Super Ion Air Knife Cleans Product Exiting Cutting Application

Yesterday, I had a customer call in to discuss his application regarding chip and debris removal from his product. The customer described his process of cutting lenses for light fixtures that their company manufactures. While he was explaining the application and the problem, I was building a picture of it in my mind.  To help in the understanding the customer e-mailed me a photo of the application so I could really see the mess he was trying to deal with.

Once I saw the photo, I could see that my understanding was off just a little concerning the automatic nature of the cutting machine. Instead of having an operator pulling the cut lenses off the machine and blow them down, he wanted the lenses to come out already cut and blown free of static, debris and dust.

Once I saw the photo above, I could see that the flat nature of the target product was a perfect fit for the Super Ion Air Knife Kit model 111218. That unit fit the customer’s machine guard just right in order to accommodate the various widths of material that he processed through the cutting function. He set the Super Ion Air Knife up to blow down at a 45° angle opposite the travel of the material. In effect, he was blowing back toward the saw blade which had a vacuum system attached. Not only was the material able to exit cleaned, but it kept the processing area cleaner as well as the chips and other debris were deflected back to where the vacuum system could pull them in.

The customer’s improvement in productivity actually doubled as an aid in their housekeeping within the processing area.

Neal Raker
Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com

New Rain Gauge

Ohio’s new rain gauge

I just received my new Ohio rain gauge. Did you get one for your state? Almost the entire US is under a moderated to severe drought. The drought coupled with unseasonably warm temperatures has made it dangerous for those who have to work out in it.Searing temperatures not only present a danger to personnel, but takes its toll on industrial electronics. As manufacturing becomes more sophisticated, sensitive electronic controls are being used. The drawback is that they are designed for environments of 104F. When ambient temperatures rise, the permeation of heat through the panel walls is reduced. The heat created by the electronics is not able to radiate out fast enough, causing the internal temperatures to rise. Temperatures above 104F not only will cause readout faults, but will reduce the life of the electrical components by as much as 50%. Replacing boards is horrendously expensive.

A simple cost-effective method of controlling panel temperatures is with an EXAIR Cabinet Cooler System. Using compressed air to generate refrigerated air with no moving parts, they provide maintenance free operation. Being a closed loop system, they prevent the egress of contaminants into the panel.

Give one of our application engineers a call to see how one will work for you.

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer
Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax   (513) 671-3363
Web: www.exair.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Always Here to Help

Today when I leave from work I will be going home to hook up a 20′ enclosed trailer and drive it to Memphis, TN in order to help my brother in-law pack up his family and their belongings to move them back up to Cincinnati.  This was something that just came up last weekend and so I have spent every night working on the trailer getting it clean and in good travel condition.  I’m not doing this because I have to, it’s just the way I am, part of my nature I guess.  I volunteered to help with the process because if I found myself in the same situation he was in I know I would be looking for as much help as possible. A picture of the what is in the trailer for the trip is below.  I’m actually hauling two trailers, one inside the other.  I consider this the Turducken of the hauling industry.

This is essentially the same way we operate here at EXAIR.  If you have a compressed air issue or a problem with a process and we are able to help, we will.  We’re not going to try to draw the process out or make you wait weeks to get the items shipped out to you when you need them tomorrow.  For all stock orders received by 3:30 P.M. EST that are shipping within the United States we will ship the order same day.  This means you’ll get your product quickly and then if you have any questions on implementing the product we’ll even be here to support you over the phone, via live chat, or through e-mail.  We even have all the installation and maintenance instructions and CAD models available on our website if you want them before you order or receive the product.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Solar Radiation and Electrical Enclosures

Before I get started, I should mention that I’m quite fond of the sun. Now, I don’t spend a lot of my time working on a “bronze god” kind of tan, nor do I own the proper equipment that would have allowed me to observe, in first-person, the recent transit of the planet Venus (I did see quite a few amazing photos and videos on the internet, though). I did make it a point to be outside during the last solar eclipse that was visible in the Midwest. It was a perfect day for it too…a bright clear day in May 1994, my girlfriend & I had a lunch date, and we were lucky enough to get a table on the patio. Her father had a pair of welding goggles that she was able to borrow a lens from, and our server got us free dessert for letting her look at the eclipse through them. That’s one of a gazillion fond date memories I have with the girl that agreed to be my wife, two years later. Solar eclipse AND free dessert…it’s actually near the top of that list…

If I’m spending any time at all in the sun, though, I don’t take chances, because, as fond as I am of the sun, I am equally un-fond of sunburn. Which brings me to my topic today: solar radiation.

We are right in the middle of a very busy Cabinet Cooler season at EXAIR. Most of the applications we’re getting calls on are for indoor installations, but more than a few callers are in need of cooling for an outdoor electrical enclosure. A prime consideration in determining the total heat load for these is the heat absorption due to solar radiation, or “sun load.”

First and foremost, if you have an electrical cabinet outdoors, you can eliminate sun load by simply preventing the sun’s rays from shining on it. If you can mount it to a north wall, or get it under an awning, that’s ideal. And it’s all you have to do.

If you can’t control the mounting location, and your enclosure has to be exposed to direct sunlight, then you’re most likely going to need a significantly higher amount of cooling. Just this morning, I helped a caller determine the heat load on a small outdoor enclosure in the deep South…before accounting for sun load, they were looking at a total heat load of 450 BTU/hr, which our smallest Cabinet Cooler System is more than capable of handling. Adding in sun load, though, their mid-day/midsummer heat load was over 2,500 BTU/hr, which would require a system that consumed more compressed air. We encourage using as little air as possible; they’re looking at what it would take to put an awning on it.

If you have any say in it, the color/finish of the cabinet’s exterior makes a big difference, too. A polished aluminum, or white painted, surface will absorb less than 20% of the solar radiation as a black cabinet. And if it’s grey, the lighter the better.

Like I said, it’s a busy Cabinet Cooler season here, but we always have time for, and welcome, the next caller. Don’t forget, you’ll receive a free AC Sensor with any Cabinet Cooler purchase through then end of July…for anyone who loses track of the calendar (like I do), that’s next week. Anyway, we look forward to seeing how we can help. Give us a call!

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: http://www.exair.com
Blog: https://blog.exair.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Cincinnati Institutions – Baseball, 3-Ways and Vortex Tubes

Every decent sized town has its own institutions. Cincinnati proper’s population is about 300,000 while the greater Cincinnati area is 2.1 million. Founded in 1788, Cincinnati grew as a result of the Miami-Erie Canal connecting Lake Erie to the Ohio river and became a major trade partner with the southern states. And as every city will, it began to develop its personality…

The Cincinnati Red Stockings, the countries first professional baseball team was created in 1869. There has been baseball in this town ever since, and the Reds are having a fairly good season this time around.

Baseball history photo: An 1868 studio photo of the 36 and 7 Cincinnati Club with a listing of the player’s primary position. Standing (L to R): Asa Brainard, Second Base/Pitcher; J. Williams Johnson, Right Field, Johnny Hatfield, Left Field; Rufus King, Centre Field; John Con Howe, Short Stop. Seated (L to R): Harry Wright, Pitcher; Fred Waterman, Third Base; Charley Gould, First Base; Moses Grant, Substitute.
Of course many cities also develop their own unique flavors and tastes. Around here, Cincinnati style chili represents our unique taste. Order yours as a 3-way, 4-way or 5-way and you’ll receive chili covered spaghetti topped with cheese (3-way); add onions (4-way); add beans (5-way). Years ago, as an outsider myself (a Wolverine in Buckeye territory no less) I couldn’t fathom this even represented what chili should actually be. Today, however, I can regularly be found thoroughly enjoying a 3-way.

Cincinnati chili, 3-way style.
Major business is also a part of every cities identity. Cincinnati houses the world headquarters of Procter and Gamble and Kroger. GE Aviation has built jet engines here since 1946. It also depends on a large and diverse manufacturing base to keep people working.

That’s where EXAIR comes in, as part of that diverse manufacturing base. Cincinnati is also the genesis of commercial Vortex Tube technology and developing Vortex Tube products for the industrial manufacturing market. EXAIR has been a part of that tradition for 29 years, our founder has been involved with the Vortex Tube market for 40 years.

The uniqueness of Vortex Tubes, and the way they operate, make them suitable for many industrial applications. Applications which require low maintenance, steadfast, reliable solutions will benefit form a Vortex Tube product. Vortex Tubes will also remain operational in extreme environments whether it is from a overly dirty or oily surrounding to very hot or isolated in a remote part of a facility where regular maintenance is not an option.

Vortex Tube products can cool small areas where space is limited such as cooling brazed joints on a rotary assembly station or cooling glue beads in a packaging operation. Heat seals can be cooled to prevent leakage and high temperature camera electronics can be kept cool when looking into furnaces or boilers.

Cabinet Coolers systems are in full swing this time of year as well. Based on Vortex Tube technology, these products keep your electronic cabinets from overheating in the sweltering summers, or if they are packed with heat generating components that cause problems year round. Cabinet Cooler systems benefit from the same inherent qualities of a Vortex Tube; low maintenance, durable, reliable, low cost and simple to install. See the video below.

So whether it is baseball, Cincinnati style chili or Vortex Tubes – EXAIR is proud to be part of the institutions of Cincinnati.

Kirk Edwards
Application Engineer
kirkedwards@exair.com

The Proof is in the Pudding

In a conversation with my co-workers, I was explaining the accuracy of my electronic powder scale. I told them that it so sensitive that all measurements have to be made under a cover to avoid any air currents. In fact it could weigh the ink of a hand written note. Due to their disbelief, I became the butt of their jokes the rest of the afternoon. To prove my point I weighed for them a sticky note. It weighed 1.7 grains. Then I wrote “this weighs 1.7 grains” on the note and weighed it again. It weighed 1.9 grains!

We will occasionally experience similar circumstances here at work. A customer has a hard time believing a particular product will work, especially if we recommend something different than what they had in mind. In corresponding fashion that I showed the accuracy of my powder scale, we can also show the performance of EXAIR products.

EXAIR is so confident in its products that it offers a 30 day unconditional guarantee. If for any reason you are not satisfied you can return it for full credit. No salesmen here making promises that cannot be achieved. Have an application that you think one of EXAIR’s product could help you, give a call to one of our application engineers. They are not salesmen and will be up front with you as to whether or not it will work. If they cannot help you, they will do their best to direct you to a company that can.

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer
Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax   (513) 671-3363
Web: www.exair.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Are you a DIY / Hacker / Too cheap to pay for stuff like me?

I have noticed over the past decade that the definition (or at least what I considered the definition) of a hacker has altered.  When the term “Hacker” is tossed around, most will think of computers and electronic devices.  Now, there are people who consider it to be a hack when simply finding a way to alter a device to be used for something other than it’s original intent.  Wikipedia® lists the definition of a hacker as having three different types.  (Wikipedia link)

Today I would consider myself a Hacker (that would be of the hobbyist type).  In the past month, I have helped to re-purpose several items that may have been thrown away, refused to pay someone to fix a faulty gas range, and built a cheaper more robust pedestal for our washer and dryer.  I’ve been told I do this simply because I am frugal or cheap.  The truth of the matter is I simply won’t give up on trying to do something myself until I feel I have exhausted every idea I can conjure up.

That is the same effort that we put into our applications and projects here at EXAIR. If we can’t figure it out with the first try, we don’t stop there.  This is what gives us the knowledge needed to answer the questions when you call.  If we haven’t worked with the exact application before, chances are we’ve come close and we’ll have a very good idea about what can be done to meet or exceed your needs.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer / Hacker
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF