

We’ve talked here on the EXAIR blog about several of these different applications. Some examples include: removing static on plastic packaging, stopping dust from clinging to product, or aiding in part removal in an injection molding application. These types of applications can certainly occur year-round, but the absence of humid conditions dramatically increases the potential for them to occur.

summer static
In this photo, a static charge present causes the plastic particles to cling to the end of a suction wand.

They key to combating static electricity is first understanding how it it’s generated and how to test for it. To help you gain some more knowledge about static electricity and the problems it can cause, EXAIR is hosting a FREE webinar this week. Within this webinar you’ll learn how to identify a static charge, the series of events that are causing the charge, as well as various ways to eliminate this nuisance.

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Brian Farno, EXAIR’s Application Engineering Manager, will be conducting the webinar at 2:00 ET on 11/7/18. Immediately following the presentation will also be a brief Q&A. If you can’t attend, don’t let that stop you from registering! A link to view a recorded version of the webinar will go out to all registered participants whether you’re able to attend live or not.

Click here to register and view details on this upcoming webinar. Make sure you’re educated on the issues associated with static electricity before it’s too late!

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@exair.com
Twitter : @EXAIR_TD

A Unique Application for the Ultrasonic Leak Detector

Here on the EXAIR blog we post a ton of different applications for our products. We typically see similar applications each day and write about them so that you may identify potential points in your various processes that may benefit from an engineered compressed air solution. Many of these are typical blowoff or cooling applications that we see day in and day out. Sometimes, though, we see some applications that are outside the realm of typical operation. This can sometimes require the manufacturing of a specialized part or just getting a little creative with a stock product.

Our distributor in Argentina recently contacted me about a unique application for an Ultrasonic Leak Detector. The Model 9061 Ultrasonic Leak Detector is a hand-held instrument that allows you to locate costly leaks in a compressed air distribution system. As pressurized air exits a small orifice, an ultrasonic sound that is above human hearing is created. The Ultrasonic Leak Detector is able to pick up on these sound emissions and can convert it to an audible range that is able to be heard by the human ear. Typically, this product is used in conjunction with a leak prevention program to help save money and compressed air by identifying leaks in the distribution system.

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Model 9061 ULD detecting a leak

The customer is a manufacturer of plastic bottles used to hold a wide variety of different personal care products. The bottles were molded in two separate pieces, then brought together and sealed. After the two pieces of the bottle were sealed, they had to test each one to ensure that they remained watertight. Their current method involved filling the cavities with water and inspecting for leaks.

While this method was effective, when a leak was present water would get all over the machine and floor and needed to be cleaned up. This to them was considered a nuisance and they began to explore alternative methods of checking the seals on the bottles. They found EXAIR’s Ultrasonic Leak Detector and wondered if they could use it to detect leaks on the bottles if they were to pressurize them with compressed air instead of filling them with water. We’ve handled similar applications in the past, this one here a customer used the ULD to detect leaks from poor welds on the roof of buses. They ordered one for testing and were very pleased with the results. The ULD had no problem detecting leaks in the bottles and allowed them to eliminate the mess and annoyance associated with using water.

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Operator testing for leaks using the ULD

Just because you can’t find a particular application in our Application Database on the website or here on the blog, doesn’t mean that it can’t be done! With our unconditional 30 day guarantee for all stock products you have plenty of time to test it out in your specific application. If for any reason it won’t work for you, just send it back and we’ll try something else.

If you have a unique application that could be served by an Intelligent Compressed Air Product, give us a call. Trust me when I say we absolutely LOVE tackling a new and exciting challenge with a creative solution!

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Super Air Knife Improves Plastic Injection Molder Process

EXAIR commonly works with plastic injection molding companies. They produce top quality plastic parts from both commodity and engineering-grade resins for many diverse industries. The customer reached out to us with a problem. A mold that they were running was having some issues. The parts were not releasing and ejecting properly, causing the need to use a mold release, which was slowing down the process by a manual operation to the process.  Also, the parts were seeing push pin marks, causing cosmetic issues with the parts.  The customer wanted to explore using compressed air to blow the parts free.

Plastic Injection Mold
Typical Plastic Injection Mold

Based on the mold size and layout, a pair of 12″ Super Air Knives was installed.  The knives are oriented to blow straight down along the face of the mold, one knife per part tree.  The strong laminar flow of air hits the parts causing them to release and drop without the use of release agents.  Also, the push pin marks are within normal standards, eliminating the the cosmetic concerns.

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This is just one example of how intelligently using compressed air can help improve a process.  By using air knives for wide areas or using a 1″ Flat Super Air Nozzle for very small parts, or anywhere in between, we can help to solve your part ejection issues and make your process run better, faster, and with higher quality.

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1″ Flat Super Air Nozzle with Changeable Shims

If you would like to talk about Super Air Knives, Flat Nozzles or any of the EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air® Products, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or one of our Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

Send me an email
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Twitter: @EXAIR_BB

 

Injection Mold Photo – “Creative Commons Injection Mold” by Mitch Barrie is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

2.5″ Line Vac Used In Plastic Part Recovery

I recently worked with an OEM who designed an injection molding machine for their customer. In their design, after the polypropylene parts are formed, they pass through a punch process which creates a scrap piece roughly 1-3/4″ in diameter and 6mm thick but it is very light in weight. The end user was looking for a way to recover these parts in an effort to reduce the amount of waste material in the process but needed an automated solution so they didn’t have to dedicate an operator to manually recover the parts and dump them in the recycle bin. The recovery bin is located close to 25 feet away on the other side of the machining area.

After further discussion,  I recommended they incorporate our Model # 6085 2-1/2″ aluminum Line Vac into their design. The 2.5″ Line Vac has a 2.25″ inside throat diameter which could easily pass the parts and convey them to the collection hopper.

Line Vacs connect to standard ID hose or pipe to create a powerful in-line conveyor

With the recovery bin being located outside of the processing area, they were going to have to run the discharge piping up and over the machines so they were needing something flexible to do so. In addition to the Line Vac, I suggested they use a 30′ section of our 2.5″ conveyance hose. Our conveyance hose is constructed of a durable, clear reinforced PVC, ideal for most general applications and we offer it in 10′ lengths up to 50′, in diameters of 3/8″ to 3″ ID.

Flexible clear PVC hose with smooth bore eliminates material build up.

 

When it comes to moving dry material, like small plastic parts or more abrasive materials like steel shot blasting media, the Line Vacs are the perfect, maintenance-free solution as they have no moving parts or motors to wear out. For help selecting the best option to fit your needs or to discuss how another product might be suitable for your application, give us a call.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN