Video Blog: Taking Care of Your Ion Air Gun

Welcome to the latest in our Application Engineering Video Series. In this installment, we’ll cover how to test and maintain an EXAIR Ion Air Gun.

To view Brian and Joe’s videos that I talked about, follow these links:

Ionizing Bar Maintenance

Static Meter Operation

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: http://www.exair.com
Blog: https://blog.exair.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Video Blog – How to Assemble Mounting Brackets to Filters & Regulatiors

EXAIR recommends filtered compressed air for maintenance free operation of our products. We have a complete line of water/dirt separators as well as oil removal filters. As our core focus is conservation of compressed air we also recommend regulating air pressure only as high as needed to get the job done. Click here to view our line of pressure regulators.

For todays blog I am going to demonstrate how to assemble mounting and coupling brackets to our filters and regulators. If you have any questions feel welcomed to call us a 1-800-903-9247.

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer

Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax   (513) 671-3363
Web: www.exair.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Update in Progress ….. Please read until finished.

As I write this blog I am waiting for my game console to finish a system update.  Oddly enough it was able to flip some tiny switch in my brain that gave me today’s blog topic.  EXAIR‘s brand new, updated, catalog has just been released this week!

Much like a software update is crucial, our catalog update is a vital step in the process of keeping all of our customers up to date on what we’ve been busy with over the past year.  This years catalog has hundreds of new models and product offerings.  Not to mention several new award winning products.

Not only does the catalog have all the model numbers and full color pictures of the product, but it also contains a vast majority of the technical data available on each product line.

So if you are still working with an older catalog from a few years ago, let us know and we’ll send you a brand new one out as quick as possible.  If you can’t wait for the United States Post Office the PDF version of the catalog and each of it’s individual sections is available for free download from our site.

I know I was extremely happy to get mine on my desk and all the tabs in it.  Hopefully it will bring some joy to other detail oriented engineers like Lee Evans mentioned in his blog post.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF 

M54 vs. M62

I once read something that identified what people look for in a product or purchase.  The idea was that different personality types look for different things.  One of the points that jumped out at me from the article was that engineers want details.

“Hmm…” I thought to myself.  “Do I do that?”

I thought back to the last vehicle I purchased.  I remember asking the seller if the engine was an M54 or an M62.

“What does that even mean” he said, sounding very confused.

I dialed it down a bit.

“Is it a 6 or 8 cylinder engine?”

“Oh, it’s a 6.  I think.”

Looking back on this (and the rest of the conversation), I agree that engineers most definitely want details.  Sometimes we are so detail oriented its necessary to take a step back and remember the rest of the world doesn’t look at things the way we do.  Fortunately, when working with EXAIR, you don’t need to dial it down.

I’ve been in and out of the test lab this week working through an application for an overseas customer.  They need specifications and values that aren’t defined in the catalog or spec sheets available on the web for our Super Air Knives (Air velocities at certain distances).  Fortunately, I understand the need and desire for the charts and figures.  So, I graciously agree to run the test and supply the data.

Anytime a new application is proposed there is always the possibility of being unable to meet the necessary performance standards, which can cause worry.  In the words of Winston Churchill, “Let our advance worry become advance thinking and planning.”

If you need to plan out a system with EXAIR components, we’re just a call away.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
leeevans@exair.com
@EXAIR_LE

Who’s Who In Customer Service…Is It You?

It’s been said that if you work for a company that sells a product or provides a service, then you’re in customer service…from accounting, to IT, to production, to shipping & receiving, and all points in between. Your company’s customer service/sales/application engineering folks are merely the face of the customer service entity that is your company. I know this not only because I currently work in application engineering, nor just because I have worked “behind the scenes” before, but also because I occasionally experience good customer service from our customers. Sound strange? Let me explain:

Recently, I got to talk to an engineer who has been tasked with making improvements to a production line. It just so happens, they make the razor blades that I use on this particular line. He liked the fact that I was familiar with his product, and I liked the fact that he was enthusiastic about his product. It’s not the cheapest razor blade on the shelf, but I’ve never minded paying more for its quality, and now, that’s been reinforced because I know that the folks who make them take great pride in their product.

At a previous job, I used to deal with a prominent bakery who made very popular cookies. We would often joke with them about needing a sample of their product so that we could ensure we were providing the right equipment. One time, their purchasing agent actually sent us some. Just like the razor blades, these cookies carry a premium price, which, just like the razor blades, is worth every penny to me.

In researching our family summer vacation this year, I found out that the folks at Disney are keen on empowering all of their employees, regardless of job title, to be the face of The Mouse, as it were. I found a review written by a more-than-satisfied visitor of the Magic Kingdom theme park, who had asked a maintenance worker for directions to a particular attraction. The worker could have just pointed them in the direction of the attraction, but instead, he hoisted his broom like a drum major’s baton, and led the family, parade-style, to their destination. The kids, of course, loved it, and the whole family enjoyed what Disney calls a “WOW moment.” Now, I can’t wait to find out what’s in store when we visit!

If you’ve ever had the occasion to call EXAIR, you may have noticed that we don’t have an automated phone system – during our normal business hours, you’ll talk to a real live person, every time, who will promptly get you to a real live person that can expertly answer your question, every time, and you’ll never get someone’s voice mail unless you ask for it. It may not be a “WOW moment” exactly, but I hear it’s getting rarer and rarer these days. Bottom line is, we want you to feel the same about EXAIR’s products as I feel about my particular brands of razor blades and favorite cookies.

Do you have an opportunity to connect with a customer of your company, regardless of what your job title is? You never know when that “touch” might lead to, or strengthen, a long and beneficial relationship with that customer. And wouldn’t that be nice?

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: http://www.exair.com
Blog: https://blog.exair.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

So What’s in A Job Description?

Job descriptions have evolved as important part in establishing pay scales. As with any well-meaning endeavor it comes with a downside; we’ve slipped into a culture of “it’s not my job“.  This profligates inefficiencies forcing employers to seek out alternatives to remain competitive giving birth to automation, outsourcing, contracted temps, and offshoring to name a few.

Paradigms are tough to change and sometimes it takes a crisis like what was experience by the automakers. The shock and awe of a collapsing market changed their corporate culture and with that they are making a comeback.

The mantra today is to  bring the jobs back. In reality some of those jobs will never come back because they have been replaced with automation and improved processes. What jobs we can bring back, need to be protected from the “not my job” syndrome otherwise more efficient alternatives will eradicate those too. Machines may be able to perform functions efficiently and consistently but they will not replace human intervention. There will always be a need for human assessment and direction to be applied through engagement within these functions.

Politicians are touting small businesses as the backbone of our economy. Why is that? Because with smaller groups, everyone from the owner to the laborer, has to work as a team. Focusing on the customer, everyone is cognizant of what needs to be done. Small businesses do not have access to large amounts of capital to cover up inefficiency. Thus the survival of the company is the job description of everyone.

EXAIR is a small business and we have the team concept which is why we have enjoyed growth since our inception 28 years ago. We would like you to challenge us with your application and witness firsthand the fruits of teamwork. Call one of our application engineers at 1-800-903-9247 and experience it for yourself.

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer

Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax   (513) 671-3363
Web: www.exair.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Smells

I can’t wait to get home tonight. Before I left the house to seek my fortune this morning, I put the basic ingredients for dinner in the crock pot: a couple of boneless, skinless chicken breasts, a can of chicken broth, and a packet of taco seasoning. When I walk in the door this evening, my house is gonna smell like my favorite Mexican restaurant.

Smells can be powerful, especially as memory-joggers. The smell of bacon frying always makes me think of Scout campouts. Lilac reminds me of spring, at my childhood home – the first thing my Dad had done when he bought the place was to plant a lilac bush outside the corner of the family room, where the odor couldn’t help but waft through the open windows. It’s like the house was designed for it.

You can get used to smells, too. Just for fun (well, also for patriotism, adventure, and fulfillment of my enlistment obligation), I used to go to sea on a Trident submarine, where we would spend 2-3 months completely submerged. The Boat had a scent all its own: a unique mixture of lube oil, amine, steam plant treatment chemicals, the body odor of 150+ sailors, etc. When you first climb down the ladder, it’s just…different. Not necessarily unpleasant; just different. The first time I returned from a patrol, though, I left my sea bag in the living room. The next morning, when I awoke and emerged from my bedroom, I encountered the foulest stench I think I’ve ever smelled…from then on, the sea bag stayed in the garage, and everything inside went to the laundromat or the trashcan the next morning.

Ozone has a particular, unmistakable odor, one that you won’t forget, but also one that most find hard to describe. I’ve heard it called sweet, pungent, metallic…I think it smells “clean,” perhaps because I associate it with electrostatic air cleaners.

As it turns out, knowing what ozone smells like is a valuable asset if you want to know if your EXAIR Static Eliminator is working properly. Assuming it’s readily accessible, the easiest and quickest test you can perform is to turn off the compressed air supply, leave the power supply energized, and sniff for the presence of ozone at the emitter point(s). Basically, if it’s making ozone, it’s working.

If you’re still not 100% sure, we have a Static Eliminator Cleaning and Maintenance Guide that will walk you through an electrical check of the equipment. It’s available upon request – just ask an Application Engineer.

Even if your Static Eliminator is up and running just like it did when it was new, right out of the box, though, there are other variables that might limit its effectiveness: air supply, mounting location, angle/direction of air flow, surface contact time (just to name the usual suspects) all come in to play. If you know your Static Eliminator is working properly, and you’re still not getting the results you’re looking for, perhaps it’s time to quantify the problem…that’s where our Static Meter can help. It allows you to easily and accurately measure the static charge on your material, both before and after Static Elimination. This data will be key to finding the problem, and determining the solution.

Of course, our Application Engineering team is eager to help, if you have any questions about installation, operation, “tips and tricks,” etc. Just know that you might get several different answers about what ozone smells like.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: http://www.exair.com
Blog: https://blog.exair.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

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