Tamam.. Tamam..

“Tamam” is Turkish for ”Good” or “Okay”, and during a recent trip to Turkey I heard (and used) the word quite frequently.  Ivan Banks and I made the jump over the pond (and then some) to visit with distributors and hold product training.

As expected, the training was in depth and technical with a variety of application questions.  At times we would discuss application details using charts and catalog data, and other times we would review based on the experience of the engineers and salespeople around the table.  I’m pleased to say that the training was a success and the rapport built with our overseas colleagues is something priceless to EXAIR.

We spend a great deal of time showcasing our technical prowess and following through with our commitment to engineering and design improvement.  And, we are pleased to spend a good deal of time focusing on relationships as well.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
leeevans@exair.com
@EXAIR_LE

1,001 Uses For…

As I was cleaning my garage this weekend (yes, that’s what I do with long weekends), I found a bottle of vinegar, buried in the clutter on my workbench. See, a while back, I had needed to clean the streaks from some Plexiglas sheets, and discovered we were out of glass cleaner when I remembered reading something about using vinegar to clean glass. Despite the fact that I HATE the smell of vinegar, I decided to give it a try, and it worked. I also hate to put stuff back where it belongs, so it stayed on my workbench through the winter, but that’s another story.

Vinegar is pretty versatile. In fact, there’s a website that claims to have “1,001 Uses For White Distilled Vinegar” (I didn’t count), but it’s interesting that, before they list the “Cooking” applications, they go through: gardening (it’s a weed killer), cleaning (it also kills mold and bacteria), laundry (it’s a stain remover), health (you can use it to soothe a sunburn…if you can put up with the smell), automotive (it’s great for cleaning your wiper blades), and even pets: you can supposedly use it to keep cats out of the sandbox, or off the furniture. Note that this will probably work for me as well…did I mention I HATE the smell of vinegar?

You know what else is pretty versatile? EXAIR’s Air Amplifiers. I was perusing our Application Database (registration required) recently, and it seems we have an amazingly diverse assortment of successful uses for the Air Amplifier. The top three, in order, were:

#1: Cooling. The enormous amount of air entrained (up to 25 SCFM for every SCFM of compressed air consumed) makes the Super Air Amplifier an efficient choice to provide a large flow of cooling air for high heat removal.

#2: Blow-off/drying. They’re a popular and effective fit here due to the high velocity air flow they produce.

#3: Ventilation/exhaust. Again, air entrainment is the key: Our 8” Super Air Amplifier can pull in over 2,800 SCFM. For confined space ventilation, this means you can provide for 10 air exchanges per hour*, in a space up to 16,800 cubic feet (over 120,000 gallons).
*That’s from a typical Confined Space Entry procedure; please check with your Health & Safety folks for your own specific requirements.

Those three categories accounted for over half of our documented applications. Among the others:

  • A ¾” Super Air Amplifier was used as a “pick and place” device…this is normally a job for an E-Vac, but this customer was moving small pieces of fiber, about the size and consistency of a coffee filter, and we found the Super Air Amplifier was the only thing we had that would pick them up one at a time.
  • A 4” unit is being used to evenly distribute flavoring onto dog food.
  • Some are just plain fun. They’ve been used to add a wind effect to a dance floor. If you feel a sudden rush of wind blowing through a haunted house, it might be an Air Amplifier. The most amusing application has to be Roaring Banana Breath.

If you want to know more about Air Amplifiers, or if you think you have an application we haven’t heard of yet, please give us a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: http://www.exair.com
Blog: https://blog.exair.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Don’t Get Fired, Install A Cabinet Cooler System

If the weatherman is correct, it is going to be a sizzling hot summer this year with the southern tier states experiencing triple digit temperatures and the rest of the nation in the 90’s.

When it gets hot, controls fail. When controls fail, production shuts down. When production shuts down, the boss yells at you. When the boss yells at you, you tell him where to go. When you tell the boss where to go, you get fired. Don’t get fired. Install an EXAIR Cabinet Cooler system.

EXAIR Cabinet Cooler systems incorporate a Vortex Tube to produce cold air from compressed air – with no moving parts. The compact Cabinet Cooler system can be installed in minutes through a standard electrical knockout. NEMA 12, 4, and 4X Cabinet Cooler systems that match the NEMA rating of the enclosure are available in many cooling capacities for large and small control panels.

EXAIR has a staff of engineers that will assist you in selecting the proper cooler.

Give us a call at 1-800-903-9247.

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer

Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax   (513) 671-3363
Web: www.exair.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

What’s in store for Memorial Day weekend 2012?

Well EXAIR Blog readers, it’s that time of the year again.  The grass needs cut twice a year, evenings are lit with fire pits, tiki torches, and bug zappers, and the heat of the day has you looking for shade.  All of these can only mean one thing, it’s summertime which means it’s also Memorial Day weekend.

I believe the best Memorial Day blog EXAIR has released is one from one of our own veterans, Russ Bowman.  His blog, The Science of S’mores, talks about just a few events that are held nation wide on this weekend.  Then like most Americans do ending it with a nice relaxing family and friends cookout.  (I have to steal the video on S’mores)

So no matter where you are this weekend make sure to give thanks to our country’s veterans.  Also take some time to make sure and enjoy the freedom they helped us earn and keep by going out to one of your community events.   Here’s a link to just a handful of events that will be happening here in Cincinnati.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Money For Something…Good

My blog a few weeks ago was all about saving, and finding, money. I hadn’t exactly thought about where it was going to go…then I went to a meeting on Sunday afternoon, for Scouts who plan to attend the 2013 National Scout Jamboree. This is an event put on by the Boy Scouts of America every four years, and it isn’t your typical Scout Camp.

The National Jamboree dates back to 1937, and is historically attended by tens of thousands of Scouts, and visited by hundreds of thousands of guests, often including the President of the United States. It’s been held for over 30 years now at Fort A.P. Hill, an Army base in Virginia, but is moving next year to the brand-new Summit Bechtel Family National Scout Reserve, in West Virginia, which is the BSA’s newest High Adventure Base. Scouts will participate in a range of activities, such as rock climbing, zip lines, mountain biking, shooting sports, even SCUBA diving.

As you might imagine, this isn’t cheap, but it’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for my oldest son, who is just old enough to attend. Now, I’m totally sold on the Boy Scout program, so for me, I can’t think of a better “re-purposing” of funds that used to be spent on cable TV.

This was a great, and timely, reminder for me – not only of why it’s important to save money, but how important it is to evaluate what you’re spending money on, and what you get for it. In this case, I’m trading instant mindless entertainment and a promotion of a sedentary lifestyle for an opportunity to instill lofty values and a sense of adventure in a young man who is otherwise inundated by a culture of video games and computer screens. I expect the return on this investment to be priceless.  I’m already thinking about 2017, when his younger brother will be old enough to go.

At EXAIR, we’re focused on providing solutions, and helping you optimize your compressed air use. Consider this Blowoff Comparison, putting our Super Air Knife side-by-side with several other typical blow-off methods.

Where else can your company spend that extra money? I hope you make it count.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: http://www.exair.com
Blog: https://blog.exair.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

What is a good Line Vac Application?

Many times, we receive inquiries for Line Vac from customers who want to move 400 tons of some bulk material over 100 meters horizontal and 35 meters vertical into a silo (or some similar scenario). We have to let those customers know that our product does not have the capability to work at this capacity.  Such a conveying requirement would require the construction of a custom system with special feed hopper, piping, and blower assembly and sometimes even a cyclone separator at the end.

The Line Vac product is not made for such applications that require a great deal of customization. You may ask, “Well then, what is a good application for a Line Vac?”  I have just the example for you below.

Dear Sir/Madam,

 I am a mechanical design engineer working for a company that manufactures steel pipe systems. Part of the coating process involves externally blasting the pipes with steel shot. During that process a small amount of steel shot falls between the pipes, just outside the blasting cabinet. Presently, the shot is manually collected and recycled. See a photo of the area I am talking about below.

I am looking at installing a small hopper with one EXAIR Heavy Duty Line Vac conveyor at the bottom of the hopper. Another option is to use a Line Vac conveyor as a “vacuum cleaner”. Line Vac conveyor would convey the steel shot inside the blasting cabinet, through a 2-3m long rubber hose.

My estimate is that about half a bucket steel shot need to be recycled every 10 minutes.

1. Could you please suggest whether Heavy Duty Line Vac conveyor is the right choice for the application?

2. Could you recommend the proper size for my application?

Please contact me if you need additional information.

Regards,
Mr. Customer

When I replied to the customer, I did so with a confident, “Yes, our Heavy Duty Line Vac would be the best option for your application”. I went on to explain that the rate and volume of material that he wanted to convey as well as the distance were all well within the parameters of the Heavy Duty Line Vac capability. Beyond the conveying ability, the Heavy Duty Line Vac also has the added feature that it is made from a hardened tool steel alloy that will resist wear for a long time to come. Not a bad feature since the material being conveyed is made specifically to wear away at metals, oxidation and other debris on their pipe.

Since the customer had only 2 – 3 meters through which the material needed to travel and only about a half a bucket every 10 minutes, I recommended model 150125 (1-1/4” Heavy Duty Line Vac) for his application. He began using as an in-line vacuum cleaner, but then implemented a tapered bottom hopper and has been satisfied ever since.

Neal Raker
Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com

200,000 “replacement workers” Needed for Ohio Manufacturing Jobs

According to a 2010 Ohio Manufacturing Association report, manufacturing was the top private sector employer, comprising 14.11 percent of Ohio jobs in 2008, higher than health care and retail trade, second only to government. As older workers retire it is estimated 200,000 replacements will be needed.[1]

Further complicating matters is advancing technology, which requires new workers to have greater skills and problem-solving abilities. Today’s advanced manufacturing is not your father’s job. No longer is it a repetitive, mundane, minimal involvement job. Todays machinist are pretty much in control and responsible for his/her operation. Somewhat like a mini company within a company.

According to the bureau of labor statistics the annual mean wage for industries with the highest published employment, machinist wages are $40,000 which is comparable to computer operators, massage therapists, and social workers.[2]  The money is there, the jobs are going unfulfilled, and the future of these jobs is long-term. So why aren’t more folks gravitating to this industry…the negative stereotype of years past. Eric Burkland, president of the Ohio Manufacturing Association said  “We in manufacturing need to do a better job of communicating the opportunities that are available in manufacturing and we need our public partners to assist in that”[3]

Isothermal Community College (Spindale, North Carolina) is combating the metalworking industry’s skilled labor shortage by altering young people’s misperceptions about manufacturing and improve the industry’s view of community colleges. They have made a substantial investment in modern machine tools. Most community colleges are teaching with machines that have been donated to them. These are basically antiques which advanced machining techniques cannot be taught. Mike Saunders made the statement “To upgrade our workforce and get more people interested in manufacturing, it is going to take a financial commitment on the part of the colleges, support by the manufacturing community, and getting the word out to our high school students that manufacturing is a great career.

Ohio is not the only state with a skilled labor shortage. Throughout the United States there is an estimated 500,000 manufacturing jobs unfulfilled because of the lack of skilled labor. Despite the nay sayers, manufacturing is not dead in the U.S., it is a problem of staffing.

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer

Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax   (513) 671-3363
Web: www.exair.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair


[1]Dayton Daily News Sunday, August 21, 2011

[2]Bureau of Labor Statistics May 2011 National Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates United States

[3]Dayton Daily News Sunday, August 21, 2011

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