A Good Example of Dedication and Commitment from the First Grade

This year, my oldest daughter started First Grade.  My second daughter will be starting preschool two days a week, and the youngest, well she just has no fear and doesn’t see the consequences of her actions at this point in life.   To say the least, the past few weeks have been extremely busy, as I am sure it has been for most of us.

A Great Message For School. (Not On Our Schools)
A Great Message For School.

I went to the parent – teacher introduction night with my beautiful wife and we got to meet the first grade teacher who definitely has her work cut out for her.   The amount of effort and care this teacher has poured into this class is already apparent in the first week of school.   She sent us all her personal cell phone number, sends out updates through a smartphone app, and has even told all parents that if a child in her classroom is involved in an activity outside of school that she will attend one of these events because she wants to see the children in their element and see what makes them happy.  All of these “extra” things the teacher does, she doesn’t get paid for, and is strictly doing out of her love for teaching and the children she teaches.  She legitimately loves her job and wants to see each of these students succeed in life.

There are people who teach that go to their job and give the bare minimum to not get let go and to merely collect a paycheck.   There are also a great number of educators that go above and beyond every day of the school year.  When it comes to teachers, so far my oldest daughter has been extremely blessed.  She had an amazing teacher for both Preschool, Kindergarten, and now even First Grade.   Each of these has also been at 3 different schools where she has thrived and I could not be happier with our school district.  I even mentioned to my wife, who is a former primary teacher, that I do not look forward to the year that one of our three daughters has a teacher that she does not agree with.  (That is going to be an extremely long year.)

Just as I noticed the level of dedication from the teachers I have had the joy of meeting, I have also realized that in order to succeed and thrive, there has to be dedication and going beyond the minimum.  This is what I see everyday when I walk through the doors here at EXAIR.  Whether I am walking through the front offices or the production areas, we by no means have a single team member that gives the minimum.  Every person here cares about whether or not the other succeeds, and we all work together with the same goal, blow our customer’s expectations out of the water.  This is just one reason we continue to release new products, offer the best means to contact us, as well as ship stock products same day, and provide order confirmations and install support for every single order.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer Manager
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

 

Photo Credit: Jdog90 – Flickr – Creative Commons https://flic.kr/p/awAXzv

 

 

If Only I Had A Line Vac When I Was A Kid

I read an article earlier this week talking about the types of toys you played with as a child and what your career lead to.  Then I got to thinking, what if I had some EXAIR products and an air compressor when I was a kid?  What kind of madness could ensue?

The first item that came to mind for me was using a Line Vac.  This would not only be used to propel Hot Wheels a record breaking speeds into the loop of death or see how many full size cars the scaled car can jump.   Also what happens to a full size car when you launch a small die cast car into it?   Needless to say that is not all the ideas I have had for taking the orange track to the next level.

In case cars weren’t your thing, a Line Vac would be great to launch a parachute assault using your favorite G.I. Joe with a parachute, not to mention go quite higher than I could ever through it.  It could also help launch zip lines or remove excavated dirt out of bunkers.

When I was a child, I didn’t know what compressed air or an air compressor was other than that my dad used one to inflate bike tires.   Now, I work around compressed air every single day and I make sure to introduce my girls to it whenever possible,  especially how to use compressed air safe.

The point is, a lot of the toys I played with as a child kept me thinking about mechanical ways to do things and thus I ended up with a degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology.  Hopefully by introducing kids today to our products and the many uses they will help perpetuate the design cycles of Intelligent Compressed Air Products.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

 

How can you protect people that don’t protect themselves?

My sister-in-law and my nephews are traveling from Columbus to Cincinnati for a visit this weekend. My nephews are 18 months and 3 years old, and they will find any sharp, fragile, or flammable object within walking, crawling or climbing distance. Of course they don’t consider these things dangerous. All they see are fun new toys. Yesterday, I battened down the hatches for the nephew hurricane that will be barreling down Interstate 71 this weekend, and there were more dangerous or scary items in the house that the nephews will want to use than I could hide.

At EXAIR, we strive to provide products that intelligently use compressed air, but everyday we have customers who are using compressed air in unsafe manner. We try to educate many of our customers and the industry as whole of the dangers and that can be associated with compressed air. The chief concern is that compressed air may cause an embolism by forcing air into the bloodstream through a break in the skin or body opening. Because of this risk, OSHA has laid down several rules for using compressed air for cleaning purposes inside the work place. To quote the OSHA Instruction STD 1-13.1, “The requirements for dynamic flow are such that in the case when dead ending occurs a static pressure at the main orifice shall not exceed 30 psi. This requirement is necessary in order to prevent a back pressure buildup in case the nozzle is obstructed or dead ended.

An open pipe used for cleaning violates this rule. Yet everyday I speak to a customer who are using open pipes to remove chips, dust or water from parts. If a employees hand is trapped against the open tube, serious injury will result. EXAIR’s Super Air Nozzles are designed with multiple openings and fins to protect those openings, so that air always has a path to escape.

 

Nozzle Lineup

 

The other safety concern with an open pipe is the noise level.  Open pipes can produce noise levels over 100 dBA which violates OSHA’s standard for maximum Allowable Noise Exposure for even 2 hours per day.  EXAIR Super Air Nozzles will reduce noise levels to create a safer more productive work environment.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
Davewoerner@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_DW

 

Father’s Day Weekend 2013

Well, we have finally reached it; the weekend every dad has been looking forward to,  Father’s Day Weekend.  I myself have only been able to celebrate as a father for the past three years.  However, this is the first year that I will get to celebrate with both of my daughters.  Instead of waiting until Sunday to celebrate, I am going to start tonight.  The best way I know how,  is camping……  in the backyard.   That’s right, my oldest daughter has been wanting to go camping since the weather turned warm. She’s never been camping, so tonight we will rough it, in the backyard.

Camping under the stars

By roughing it, I do mean we will be having a fire in the fire pit, roasting S’mores,  and setting the futon mattress in the tent so I don’t have to sleep on the ground.  I’ve even picked up a vintage white gas lantern to try and get working for tonight too.  It’s a lantern that I purchased used and, so of course, it doesn’t work.   With any luck we will be camping under the stars with the flicker of an old white gas lantern.

bighat

Other than that, this will be just another weekend at the Farno household.  What are your plans for the upcoming weekend?

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Flute Lessons and Management Workshops

Last night I had the pleasure of attending my daughter’s first band concert. The annual holiday event featuring the fifth, then sixth grade bands. My daughter, and her classmates have generally all been playing their instruments for about four months.  The first practice as a complete band happened yesterday morning before school. They typically break into smaller groups with two or three different instruments together, but yesterday was the full band.  Their band leader, an experienced music teacher, scheduled the concert at a reasonable fifteen minutes of sounds for each grade’s band.

My daughter plays the flute, she attends band practice twice a week before school and individual flute lessons once per week. When we discuss her flute/band/lessons, she will reply by saying she really likes the flute and the lessons but band – not so much. Apparently she doesn’t enjoy the saxophones behind her squealing in her ear, getting up early twice a week or future visions of marching band uniforms (she wants to be in the orchestra). But she clearly benefits from both the band experience and the individual lessons. With the one-on-one lessons she learns more method and reading music and progresses faster, in band she learns about cooperation, other musical instruments and patience. It is easy for me to see, not as easy for her. For me, I am investing in her and want to help her be the best she can.  For her, it is difficult to see benefits from things you may not enjoy. But she is a willing participant (so far) in both practices, and being willing goes a long way toward reaping any benefits.

This video clip will either bring back memories for you or may show you what you have to look forward to…

Yesterday, my boss approached me with an eight session leadership seminar and asked if I may be interested. This after our HR Manager forwarded me information on a November class about being a better supervisor. I know, I know – “Take A  Hint Kirk!”. So you will be happy to know I have willingly accepted the latest learning opportunity.

But listen, I don’t particularly enjoy seminars and some of the exercises we will go through. I would rather spend time at work, within my department and develop my skills in that environment. I don’t necessarily want to be with a “coach” (seminar leaders) and participate in group workshops or raise my self-awareness.  In other words, just because I can see it is a great idea my daughter learns from multiple sources (private lessons and band practice), does not mean I think it is such a great idea for me (normal work environment and improvement seminars).

For me, self-reliance comes natural, my ability to offer help greatly exceeds my ability to ask for it or take advantage of it.  It may be that way for many of us, but one thing I have learned so far is the importance of continuing to learn and grow. And I must also realize the company is investing in me  to help me and to help them. So, knowing this gives me the willingness necessary to realize the benefits of these classes and I will be open to learning and practicing what is taught. It’s amazing what you can learn from raising kids isn’t it?

And just for the record, when my daughter said she wanted to try to play the flute – this is what I pulled from the vinyl collection first (poor kid)…

Kirk Edwards
Application Engineer
kirkedwards@exair.com