EXAIR Leads the Way with Standards and Certifications

For over 34 years, EXAIR has been the industry leader in providing Intelligent Compressed Air Products to the industrial marketplace. While much of our focus is to ensure our products are engineered to provide optimal performance, we are also dedicated to manufacturing products that meet a wide range of standards and directives to promote safety in relation to plant personnel.

 

For instance, all of our compressed air operated products meet or exceed OSHA Standards 29 CFR 1910.242(b), requiring that the outlet pressure of an open pipe, nozzle, air gun, etc., when used for cleaning purposes, must remain below 30 PSI when dead-ended against the skin, as well as Standard 29 CFR 1910.95(a) as a way to protect workers from job related injuries related to dangerous sound levels of 90 dBA and higher.

 

 


Many of our products are also CE Compliant, meeting the mandatory requirements for products intended to be sold in the European Economic Area or “EEA”. For example our Electronic Flow Control and Electronic Temperature Control (ETC) meet the EU (European Union) Low Voltage Directive 2006/95/EC.

 

 

EXAIR electrically powered devices, like our Static Eliminators and Digital Flowmeters for example, comply with the “Restriction of Hazardous Substances” or RoHS Directive 2011/65/EU, including the amendment outlined in the European Commission decision L 214/65.

 

 

We are also committed to providing material that supports the conflict mineral free rule to help aid in the relief of illegal trade of exotic materials, like tungsten, gold, tin and tantalum in the DRC region. Using the CMRT 4.20 template, we document our supply resources to ensure we provide conflict free products, as outlined in Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

 

Lastly, the European Union introduced the REACH program – Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals, as a method to register chemical substances being imported into the EU to protect people and the environment, per Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 Title I, Article 3.  Also noted in the program, Title II, Article 7, they state that any product with a substance intended to be released under normal operating conditions, must be registered for quantities totaling more than 1 metric ton per year. Since EXAIR products do not intentionally release or contain any such substances, registration to meet the program is not required.

 

If you have any questions about any of these Standards or Directives or about which EXAIR products comply, please feel free to contact an application engineer for assistance. We’d be happy to help!

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

EXAIR No-drip Atomizing Nozzles – Finalist for Flow Control Magazine Innovation Award

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EXAIR No Drip Atomizing Nozzle

In this summer of 2016, we are nearing the beginning of one of the largest sporting events on the planet, The 2016 Summer Olympics. At the heart of this celebration will be sporting events of all kinds. And in the tradition of the Olympics there is always a gold, silver and bronze winner to award the top three athletes in each event.

EXAIR is participating in a competition as well. It isn’t one of a sporting nature, but rather, one of ingenuity and innovation. Flow Control Magazine holds an annual competition for innovations in new products available in industry and we have entered the No Drip Atomizing Nozzle into the competition.

In general, Atomizing Nozzles are used for the application of high value fluids within industrial processes. In some cases where the Atomizing Nozzles are mounted above the target, residual fluid that is left inside the nozzle body can drip out when de-energized and cause un-wanted blemishes on the target surface.

EXAIR No Drip Atomizing Nozzles allow for external adjustment of compressed air and liquid inputs to adjust the liquid spray flow rate as well as droplet size for a wide range of applications. That’s pretty common amongst atomizing nozzles in general. So what is so innovative about the No-Drip Atomizing Nozzles?

We have found a way to control the on/off function of the atomizing spray which supports the no-drip feature as well as the atomizing flow with only one compressed air supply. Most other manufacturers require a nozzle that has a separate control for the small valve within the nozzle and another for the airflow that atomizes the fluid coming through. It is this innovation that dramatically improves the simplicity with which these nozzles can be installed into an application and controlled through typical air automation techniques. It was innovative enough that the US Patent Office granted EXAIR a patent on the design (Patent # 9156045). So, we’ve made the No-Drip Atomizing Nozzle available with 3 different spray patterns and 14 different liquid volume options to suit a wide variety of application need. Operating pressures can fall anywhere between 30 – 250 PSIG to atomize fluids up to 300 centipoise.

If you agree with the US Patent Office on the innovation and think that EXAIR’s No Drip Atomizing Nozzles should be a winner in this competition, we would appreciate your official vote.

Please vote for the EXAIR No Drip Atomizing Nozzles at this link to the Flow Control Magazine’s Innovation Awards page.

Thank you!

Neal Raker, International Sales Manager nealraker@exair.com

@EXAIR_NR

Bottling Line Can Run Efficiently by Taking a Few Simple Steps

I recently visited a local customer who bottles a liquid drink.  They do two different sizes, single serve and gallon bottles.  The main issues they were having is the gallon bottles were not dry enough after they come out of a cooling / rinse tunnel.  They currently had three different blow off devices in place outside of this cooling tunnel.  The cooling tunnel had hundreds of spray nozzles to both rinse and cool the gallons of liquid.

On the exit of the tunnel there was a blower driven air knife that was being powered by a high maintenance motor that was also sucking in non filtered air to blow the moisture off thee gallon jugs.  The blower was not producing high velocity air and the knife position could not be adjusted for maximum effectiveness due to the hard piping from the blower.

The bottles come out of the blower and go from a 60″ wide conveyor to a 24″ wide conveyor in about five feet of travel. The bottles are then funneled down even further into a single file line and then sped up and sent through two 90 degree bends to try and knock any residual water off them before going into the casing machine.

There were no other blow offs on the gallon line because they were concerned with their compressed air use.  The other two blow offs they had in place were on the single serve bottling line. On that line there were two points that had six separate clusters of a metal flat nozzle that was approximately 1″ wide and were all pointed at a different point of the cap to try and eliminate some moisture that would get trapped under the lip.

The single serve bottles would come out spaced approximately six inches apart but the nozzles were blowing continuously.  This was a very large waste of compressed air.  They could have very easily installed an EXAIR EFC on these supply lines to cut their usage by more than 50% of their current demand.   They then went past an open pipe blow off to help dry the final labeling point.   This was also on continuously which was another opportunity for air savings.

I recommended installing two Electronic Flow Control (EFC) units and replacing their existing nozzles and open pipe with the EXAIR model 1126 1″ Flat Super Air Nozzle outfitted with swivels to allow them to be positioned properly to reach under the bottle cap. Proper positioning, in many cases, increases the effectiveness of the nozzles and can get the job done with fewer nozzles installed. In this application I am confident we can get that bottle cap area blown off with only 2 nozzles.

By eliminating excessive nozzles and cycling compressed air on and off only as needed, the customer saves compressed air. I estimated it was enough compressed air to install a 24″ Deluxe Super Air Knife Kit to blow down on top of the gallon containers, which is the primary reason they asked me to visit in the first place. This will not only give them the 24″ Super Air Knife, but it will also include the crucial EFC and a filter separator to clean the compressed air and a pressure regulator to adjust the pressure down to the minimum necessary for success. All of these factors contribute to optimizing compressed air and using it effectively within anyone’s plant:

  • Eliminate open pipes and ineffective blow offs
  • Turn off compressed air whenever possible
  • Keep it clean to reduce wear and maintenance
  • Adjust the pressure to a minimum level for success

This is just one location in the entire facility where implementing the Electronic Flow Control and EXAIR engineered nozzles will help the customer to optimize their compressed air use.

If you would like to learn more or have questions on any of the EXAIR products mentioned in this blog, feel free to contact us.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Super Air Knife = Super Blow Off

Super Air Knife Blow Off

Earlier this morning I had the opportunity to guide an end user through the use of our Super Air Knife.

We began the discussion surrounding a blow off need during machining of a 5/8″ blind hole.  The end user needed a strong, consistent air flow to remove debris over a variable surface area.  We considered using Super Air Nozzles, but the variable location of the blind hole at different times in the process proved to warrant this solution impractical.

We arrived back to the original idea of using a Super Air Knife to blow out the blind holes.  To be sure we had the same conceptual view of the application, the engineer with whom I spoke sent a component photo (above).  One of the notes we made about the setup above was to increase the distance between the armature and the Super Air Knife, just a bit.  We generally advise to provide at least 3-6” of space between the Super Air Knife and the surface/material to be blown off because this allows the Super Air Knife to entrain more surrounding air.  Referencing the actuator on the left side of the drawing, it was decided to raise the armature to allow for this spacing.

This setup will be repeated on the opposite side of the machine to ensure satisfactory quality of the parts being made.  We also went on to discuss the Electronic Flow Controller and the possibilities of controlling the Super Air Knives through already installed PLCs (we are fond of both, for efficiency purposes).

This application was an excellent example of the versatility of a Super Air Knife.  If you have an application question or related need, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

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