EXAIR Sells Internationally Through Distributors As Well as Factory Direct

Many folks who live in countries other than the US, probably see EXAIR Marketing campaigns as they pop up on their e-mails, social media and various web sites that are involved in our promotions. Perhaps they are interested, perhaps not. In any event, how do you go about finding out who to contact to buy EXAIR products around the world?

We have an answer to that. There are two ways in which a prospective customer can find out whether they work through a local distributor or with EXAIR directly. The first step is to log onto www.exair.com and click on the “International” button at the top right hand part of the screen. There are a few quick questions to answer, but then you have access to our International Distributor Search Map.  The map is a Google maps based tool that we have generated to allow our customers to find out who sells the product in their area. Simply click on the map for your region of the world and locate the closest EXAIR flag and click on it to get direct access to our distributors.

map

If for some reason you cannot use the map to find a distributor or perhaps there is no distributor for your area, you can contact our International Application Engineering and Sales Department. Our contacts are given below:

 

 

Contact info

John Ball, Lee Evans and Neal Raker are here to answer your Application Engineering questions, refer you to the correct distributor, help with pricing and make commercial offers for those with whom we can work on factory direct basis.

It is our sincere hope that all folks from around the world feel welcomed to contact with us at EXAIR so we may help with your productivity and air savings applications.

Neal Raker
Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com

Nice & New FAQs

In Russ Bowman’s most recent blog, More Power? I DO Think So…, he mentioned several key questions that an EXAIR Application Engineer will ask whenever we are troubleshooting a compressed air application that is not performing to the standards needed.    The blog talks about very common questions that we will ask customers when they call in with an existing compressed air application.   He then goes on to explain the usefulness of how many of the EXAIR products are adjustable using shims which are more often than not, patented.

Knowledge Base

EXAIR’s Knowledge Base is a wealth of knowledge.

 

Answers to questions that we frequently get from customers, on almost every single product we offer are all available for free, without even having to call, write, or tweet an Application Engineer. In the EXAIR Knowledge Base we offer a full section on FAQs.   This section is broken into each product category, and contains a wealth of information.  Most of these answers can also be found within our full catalog but we have streamlined to the most commonly asked questions in the FAQ section.

All of the product categories have even been recently revised to include questions for our products that have been released throughout the year.   There are now questions that have answer for the 108″ Super Air Knife, High Lift Reversible Drum Vac, and even PEEK Super Air Nozzles.   We will also continue to expand this section of our website to include any new products and or questions that start to arise.  So if you have a question that you don’t see on there, let us know and you just might see it get posted.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

 

Liquid Atomizing Nozzle Used To Mark Furniture During Production

EXAIR Atomizing Nozzle

EXAIR Atomizing Nozzle mounted and ready for air and liquid supply.

A major furniture manufacturer recently developed a need to replace an outdated spraying system with an efficient, engineered solution.  The need was to mark a production piece as it travels from one process to the next along a linear conveyor.  At intermittent points in the conveyor there is an opening through which liquid can be sprayed, but the opening is small and the available time is short.

The photo above shows the mounted nozzle awaiting final connection to air and liquid supply lines.  The pressure of these supply lines, combined with the fine tuning of the needle valve (top center of the Atomizing Nozzle) allow the liquid flow of the application to be dialed in to precisely the right point.  (Note that the photo has been rotated 180° and the nozzle actually sprays liquid upward.  EXAIR Atomizing Nozzles can be installed in any orientation.)

This application, with limited space and instantaneous or near-instantaneous liquid spray needs, is a great fit for an EXAIR Atomizing Nozzle.

Fast delivery, and precision control are two of the biggest advantages to using an engineered solution.  If you have an application in need of an atomized liquid spray, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

Happy Holidays!

christmasDIGIcard2014_E-News

 

Thanks everyone for supporting our blog over 2014, we are looking forward to writing more blogs in 2015!
Enjoy any time off you may have. Enjoy your families and friends.

From all the bloggers at EXAIR – Neal, Brian, Russ, Lee, Dave, Justin, and John
Over the holidays we will be closed 12/24/14 – 12/25/14 and 1/1/15 – 1/2/15

 

 

An Advantage of Vortex Tube Based Cabinet Cooler Systems

Today, I begin publishing the first in a series of blog posts about some common misconceptions of vortex based cooling. The primary focus will be cooling electrical panels, but we may touch on a few other application for vortex tubes as well.

A Cabinet Cooler System is a low cost, reliable way to cool and purge electronic control panels or small enclosures. The EXAIR Cabinet Cooler System incorporates a vortex tube to produce cold air from compressed air without any moving parts.

VT

How a Vortex Tube Works

 

I want to take on the most difficult myth first. I was attending a compressed air conference recently where Cabinet Cooler Systems were listed as a waste of compressed air. Saying Cabinet Cooler Systems waste compressed air is like saying automobiles waste gas. A ’74 Dodge Monaco station wagon was best served to haul 8 kids to Florida and use three times the gasoline of (4) 2014 Honda Civics, but the automobile was driven everyday on that 15 mile work commute.  Comparatively, a 5,600 BTU/HR Dual Cabinet Cooler System without a thermostat, cooling an enclosure the size of a shoebox, is a waste of compressed air. Using a properly sized, thermostat controlled Cabinet Cooler system upon an enclosure will protect your company from thousands of dollars in equipment damage and hours of downtime caused by heat damaged electronics – this is not a waste of compressed air. I understand what the presenter wanted to say, and like anything else, if the product is not sized right or installed improperly it will not operate as efficiently as it could. Cabinet Cooler systems do not waste compressed air, they utilize compressed air.

nema12thrmocntrsys

The components of a NEMA 12 Cabinet Cooler System w/ thermostat control.

 

One of the places where Cabinet Cooler Systems shine are dirty, dusty environments where maintenance to air conditioners costs thousands of dollars in replacement parts and man hours every year.  Take one look at the troubleshooting guide for these units and you will find a litany of items that need to be replaced: evaporator coils, motors, wheels, compressor, or capacitor. In many cases, this replacement needs to be done by an outside contractor, which only adds to the cost.

Vortex based cooling improves on air conditioning in dusty or dirty environments in two ways. A vortex based cabinet cooler has no moving parts to wear out or be replaced. The units have been known to last for more than two decades. This lack of moving parts means that a dusty environment will not have an operational impact on the Cabinet Cooler Systems. Secondly, Vortex based coolers can create a positive pressure inside a sealed enclosure. This positive pressure can prevent dust from entering that cabinet. Dust inside of cabinet will cover heat sinks, chip sets, and internal fan blades to prevent air movement and insulate hot parts from heat transfer. If you are comparing a vortex based cooler to a fan in a dusty environment, the vortex based cooler will be pushing dust out of the pipe. The fan will be pulling dust in to the enclosure. The dust pulled in by the fan will lower the cooling capacity of the fan and limit the heat transfer from the heat sink or the circuitry of the device.

I wrote a bit more about this first myth than I intended. This may turn in to a ten part series, if I keep going like this.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
@EXAIR_DW
DaveWoerner@EXAIR.com

Reclassifying Mufflers

Have you ever walked into an industrial plant and noticed a “fog” in the air? If they have pneumatic equipment, then it is a good chance that it is an oil mist. With many pneumatic devices, they need oil to lubricate the o-rings and cylinders for functionality and life. This is generally done with a lubricator. A lubricator puts a small amount of oil in the compressed air line to coat the inside of valves and cylinders. The problem becomes when the valve switches or the cylinder retracts, the excess air is exhausted into the atmosphere. And with that air, there is a fine mist creating the “fog”.

Reclassifying Muffler

EXAIR Reclassifying mufflers are available from 1/8 NPT through 1 NPT

 

Most pneumatic equipment will have some type of muffler to reduce the noise. Typically they are a sintered bronze muffler. They work well in noise reduction, but they do not capture the oil. OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Association) has a requirement for operator’s exposure. Under the standard 29CFR 1910.1000, the cumulative exposure for a worker is 4.32 PPM (parts per million) for an 8 hour shift and a standard 40 hour week. As EXAIR Corporation is a leader in safety with compressed air systems, we created a muffler with an oil coalescer, or our Reclassifying Muffler. The Reclassifying Muffler will be able to accomplish two things: 1. reduce the noise level, and 2. remove the oil from the exhausted air. The complex matrix of fibers absorbs the noise caused by the pressure relief. Also, this same complex matrix of fibers creates a tortuous path for the oil particles. It will collect on the fibers and coalesce into larger particles. The larger oil particles will now be able to have gravity move the residual oil down the side of the Reclassifying Muffler. At the bottom, we have a sump that will contain the waste oil and a ¼” tube adaptor to discard it safely away. We have a range of sizes from 1/8” npt to 1” npt depending on the amount of exhaust air flow. In some instances, you can manifold the lines together to use one larger Reclassifying Muffler. An instance of this would be many small valves inside an electrical cabinet that would need to have the exhaust air removed. With our range of Reclassifying Mufflers, you will not have to walk around in the fog.

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

From Russia With Heat

The EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide

The EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide

I was once told that the people of Russia have historically migrated to colder regions, despite other people of the world doing the exact opposite.  I’m not sure how true that is, but I am sure that many parts of the vast countryside experience some extremely cold temperatures.

One of our Russian distributors exchanges emails with me regularly and will normally ask about the sunshine here in Ohio.  They will tease me in the summer when it is 35°C (95°F) in Cincinnati, but I have my turn in the winter when it is -10°C (14°F) in St. Petersburg.

And, even though the temperatures drop below freezing for months on end, there are still overheating conditions of the electrical enclosures in industrial facilities.  Because of this, I stay in constant contact about heat load calculations and installation setups.

The best tool for determining heat load of an application, and suitability of an EXAIR Cabinet Cooler, is the Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide.  If the dropping temperatures outside aren’t carrying over to your electrical device enclosures inside, send in a Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide and an EXAIR Application Engineer will perform the calculations for you.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

%d bloggers like this: