Heavy Duty Line Vac for Blasting Media Recovery

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Many times we will get the call from customers who are in the media blasting industry. Media blasting is used in many cases to clean or strip debris, residue, paint or other contamination from the surface of a variety of parts. This cleaning process is generally used to prepare a surface to receive further preparations or perhaps even a coat of primer or paint.

The media blasting process works very well. The only downside is that once the media is spent through the nozzle, it bounces off the part and lands on the ground or any other horizontal surface in the blasting room. So, clean-up after a session of blasting can become a real headache for the operators. Generally, they will want to recover the media for re-use as it can be quite expensive to purchase.

That’s where EXAIR comes in with our Heavy Duty Line Vac product. The Heavy Duty Line Vac has exceptionally high suction capability to move even the densest of blasting media back up into the supply hopper so it can be run through the system over and over. The highly abrasion resistant material of the Heavy Duty Line Vac has been tested with aggressive media such as ground glass and ground garnet and has a proven record of tolerance for moving such material without excessive wear. Other materials of construction like aluminum, stainless steel or hard anodized coatings will wear and degrade – the hardened alloy of the Heavy Duty Line Vac is the best choice for abrasive materials. 

Normally, customers in this industry will opt for the 1-1/2” or 2” model of our Heavy Duty Line Vac for their post blasting clean-up processes. It really takes a task that is true drudgery and turns it into a simple task. It takes the pain away for sure.

If you are in the blasting industry and have similar issues, we invite you to contact us and ask about the Heavy Duty Line Vac range of products. You will be glad you did.

Neal Raker, Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com

 

EXAIR Heavy Duty Line Vac Re-Loads Rainfall Sander

In the world of lost wax casting a wax pattern is created and then fused to a wax runner system along with multiples of other patterns or perhaps the same pattern. Once the “tree” of wax patterns is created, the tree is coated with a fine material to reproduce fine details in the pattern and is then “stuccoed” with a coarse, ceramic material. It is this application of the coarse ceramic material process with which my most recent customer needed help. It was not so much the application of the ceramic material to the wax pattern but the refilling of the rainfall sander which is the tool that actually applies the ceramic to the patterns. Below is a photo of a rainfall sander for your reference.

As you can see a fine, water fall-like flow of sand dropping down from above provides the means for the “stuccoing” process.

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The problem is that the hoppers for these machines can be in excess of 7 feet above the floor and require replenishing. The idea is to put just the right amount of material into the hopper without over-filling which has been a problem in the past with the customer dumping by hand over-head.

The solution the customer was looking for was the 1-1/2” Heavy Duty Line Vac to be used in a moveable cart-based hopper filling tool with a gallows-type over arm which can be placed above the hopper of each machine to provide the metered filling.

The reasons for picking the Heavy Duty version of the EXAIR Line Vac was for its robust resistance to abrasion from high speed materials moving through the throat area. Heavy Duty Line Vac is made of a high grade, tool steel with a proprietary surface treatment to harden the material even further to make the unit highly resistant to abrasion. The Heavy Duty Line Vac has been used with such materials as silica sand, ground glass and ground garnet for hopper replenishment in abrasive blasting applications, so it could handle the stucco material quite nicely. The higher conveying capacity of the Heavy Duty Line Vac also made quick work of the material being conveyed to make for unobtrusive service.

Neal Raker, EXAIR
nealraker@exair.com