E-Vac for Epoxy Recycling

Recently, a manufacturer of custom magnetics called in about a special application. In the manufacturing of certain electronic systems, a very expensive, thick epoxy glue is used. They were exploring ways to be able to collect the excess after application.  They had used a system in the past and were looking to replicate it.  The previous system had an old boxy vacuum generator, and they asked us if we could provide a vacuum source that matched the performance specifications but in a more compact design.  After researching the specifications and a comprehensive comparison, we could offer the EXAIR model 810013 Inline E-Vac, generating up to 27 ” Hg of vacuum.  A basic sketch of the design concept is shown below-

Capture

By using the model 810013 to create a vacuum within the chamber, a strong suction can be generated at the tube inlet, strong enough to draw in the excess epoxy. The glue can be collected in the chamber for recycling and reuse, and because of the design, the glue does not pass through the E-Vac and cause any issues with build up or blockage that would hinder the performance, leading to the need to clean the unit.

In-LineE-VacFamily

The Many Sizes of E-Vac Models Available

EXAIR manufactures E-Vac’s for both porous and non-porous applications, as well as a line of Adjustable E-Vac Generators.  Smallest units use only 1.5 SCFM of 80 PSIG compressed air and the largest Adjustable E-Vac unit can pull 81 SCFM of air at open draw and 15″ Hg vacuum level setting.  With a wide range of sizes and types, there is a model available to meet your vacuum generation needs.

As a side note – the EXAIR Reversible Drum Vac, High Lift Reversible Drum Vac, Chip Trapper, and High Lift Chip Trapper all use this same basic principle of applying a vacuum to a chamber, but on a much larger scale, to turn a 5, 30, 55 or 110 gallon drum into an industrial liquid vacuum system.  The vacuum generating unit is of a different design, made specifically for the Industrial Housekeeping Products.

To discuss your process and how an EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Product can solve your toughest application issues, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or one of our other Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

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History of Compressed Air

The first use of compressed air did not come from compressors but the human lung. Healthy lungs can exert a pressure of .3 to 1.2 psi. Primitive people used the power of their lungs to propel darts from a blow gun. We use our lungs to blow off debris, stoke a fire, create sounds by voice and by musical instruments.

Around the third millennium B.C. , people began to melt metals such as gold, copper, tin and lead. Higher temperatures were needed requiring large volumes of air to stoke the furnaces: more than what the human lung could provide. Egyptian and Sumerian metallurgists used the wind directed through pipes for their work. Eventually tbellowhese were replaced by hand-operated bellows and then around 1500 B.C. the more efficient foot bellows came into use.

Bellows driven by foot or by water wheel proved a reliable compressor for more than 2,000 years. But as blast furnaces developed, so did the need for increased air compression. In 1762, John Smeaton built a water wheel-driven blowing cylinder that began to replace the bellows. Inventor John Wilkinson introduced an efficient blasting machine in England in 1776 and age of pneumatic energy became universally embraced.

Thus far, air compression was used mostly for the mining and the fabrication of metals. Blowing machines supplied a combustion blast to metallurgic furnaces and ventilation to underground mines. The idea of using compressed air to transmit energy became popular about 1800 when the newly invented pneumatic rock drill was used to connect Italy and France with an 8-mile rail tunnel under Mt. Cenis. This was a super feat for its time and garnered international interest spawning a flurry of inventions from air operated motors to clocks to beer dispensers.

Many engineers theorized compressed air as the energy distribution system of the future. However, electricity advocates held strong to their belief that pneumatic plants would eventually be trumped by electricity. Neither side was truly right and the debate still festers today. Much emphasis is being placed on energy conservation and the use of compressed air. The argument holds true today as it did back then, compressed air is a viable sources of transferring energy and will not go away. It’s prudent use of compressed air, as with any energy source, that is paramount.

Engine block blow off

The use of drilled or open pipe is energy wasteful. For 30 years EXAIR has been helping conserve compressed air with their engineered nozzles. These are designed to provide greater volumes of air than the volume of compressed air used which is a green alternative to drying, cooling, and blow off applications.

If you are interested in conserving your compressed air, one of our application engineers would be happy to assist you. Feel welcomed to give them a call at 1-800-903-9247 or click the chat icon in the upper left hand corner of this page.

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer
Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax (513) 671-3363
Web: http://www.exair.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

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