A Customer Service Experience

Upon moving to our new house, quite a distance from our old location, my wife and I were looking for a new “go to” restaurant that would be close to our new digs.

I did a Google search and found a place that was only a couple miles away and had good reviews. My wife and I went in and it was a quaint little place. The food was good, as expected, but the service was not.

We discussed the lackluster service and decided to go again about a week later hoping it was an isolated incident. On this visit we had a different server (which turned out to be the owner). Long story short, the service was again not good. It took a long time to place our order and receive our food.

I was ready to just write them off but my wife has a very soft and forgiving heart. So against my vote we go a third time. Which turned out to be a carbon copy of the 1st visit. With one great exception, we left after we had been there 25 minutes and our order was not taken. So, now we drive farther to our “old standby” because the service makes the difference to us.

The chart below is representative of reasons business’s lose customers.

Pie Chart

Fortunately, EXAIR is a customer centric organization.   EXAIR ensures that the staffing is present to handle your needs with the care and quickness you deserve and our culture dictates that we serve you effectively and efficiently!  With both a Customer Service and Application Engineering Department we can handle your questions and requests consistently and accurately. Speak with a real person, and learn from over 159 years worth of combined manufacturing experience.

Did you know that most items are available for same day shipping (limits on quantities) with orders that can be processed by 3:00PM Eastern Time for the USA?  Last but certainly not least EXAIR offer’s a 30 day money back guarantee on all our catalog items within 30 days of the purchase date!

When you are looking for quiet and efficient point of use compressed air products or static reduction devices, give us a call.  Experience the EXAIR difference first hand and receive the great customer service, products and attention you deserve!  We would enjoy hearing from you.

Steve Harrison
Application Engineer
Send me an email
Find us on the Web 
Follow me on Twitter
Like us on Facebook

Consider these Variables When Choosing Compressed Air Pipe Size

Here on the EXAIR blog we discuss pressure drops, correct plumbing, pipe sizing, and friction losses within your piping system from time to time.   We will generally even give recommendations on what size piping to use.  These are the variables that you will want to consider when selecting a piping size that will suit your need and give the ability to expand if needed.

The variables to know for a new piping run are as follows.

  • Flow Rate (SCFM) of demand side (products needing the supplied compressed air)
  • System Pressure (psig) – Safe operating pressure that will account for pressure drops.
  • Minimum Operating Pressure Allowed (psig) – Lowest pressure permitted by any demand side point of use product.
  • Total Length of Piping System (feet)
  • Piping Cost ($)
  • Installation Cost ($)
  • Operational Hours ( hr.)
  • Electical Costs ($/kwh)
  • Project Life (years) – Is there a planned expansion?

An equation can be used to calculate the diameter of pipe required for a known flow rate and allowable pressure drop.   The equation is shown below.

A = (144 x Q x Pa) / (V x 60 x (Pd + Pa)
Where:
A = Cross-Sectional are of the pipe bore. (sq. in.).
Q = Flow rate (cubic ft. / min of free air)
Pa = Prevailing atmospheric absolute pressure (psia)
Pd  = Compressor discharge gauge pressure (psig)
V = Design pipe velocity ( ft/sec)

If all of these variables are not known, there are also reference charts which will eliminate the variables needed to total flow rate required for the system, as well as the total length of the piping. The chart shown below was taken from EXAIR’s Knowledge Base.

Piping
Airflow Through 1/4″ Shed. 40 Pipe

Once the piping size is selected to meet the needs of the system the future potential of expansion should be taken into account and anticipated for.   If no expansion is planned, simply take your length of pipe and start looking at your cost per foot and installation costs.    If expansions are planned and known, consider supplying the equipment now and accounting for it if the additional capital expenditure is acceptable at this point.

The benefits to having properly sized compressed air lines for the entire facility and for the long term expansion goals makes life easier.   When production is increased, or when new machinery is added there is not a need to re-engineer the entire system in order to get enough capacity to that last machine.   If the main compressed air system is undersized then optimal performance for the facility will never be achieved.   By not taking the above variables into consideration or just using what is cheapest is simply setting the system up for failure and inefficiencies.   All of these considerations lead to an optimized compressed air system which leads to a sustainable utility.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer Manager
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF