Save Money By Not Using A Thermostat? Well…

I’m going to let the cat out of the bag right now and tell you that a Cabinet Cooler System with Thermostat Control costs more to purchase than one without.  So yes, by passing on the Thermostat Control, you WILL save money on the purchase.  But that may be your ONLY realization of any money saved.  Let’s consider:

Recently, a customer submitted a Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide – our simple guide for gathering key pieces of information about the state of customer’s enclosures. An EXAIR Application Engineer can quickly & accurately calculate the actual heat load of an electrical enclosure, and specify the appropriate Cabinet Cooler System, when given the information.

You can submit your data via email or fax, or you can call an EXAIR Application Engineer for immediate assistance.

You can submit your data via email or fax, or you can call an EXAIR Application Engineer for immediate assistance.

I calculated the total heat load of their enclosure to be 2,200 Btu/hr, so I specified a Model 4340 NEMA 12 Cabinet Cooler System rated for 2,800 Btu/hr, with Thermostat Control.  At this point, we’re occasionally asked about the down-side of not using a Thermostat.

The calculated heat load of 2,200 Btu/hr is 78.5% of the Model 4340’s 2,800 Btu/hr cooling capacity.  That means, theoretically, the Thermostat Control will turn off the compressed air supply 21.5% of the time:

40 SCF x 60 min x 8 hr x 5 days x 52 weeks x 21.50% = 1,073,280 SCF
min hr day week year year

At EXAIR, we know, first hand, the benefit of saving a million Standard Cubic Feet of compressed air.  We use a general thumbrule which holds that 1,000 SCF of compressed air costs $0.25 to generate.  So here it is, in dollars and cents:

1,073,280 SCF x $0.25 = $268.32 annual savings
year 1,000 SCF

In this example, the Thermostat Control will pay for itself within the first year.

Summer is approaching in the Northern Hemisphere.  If you’d like to find out more about how EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems can protect your electrical and electronic components from heat damage, give me a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
Find us on the Web
Follow me on Twitter
Like us on Facebook

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: