Back To The Basics (of compressed air)…And The Track

The past several weeks I have been finding myself doing things the more complicated way (I  know how that sounds odd – an engineer that prefers to do things the hard way). Over the weekend I took a brief ride on the motorcycle for a short 15 minute trip that I found to be satisfying, even if it is less direct and a more out-of-the-way route for getting my errands complete.   The route runs past the local university of Mount Saint Joseph, down a winding road that has no houses and only one business, the rest is all woods and a creek.  Finally, this route runs along the mighty Ohio river and back up a steep winding road near my house.

While I have been worrying about all the projects and errands which need to be completed, this more complicated route gives me a moment to decompress and remember that my family at home and few other things are all I need.  Once  I was reminded of that and got some perspective which allowed me to “keep calm and carry on” I proceeded to break my projects and errands down into smaller pieces and everything will start to come together.

I now have a to do list at home as well as a refreshed list at EXAIR of all the items I need to do.   The list at home is considerably more fun as it all involves getting my “new to me” track bike ready for this season.  20140506_134512That’s right, it’s right around the corner, the first track weekend of 2014.  So expect to see some more motorcycle blogs coming and hopefully more ways to use EXAIR products while working on them. It was these newly developed lists that helped me reorganize and get back on track for the new season, sometimes a list is necessary in order to gain perspective, prioritize and begin to take action.

On that note, EXAIR has a list to help you gain perspective, prioritize and take some action toward getting your compressed air system optimized. Our systematic approach using the Six Steps To Compressed Air Optimization has been developed to help you save your compressed air,your hearing, and your money. By following these steps you can lower your compressed air use, minimize workplace noise exposure (OSHA will be happy) and save money on this important utility.

6 steps

 

If you have ever thought of reducing your compressed air costs, use our list to help you gain perspective on this simple process and take some positive steps toward saving your facility some money.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

 

Dear Joe…….

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Well, Friday, March 28, 2014 marked the end of an era here at EXAIR.  It was the official last day of Joe Panfalone, @EXAIR_JP, #DearJoe.  I know Joe has blogged about his retirement, but in case you didn’t know, he has been with EXAIR for 19 years straight.   That is almost longer than Professor Penurious’ Co-Op has been alive.

When I first started here at EXAIR four years ago Joe would always tell me, just remember kid, I voted for you.  The trick is he wouldn’t say whether he voted to hire me or not to hire me, just that he voted.   I have a feeling that I was to Joe, like Dennis the Menace was to Mr. Wilson.

No matter what the question or what he was doing, I wanted to know.  Joe was more than willing to tolerate all the questions, too. It’s almost like he has had kids before and that his patience has been tried before.  No matter what would happen, he would just keep going back to the fact that he voted for me.

Joe hasn’t only taught me a lot about applications, theory behind product, and how to skirt around HR, he has taught me how to be a better manager, not to sweat the small stuff, and that when you find something good you better hold on to it for dear life.

One of the many things Joe is known for around here is his extensive palate; in other words, he’ll eat anything.  Even my wife knows that if we have some leftovers or cake that we don’t want to eat ourselves, just send it in and Joe will eat it.  He even returns Tupperware clean as a whistle with a note saying “More Please”.

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The fact is, I am extremely excited to see Joe move on to the next chapter of his life.   I can only hope that it will be better than he has made all of ours.

One last thing, Joe did make the mistake of promising to meet up this Spring / Summer and help me teach my oldest daughter how to fish.  (Little does he know he’ll pretty much have to teach me, too!)

 

Thanks for everything Joe!

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

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