Another Year Is Coming To A Close

Happy New Year to Everyone!!
Happy New Year to Everyone!!

With the holiday weekend upon us it is time to look back at what we have achieved this year.  EXAIR has released dozens of new products to help with all your compressed air needs; we launched a new method for you to get our information, our mobile site.  There have also been several Professor Penurious videos released and even a few new product videos.

While we have been staying busy making all of these items possible and I can guarantee that next year will be no different.  Here at EXAIR we are proud to say that we are the market leader in Intelligent Compressed Air Products.  We didn’t get that way by not maintaining our information, or inventing new products, or only blogging once a year.  We know that our people are the best, and we want to keep them working hard for our customers. We push and push everyday to make certain that we are a better company than any of our imitators.

With that being said, enjoy the new year, and make sure to watch for more products, videos, tweets, and information from EXAIR.

Peace and Joy to all in 2013.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

You’re Welcome

Some friends and I recently discussed what passes (and, more to the point, doesn’t pass) for politeness in conversation. One of my friends has a real problem with restaurant servers who ask if he’s “all set.” He claims that the question doesn’t make any sense…”’All set’ for what?” he’ll ask back, to which the server will usually reply “Is there anything else I can get you right now?” which is the question my friend wanted to be asked in the first place.  He is a very generous tipper, so, in retrospect, I don’t think most servers mind when he vocalizes this particular pet peeve.

We also talked about using the phrases “Excuse me?” and “Please?” if you didn’t hear/understand what someone said, and you’d like them to repeat themselves. Our consensus was that they appear to be interchangeable, are somewhat regional in prevalence, but universally preferable to our teens’ (and tweens’) mumbling of “whut?” to which I reply “Excuse me?” and my son will remember his manners. Especially when it’s accompanied by the condescending raised eyebrow.

The hottest topic seemed to be the substitution of “No problem” for “You’re welcome,” especially in business conversations. Everyone agreed that the latter is far more polite, and much better received. Since I took three years of French in High School, I pointed out that the formal phrase for “You’re Welcome,” en Français (pronounced aw-fraw SAY), is “Il n’ya pas de quoi,” which, literally translated, means “This thing (you are thanking me for) is nothing.” So, the perceived level of politeness may be cultural in this case.

Personally, en Anglais (pronounced on-on GLAZE), I very much prefer “You’re welcome,” and bristle (albeit internally) when I hear “No problem” – it’s like I tried, and failed, to inconvenience the person. That is very rarely my intent, and I like to think that I’m quite accomplished at putting people out, if I apply myself to the task. My friends were all in agreement with me on this. I may need better friends.

So, do you have a linguistic “pet peeve?”  Or would you prefer if I called it an “aversion” or a “vexation?”

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: http://www.exair.com
Blog: https://blog.exair.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

What If This Is The END? Or The Beginning?

What if the theory that the world ends today is right? Are there any outstanding grudges you would prefer to smooth out before?  What about regrets, decisions that you were on the fence about?  Does it bring what is important to you into perspective?  Will you even think about it?

My personal belief is that we’ll still be here on Monday.  However, I am still going to make sure to give my daughters and wife an extra hug and kiss, tell them I love them an extra time, and in the case it does end I will make sure I am with them.  Now that the sappy part is over….

In the case it is the end of the world as we know it and the beginning of the zombie apocalypse, that changes everything.  While I don’t have a laid out plan I will admit I have thought about what I would do.  Number one on the list is of course protect the family and find someplace to “bug out” to.

Then it is time to ensure the armament is appropriate, this would more than likely mean I won’t be using any of EXAIR’s products.  The reason for this is simple, you can’t put an end to a zombie with a product that is engineered to be safe for all personnel.  This means no Soft Grip Safety Air Guns or Super Air Knives for the armory.

Now, once a compound has been established we will use EXAIR products to conserve the compressed air when fabricating so we can conserve what energy we have.

So if it is the end, thanks for reading and it’s been a great experience to be able to “entertain” you.

If it’s the beginning, if you are a zombie you can’t read this, if you can read this, make it to a safe haven and if you have no idea what to do, watch Zombieland.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Cooler Than a Fan

Glass cooling transport tables

Late last week I was contacted by a gentleman with an application for cooling glass.  The company produced glass with an anti-reflective coating.  After the coating is applied to the glass, it needs to be cooled as it is moved along transport tables.

Having faced a similar dilemma before, this facility had already installed (3) Super Air Knives to cool the glass.  For the previous production line, the solution was more than adequate.  However, the problem facing the new application is that the glass and coating must be cooled even further for a new setup and it is crucial to the quality of the coating that the cooling is achieved evenly and within the given cycle time.

Air Knife Setup in Latvia

Enter again, the Super Air Knife.  In the initial application, the airflow was directed so that it was in contact with the bottom of the glass, as in the sketch above.  In this way, the product was cooled sufficiently, but the top surface of the glass was left completely untreated.  The recommended solution to gain the necessary cooling was to install Super Air Knives which treat the top surface of the glass.

Our staff of Application Engineers is well suited to recommend solutions for any application.  Feel free to give us a call.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
leeevans@exair.com
@EXAIR_LE

Is My Static Eliminator Working?

Winter is settling in on us, slowly but surely, here in Cincinnati. As I write, it’s 39F and overcast outside…not nearly as harsh as it’s going to get, come mid-January. With the dropping temperatures comes a decrease in humidity levels, especially inside, where our heaters inconveniently rob our air of its moisture content. This leads to chapped lips and dry skin for us, and a higher propensity for static charge to build up on non-conductive surfaces. It’s then that we find ourselves at the onset of “Static Season,” when the volume of calls regarding our Static Eliminator product line (and, hopefully, sales of said products) increases.

A good number of those calls come from existing users, too, which is great, because we’re genuinely interested in problem-solving, and making sure that folks get the most out of our products. A popular question is, “How do I know if my Static Eliminator is working properly?” There are a few ways to determine this:

The easiest, quickest, and most sure-fire way is to measure the actual level of static charge, “before and after,” with EXAIR’s Digital Static Meter. It’s a convenient, hand-held, battery-operated instrument that indicates the surface voltage and polarity when held 1” away from the object.

Another easy and quick method to check for proper operation of a Static Eliminator is to sniff for the presence of ozone near the device’s emitter point(s). With the compressed air source turned off (for safety, of course, but for no small measure of comfort as well), you’ll be able to smell the distinct odor of ozone – it’s been described as pungent, sweet, or metallic. It’s the same smell around your copy machine after a load of copies.

If you’re handy with a multi-meter, you can also check for proper voltage at the emitter point(s). We have a step-by-step guide to show how it’s done; contact an Application Engineer to get a copy.

If any of the above trials point to a problem with your Static Eliminator, the step-by-step guide also walks you through the procedure for a thorough cleaning of your device. Additionally, we’ve made some handy videos that we hope will help too:

Ionizing Bar Cleaning & Maintenance

Ion Air Gun Cleaning & Maintenance

Even with a properly functioning Static Eliminator, there may be installation or operational issues that are limiting its effectiveness. If this is the case, give us a call…like I said before, we’ve got a genuine interest in problem-solving, and we’re eager to help.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: http://www.exair.com
Blog: https://blog.exair.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Adjustable Spot Cooler as an Enclosure Cooler……Really???

Yes, is true. Many times when customers contact us about keeping a “cabinet” or “enclosure” cool, the enclosed space is not always your typical electrical or control panel cooling situation. Sometimes, customers have simple boxes or enclosed spaces that are reasonably small and need to be cooled for a variety of reasons.

ASC

This next example is one where a customer has a special light used in a paper making application. The light is exposed to high humidity and high heat which are normal constituents in paper making. The customer has had the light fail and the reasons were specifically attributed to the heat and humidity. In looking for a solution to his problem, the customer came across EXAIR and our Vortex Tube product. He researched and became familiar with the virtues of using a Vortex Tube for small cooling applications like this one.

When he contacted me his mind was pointed in the direction of a plain and simple Vortex Tube which is a good start. What I suggested to him though, was to consider using an Adjustable Spot Cooler instead. An Adjustable Spot Cooler is a Vortex Tube; however it is engineered to include heat shielding and sound muffling which make the whole use of a Vortex Tube a much more user friendly experience. Basically, I did not want the customer to try and have to figure out these issues on his own when we had a stock product ready to use right out of the box. All he has to do is to connect the unit to his box to be cooled, connect the compressed air and adjust the output temperature to what he wanted it to be.

You may ask, “Why didn’t he recommend a Cabinet Cooler?” That is a good question. I didn’t recommend a Cabinet Cooler for one good reason. Cabinet Coolers are designed with a target temperature of 95F (35C) in mind. In this case, the customer wanted to maintain close to 65F (18C). This fact fit well with the easy adjustment of the Adjustable Spot Cooler to accommodate the target temperature. Flexibility was a key feature in terms of being able to set the target temperature and have it field adjustable as well.

Neal Raker
Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com

Video Blog: How to Rebuild an EXAIR Safety Air Gun

While EXAIR’s safety air guns are of robust design, they do see some harsh environments and eventually some of the moving parts can wear out. EXAIR offers rebuild kits.

  • For the Soft Grip Safety Air Gun use part #1901A or #1901
  • For the Heavy Duty Safety Air Gun use part #1902

Here is a video on how to install the new components.


If you need help give our application engineers a call 1-800-903-9247

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer
Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax   (513) 671-3363
Web: www.exair.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair