Prepping For The Heat. (Not Solar Flares)

Well, the first day of Spring is right around the corner.  It’s hard to believe that the Summer heat isn’t that far out for us here in Cincinnati.  Of course the first thing on my mind is hanging out outside with my daughters, and track days.  What isn’t on my mind is the heat that most production environments feel.  It most likely isn’t on your mind either, and won’t be until the heat is here and the machine is shutting down.

High Temp Cabinet Cooler

Why not be proactive and fill out a Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide so that we can help to prevent that down time in the Summer months?  Even though the temperatures aren’t as hot as they will be in a few months, the temperature differential will still allow us to calculate the heat load that is generated within the enclosure.

Sizing Guide

There’s no better time than now to start preventative measures to keeping your machines running.  Whether that is by installing a thermostat controlled Cabinet Cooler System, using a Chip Trapper to filter coolants or a Cold Gun Aircoolant System to keep a cutting tool cool.  All methods will help you to keep production up and lessen the down time and the costly replacements of your equipment.

If you have any questions on how we can help, feel free to contact us.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Winter Is No Longer Welcome In My Book

For those of you that read my blog posts it may be shocking that I haven’t blogged about a motorcycle since October 12, 2012.  That’s far too long! Over the winter months I have been working here and there on the motorcycle. Doing the normal maintenance like oil change, cleaning, sitting on it and making engine noises because weather isn’t permitting outside fun.

Of course, one of the things I have done is use my E-Vac Brake Bleeder.  After successfully bleeding my brakes I took my front suspension to a local motorcycle race shop to have it refreshed and new seals installed.  This is something I don’t have the correct tools for so I have to hand it over to an expert.  We then got to talking about bleeding brakes and getting all the bikes ready for this race season.  So I explained the E-Vac system to them and they didn’t believe it would work as easily as I stated.

After showing them a brief video of it I was able to see the wheels start spinning in their minds.  Suddenly they realized that they could use one in the shop and that there were applications that I didn’t think of.

The main application would be for bikes with a hydraulic clutch.  The clutch fluid needs to be changed out and the air needs to be bleed out of the system as a regular maintenance item just like the brake fluid.  The reason I hadn’t thought of it is because I have a cable driven clutch.

Hopefully with the weather today nearing 50 degrees I will be able to get an E Vac in their hands and let them see that the way they were bleeding fluids is obsolete and this is best, easiest, and fastest method to do so.

The old methods are shown in the video below.  (Please don’t try to siphon brake fluid by sucking on the brake line.  You don’t know where that line has been.)

If you have any applications you think we could help with please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Time for Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course

This Sunday afternoon I will be leaving for a two day trip to The Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course for two straight days of Motorcycle “Racing”.  It’s my second track riding event of the season and isn’t even actually a race.  For those that ride though they may understand how amazing it feels to be out on the track without having to worry about drivers that are distracted by cell phones or not seeing you.  This is because it’s only motorcycles and they even divide everyone one up per their skill level.   Here’s a good video of one of the Coach Riders having some fun with the Intermediate and Advanced group.  (Yes, the reason I chose this video is the music and I know the rider.  Also, yes, those are his dreadlocks you can see every now and then. )

The last time I was at Mid-Ohio I ran in Novice class on my SV 650.  I was told then that I should be running in Intermediate but the class was too full so just hang out and work on passing.  This year instead of going straight to intermediate I am hanging back in Novice for the beginning of the day just because I am still learning the ins and outs of the 600RR race bike I will be riding this year.

Along with the bikes the three of us going will be taking all of our protective gear, lots of snacks and drinks to keep our energy up, and an entire workshop of tools.   This is because we never like to be at the track and not get to ride because something breaks or comes loose.  I can guarantee our EXAIR E-Vac Motorcycle Brake Bleeder will even be in the tool box.

As long as everything goes according to plan I’ll be right back here on Wednesday and start working on another Friday blog that I can hopefully entertain all our readers with.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Missing parts

This past weekend I converted my SV 650 back to near stock equipment.  This meant changing the front end back to stock, the rear sets (foot pegs), and rear wheel.  While it wasn’t that hard I still have to make sure all the pieces were there (which they weren’t) and then make something work in their place.

The bike went back together smoothly and I made sure everything was snug, or at least I thought.   Then on my way in to EXAIR on Wednesday, I was on the highway and tried to shift when I found out there was no shift lever!  The shift linkage had come loose and was dangling by one end waiting to fall off.  I immediately pulled off to the side and tightened the linkage back up and got it to work.   When I checked the linkage before I left for the day, it appeared fine.   Then on the way home when I was on the highway, the same thing happened.  By the time I made it to the shoulder this time, the shift linkage was gone.  Luckily I was close to my exit to get off the highway so I cut through downtown Cincinnati. The only problem now was that I only had first gear which meant that I was red lining the engine to keep up with traffic and to be able to stop and go.  Other than everyone staring at me because my motorcycle was screaming like a banshee, I made it home safe and sound.  The picture below shows the part that fell off.

This reminded me of a time when I found a very valuable piece to be missing off a vacuum I use in the garage, the part that holds the filter on.   This little piece must have done the same as my shift linkage and vibrated free, then gotten thrown away with the debris.

If I would have been using an EXAIR Chip Vac or Heavy Duty Dry Vac, I wouldn’t have had to worry about missing pieces or vibrations from a motor causing something to come loose.  There’s no internal moving parts that are going to come loose or fall off.  Everything is compressed air driven so I don’t even have to worry about heat build-up, bearings, seals, or even the prongs on the plug getting bent.

It’s not just Industrial Housekeeping Products that have no internal moving parts, it’s virtually all of our products here at EXAIR.  So if you have a vacuum that has stopped working or lost some pieces, just give us a call and we’ll help find an EXAIR product that will work for your application.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF