Vortex Tube Cools Glue On A Paper Folding Machine

I recently worked on a cooling application with an engineering company who designed a paper folding machine for their customer. As the paper enters the machine, it travels over a series of rollers or “plows” that folds the paper into the desired design. At the last step a heated glue is applied to the edge so the paper stays folded. After the paper leaves the folder it is sent to a stack machine to be processed and packaged for shipment. It was at this area they were starting to see some issues arise as the glue was retaining heat, causing it to leak onto the dividers of the stacker or other finished papers.

Example of a paper folding machine

To try and remedy the situation, the customer had installed an air nozzle to blow compressed air across the last fold and while this did work somewhat, they had to operate at really low pressure so they didn’t cause the paper to move while trying to cool the glue. This slowed the process down, which was negatively affecting their production output, so they reached out for assistance on a more reliable solution.

After further discussing the process with the design company, I recommended they use our Model # 3908 Small Vortex Tube Cooling Kit. The Vortex Tube Cooling Kits include the Vortex Tube, cold muffler, tubing, filter separator and all of the generators to change the flow rate and cooling capacity of the Vortex Tube during operation. The temperature drop from the supply air temperature and the volume of air being exhausted can be controlled by adjusting the valve in the hot end to change the cold fraction (the percentage of air being exhausted out of the cold end versus the amount of air being exhausted out of the hot end).

Items included in a Vortex Tube Cooling Kit

By incorporating the Cooling Kit into the process, the customer would be able to experiment with the airflow and temperature to achieve an acceptable balance, providing enough cold air to cure the glue, while not disrupting the process. If you have a similar process you would like to discuss, please contact an application engineer at 800-903-9247 for assistance.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

The Folding Machine 4 image courtesy of Ms. Tharpe via creative commons license

Solving a Printing Problem with EXAIR Static Eliminators

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Unrolling plastic into this machine created a static charge throughout the process

One of the most common sources of static electricity in automated processes is friction.  As two (or more) materials move against each other, static is produced due to the triboelectric effect.  By definition, the triboelectric effect is a type of contact electrification in which certain materials become electrically charged after they come into frictional contact with a different material.  If these materials are non-conductive, or if they are not grounded, the static charge will remain.  This was the case for the machine shown above.

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Multiple stations of this machine, all experiencing static problems

This machine is a Chesnut 150 Gravure Print Station.  It is used for printing, coating, laminating, and sometimes die cutting of paper, light paperboard, films, polyester, flexible packaging and aluminum foil.

In this application, a roll of plastic is dispensed, but a static charge is preventing proper printing on the plastic as it travels from roll to roll.  As the film is separated from the roll, a static charge is produced, and this charge is carried through the process at values ranging from 3,000 – 20,000 volts.  The manager for this production area contacted EXAIR to see if there’s a viable EXAIR solution to remove this static charge.  They were interested in a solution that could eliminate static on the full width of the plastic, could be mounted 200-300mm away from the rollers, and could be replicated at multiple places along the machine.

With this in mind, the best solution was to use a series of 18” Super Ion Air Knives installed periodically along the path of plastic within the machine.  Operating at a low pressure of 1-2 BARG (14.5 – 29 PSIG), the Super Ion Air Knives create an evenly dispersed, quiet airflow of static eliminating ions with a low compressed air consumption.  Using the laminar, static eliminating airflow from the Super Ion Air Knife, this solution can be mounted away from the static charge, allowing the ions to “rain” down on the affected areas.

For this application finding a solution meant finding a method to keep production on schedule.  Without static elimination this machine faced defects, downtime, and decreased efficiency.  Using EXAIR Super Ion Air Knives brought this application back up to optimal operating speeds, keeping the revenue generating process of this manufacturer ongoing.

Colder weather is here and static comes along with it.  If you’re experiencing a static related problem in your facility, contact one of our Application Engineers.  We’d love to help you find a solution.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

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