Compressed Air Uses In Industry

From pneumatic hand tools like impact wrenches or nail guns to larger scale industrial applications like stamping presses, the use of compressed air can be found in almost any industry. In fact, it is often referred to as a “fourth utility” next to water, gas and electric.

Compressed air is used in virtually every industry!

 

Take for example in construction, workers will use a pneumatic riveter to join steel framing because of the power generated by the tool over an electrically powered device, not to mention it provides for a safer operation by removing an electrical hazard. Many companies use compressed air operated diaphragm pumps or air motor driven pumps to move expensive or viscous liquid from one location to another. These types of pumps are self priming drawing the liquid in and provide positive displacement meaning they fill and empty the liquid chamber with the same amount of liquid through a common inlet and outlet.

Amusement parks have used compressed air in some capacity in the operation of thrill rides like roller coasters or to enhance the effect of certain attractions. Compressed air can be found in hospitals where it is used for specialized breathing treatments or to power surgical instruments in an operating room. Educational facilities use compressed air for laboratory testing. You can even find compressed air in the tires on your car. Basically, when you think about it, compressed air is being used just about anywhere.

Here at EXAIR, we manufacture Intelligent Compressed Air Products to help improve the efficiency in a wide variety of industrial operations. Whether you are looking to coat a surface with an atomized mist of liquid, conserve compressed air use and energy, cool an electrical enclosure, convey parts or dry material from one location to another or clean a conveyor belt or web, chances are we have a product that will fit your specific need.

EXAIR has been providing engineered solutions since 1983.

 

To discuss your particular application or for help selecting the best product, contact an application engineer at 800-903-9247 for assistance.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

 

Compressed Air Valves image courtesy of Shane Gorski via creative commons license.

Taking Yourself Out Of Your Comfort Zone

During the warmer Ohio weather months, April through October, my blog posts may include information about taking my motorcycle to some road course tracks (and now even a cold month or two).  I take my bike to open track days where (mostly) amateur riders can get on a proper race course. There are people on the track for the first time and people who race professionally.   They will generally divide the riders into several groups, Novice, Intermediate or Advanced.  The control riders/coaches at the track will help you to determine what group you should ride in and then help you throughout the day.   Below is a video of a control rider that is also a professional rider at Mid Ohio Sports Car Course.  (Don’t mind the music, it’s not my cup of tea either.)

For the novice group there are classes after each session, as well as skills practiced in every session.  This is to help teach the beginning track rider that the same habits you use on the street are not meant for the track, as well as how to be as safe as possible while being on the track.  This is the most watched and controlled group due to the fact it generally has the most riders and they are all the newest to the track.

For intermediate group there are optional classes and you just run your own pace.  They step up the skill level by not enforcing you to focus on a skill during each session or requiring you to go to a class after each session of the day.  The pace is considerably faster than novice and the only ways to get instruction are to either ask a control rider for it or if they see something to help you with they will generally stop you and coach you on how to do it better.

The final group is advanced, or race class.  This has the same elements as a professional race minus the grid at start-up.   There aren’t really any passing rules and the control riders are mainly all professional racers or former racers who can still make your head spin as they fly past you.  Similar to the intermediate group the only way you will get help is to ask for it.

For the past two years I have been running in the intermediate group and it is a serious meat grinder.  You will have people in there that are fast enough to be in advanced group, but are too scared.  As well as having people who let their ego and pride tell them they don’t need to learn anything from a novice class and should really be in novice learning as much as they can.  I stayed in Novice for over the first year of track riding that I had done.   Some people choose to never leave the novice group because that is exactly where they are comfortable.  They don’t want to worry about the other classes and are perfectly fine with not even being the fastest person in Novice.  This is perfectly acceptable for some, but I had to push myself out of my comfort zone in order to really enjoy the entire experience.  Even though I have been to the track several times now I am always out of my comfort zone in intermediate because there are always new people showing up and you never know when you will running with a group that should be racing, or a group that should be getting coached in novice.

Here at EXAIR we have customers that could fit into each of these groups also.   The customer who doesn’t know what an engineered solution is and doesn’t understand the cost of compressed air.  The intermediate user who has used some of our products in the past but is encountering new issues and knows that we can help lead them in the right direction.  As well as the advanced users who know exactly what they need and sometimes even request a special unit to fit their exact needs.

No matter the case, we can help as well as coach even the most advanced users of our products on how to use compressed air better.  If you are reading this and you don’t know the difference between a Super Air Nozzle and an open pipe, then give us a call.  We will help teach you the differences as well as make sure you understand the need for engineered solutions on your compressed air system.  It may be out of your comfort zone for the first few calls but we will make sure you get to the level you want to be so you get back into your comfort zone.

Brian Farno
Advanced Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

 

New Computer = New Problems

droll_500x439At home, my wife and I have had the same laptop for quite some time.  The computer is on its third hard drive and has started showing signs that it will be needing a fourth.  So, the hunt began for a new computer. As always, I started my research and tried to find something that would fit our requirements for a new family computer.

Once I was done with the online research, we went to two big box stores and looked at the computers.  The sad thing was the amount of knowledge we were met with from the sales staff.  At one retailer the employee simply read the tag on the computer line for line. ( I had already read the same tag).  The other retailer, we couldn’t even get help.  Granted, I never asked for help  but when someone is walking through looking at every laptop and writing notes down then you might think they could have questions or the potential to purchase.

So, we went on our way and (without a salesperson’s help) narrowed it down to 3 computers with additional research and investigation.  Went and physically looked at them and came up with one winner.  So we bought it.  I got it home, installed some software and the very next day it started showing problems.  It was to the point of calling the manufacturers support line.  The guy there was great, but the problem came back.  So I took the computer back and got another one, same PC just a new machine.  Took it home and found out I couldn’t install a piece of software because the software key was already used on the old PC.  So I started to try and find a contact number or chat for the company. After spending an hour on their website in an endless loop of links that said support, I finally found a way to reach them.

Once I dialed the phone and it rang I was greeted by an automated service, finally reached a real human being and spent the next 2 hours troubleshooting and getting the problem resolved. Once I reached a person the service was pretty decent, and the problem was resolved.

homepage

The point to this story is that you will never have those issues when dealing with EXAIR.  As soon as you go to our home page you see several ways to contact us including the phone number right on the page.  Not only that, we offer you to contact us via live chat, fax, email, or even snail mail if you want.  If you choose to call in, you will be greeted by a real live person, not an automated system or an automated recording of a live person. I know I have mentioned it time and time again, but here at EXAIR we try to make sure we set ourselves apart from other companies with the level of service and products we provide.  After working here for close to four years it is growing harder and harder to see how some businesses can stay alive with the level of service they provide. EXAIR has already done the research and investigating necessary to answer your questions, we are available at your call and we are eager to assist.

Contact us, we’ll get you taken care of.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

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