High Temperature Air Amplifier Cools High Tech Mirror Glass

We recently worked with a customer that manufactures mirrors for the automotive industry.  Today’s mirrors are evolving and becoming more and more complex, including functions such as auto-dimming, and navigation and backup camera display.

3666350134_a00b9e921f_z

Mirror manufacturing involves many steps, one step is the application of the reflective material.  Silver can be deposited chemically, but other materials such as aluminum and gold, and for scientific grade mirrors, silicon oxides and silicon nitrides are applied via an evaporative process within a vacuum chamber.  The metal is heated under the condition of vacuum until it vaporizes and is then deposited on the glass.  Many layers may be deposited depending on the mirror type and reflective properties desired.

Our customer came to us and said they were interested in utilizing the Super Air Amplifier technology in the glass cooling process. After reviewing all of the details of the application, including the ambient temperature conditions, we recommended the EXAIR High Temperature Air Amplifier, model 121021, as the right choice for the cooling application.

IMG_6185.JPG
Model 121021, High Temperature Air Amplifier

The  model 121021 High Temperature Air Amplifier was developed for moving hot air and to be able withstand high temperature ambient conditions. This special design is rated for environments up to 700°F and its surface is protected from heat stress by a mil-spec coating process developed for the aircraft industry. It uses just 8.1 SCFM of 80 PSIG compressed air, has an amplification ration of 18:1, and a sound level of only 72 dBA. This highly efficient and quiet air amplifier was the right choice, and the customer has reported back that they ‘have been working good’ in the application. They are also used to circulate hot air in ovens or keep even temperatures on large rotational molds. They also solve heat/cooling problems in glass manufacturing, primary metals, heat treating and power generation. They are the right choice for rugged, high temperature processes.

EXAIR makes other specialty Air Amplifiers, including models made for specific customer applications.  These include designs with flange mounting for exhausting flue gases from a  furnace and a design with a PTFE plug to help pull sticky material through a process while preventing the material from depositing on the Air Amplifier.

To discuss your application and how an Air Amplifier would help out, feel free to contact EXAIR and one our Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

Send me an email
Find us on the Web
Like us on Facebook
Twitter: @EXAIR_BB

 

Mirror Photo Credit – Steve Damron – via Creative Commons Licensei

A Perfect Fit for Primary Metal Manufacturing

Primary metal manufacturing and processing plants tend to have a variety of applications using compressed air, some of which can be quite large.  Our Finnish distributor found just such an application, using a high volume of compressed air under unsafe conditions.

20151111_122132
Homemade air gun at a metal manufacturing plant in Finland

In the photo above you can see a homemade air gun used to provide a high force blow off.  This unit has a welded cone on the end of a metal pipe using a ¼ turn ball valve to control the compressed air.  When the ball valve is turned the airflow remains constant until the operator returns the valve to the closed position.  This means that if the operator were to let go of the unit for any reason, the air gun would continue to blow, creating a safety hazard.

In addition to this concern, the welded cone at the end of the pipe provides no protection for high dead end pressures, creating a potential source of an air embolism if contacting human skin.  This can lead to difficulty breathing, chest pain, low blood pressure, or even a stroke (Source: MedScape; Venous Air Embolism; Updated December 8th, 2015).

The end user had accepted the risks associated with this homemade device because they were unaware of anything in the market capable of meeting the volume and force necessary to meet their application needs.  That is, until they were shown the EXAIR Super Blast Safety Air Gun model 1218.

Feeding the compressed air through an automatically closing ball valve, the 1218 removed the threat of unwanted flow from such a high force air gun.  The model 1218 also provides more than enough force and flow – the existing setup uses a 1-1/4” diameter orifice with a flow rate of 1986 SCFM (56,233 SLPM) with an unknown entrainment ratio; the 1218 has a flow rate of 460 SCFM (13,026 SLPM) with an entrainment ratio of 25:1, making the total directed flow equal to 11,500 SCFM (325,650 SLPM)!  This means the application can produce better or equal performance at a fraction of the compressed air consumption, thanks to the engineered design of EXAIR nozzles.  (See below for operational cost comparison.)

By converting to an EXAIR Super Blast Safety Air Gun this customer was able to add safety, increase performance, and lower operating costs.  If you have an application you think could benefit from better safety, performance, or operating cost, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

 

Compressed air costs are calculated as follows:

Previous setup:

1,986 SCFM compressed air consumption.  At a cost of $0.25/1000 SCF this equates to:

1,986 * ($0.25/1000) = $0.4965 for every minute of use

EXAIR model 1218:

460 SCFM compressed air consumption.  At the same cost of $0.25/1000 SCF this equates to:

460 * ($0.25/1000) = $0.115 for every minute of use

When comparing the two, the EXAIR model 1218 will provide an operational cost savings of almost 77%!

And, if you’re wondering how we determined the airflow through the existing setup, we used the charts below.

air calcs
Air calcs for the flow through a 1-1/4″ orifice