Step 2 of Optimizing Your Compressed Air System, Find & Fix Leaks

Over the past handful of blog posts I have blogged about topics like understanding the demand on your compressor, creating a system pressure profile,  and the effectiveness of filtering your compressed air.  These are all critical steps in ensuring your compressed air system is optimized for maximum efficiency.   These can also all fall into place with our Six Steps To Compressed Air Optimization.

EXAIR Six Steps To Optimizing Your Compressed Air System
EXAIR Six Steps To Optimizing Your Compressed Air System

Another factor in the six steps is identifying and addressing leaks within your system.   Finding leaks in your compressed air system can be done several ways, one of the oldest methods is to use a soap and water mixture to spray on every joint and see if there is a leak that causes bubbles.   The next method would be to use ball valves and pressure gauges to test each run of pipe to ensure they are holding their pressure over a period of time, similar to a leak down test.  The final method, and by far the easiest, would be to utilize our Ultrasonic Leak Detector.

This can be used to sense leaks in compressed air systems up to 20′ away and can also pin point a leak by closely monitoring each joint.  Neal Raker made a great video on how to use the Ultrasonic Leak Detector a while back and it is shown below.

If you have any questions on how to find leaks or how to optimize your compressed air system, give us a call.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Line Vac Assists Pump Bottle Assembling

We have a customer in the packaging industry who packages liquid soap into bottles. Part of the process involves loading the push-pump dispenser into a capping machine to be assembled to the bottle after filling.

The problem was that the push-pumps came in cardboard boxes which had to be wheeled over to the machine and dumped into the hopper. This was rather difficult as the top of the hopper on the capping machine was over eight feet off the ground. So, the customer went looking for some sort of solution to suck the pumps up out of the box and into his hopper.

Fortunately, he found EXAIR Corporation and our Line Vac product. We discussed the rate at which he needed to convey the product, the distance and the dimensions of the parts. All was well suited for the 4” Aluminum Line Vac Model 6086. The customer tried a few different configurations with the Line Vac and his hose because manipulating a 4” hose around isn’t all that easy to do. So the customer came up with an ingenious little waist-high platform with the vacuum feed on one side into which the parts could be slid into and vacuumed up to the hopper.

The customer is going to evaluate the effectiveness for this method of loading. He was planning on a time savings of at least 10 minutes per box to fill the hopper. He is also banking on the fact that it is now a safer application because an operator no longer has to climb a ladder to fill the hopper.

Are you in the packaging industry? Do you have an odd-shaped product that you could use to move from point A to point B rather quickly?  Perhaps you have a hopper that needs to be filled? Give one of our Application Engineers a call today to discuss your application.

Neal Raker
Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com