EXAIR Product Videos

There are many ways to find information about the EXAIR product line. We have the website, catalog and some formal videos. We  also like to offer to all of our customers the tried and true option to discuss any questions they might have on the use, maintenance, and installation of any EXAIR product even though the media may change from phone to e-mail or live chat.  Expanding the way you can find some of this information is our next committment and we are going to start posting some more informal product videos.   They will all be done by our Application Engineers and will cover a variety of topics and products.   Such as utilizing a Universal Air Knife Mounting System, how to install and use an Electronic Flow Control, show Vortex Tube cold air production and so on. One Vortex Tube video is shown below and was submitted on one of Kirk Edwards’ blogs.

We have come up with a few ideas ourselves but would like to enlist some help from you –  our customers, blog readers, Facebook friends,  and Twitter followers.  Tell us what you would like to see.  As long as we have the means to set it up and make it happen in-house we’ll put the topic on our list.  If you’re local to Cincinnati and want us to come to your site and make a video there we may be able to work that out too.  Just contact us.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_BF

Miles and Miles

A phrase I’ve often heard is “Go the extra mile”.  I’ve heard it so much it’s almost over-played, but the meaning is still relevant.  

Consider this: If you start where you are right now and apply the habit of going the extra mile, you will inevitably be in better and better positions.  Rome wasn’t built in a day, fortunes are seldom acquired overnight, and being your best takes dedication and proper direction. 

Throughout this last week I’ve been involved with several applications that deal with measurements or values that I don’t normally encounter, one of which needed a specific speed of air (in MPH) from our air amplifiers.  Not only was the speed specific, but the distance away from the amplifier was also specific.  This meant that the speed of the air had to be calculated using the diameter of the airflow at the specified distance.  The distance was outside of our empirical data on hand, so I had to go to the test lab.

A quick setup and a few repeatable tests proved worthwhile to determine the values I needed.  Using the test data and the desired speed, I calculated the appropriate airflow needed at the specified distance.  I then determined the amplification ratio necessary to achieve this air volume and provided this information to the customer in form of a necessary model number and a variety of setup options.

It was gratifying to be able to help this customer, and it felt good to provide something that wasn’t expected, but it’s a standard in the engineering department at EXAIR.  We back up our products and we support our customers along the way.  And along the way we’ve found that it’s never crowded along the extra mile.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
leeevans@exair.com
@EXAIR_LE

Compressed Air Is Cool

Recently, I had the pleasure of assisting an engineer whose company makes honing tools.  One particular item is a large, heat treated, alloy steel part.  When it comes out of the furnace, it’s over 1,700°F.  Needless to say, it has to cool off quite a bit before they can do anything with it.  He was doing the best he could with some large shop fans when he called me to pursue the possibility of doing it quicker with engineered compressed air products.  His goal was to cool the part to 600°F in fifteen minutes.

For those of you without an engineering background (or for you engineers who “phoned it in” during Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow), there are 2 components to convective heat transfer: temperature differential, and flow of the cooling medium.  Increase either or both of these, and you get better results.

In this particular case, the temperature differential between the part (1,700°F) and ambient (80°F) is already huge.  Now, a Vortex Tube device could cool the air an additional 50° or so, but that wouldn’t really have much overall effect.  That left us looking at increasing the air flow.

We considered several options, but the Super Air Knife’s 40:1 amplification ratio made it the obvious choice for maximizing flow, while minimizing consumption.   I didn’t do the CAD drawings (although CAD is my favorite video game), but I supplied my customer with the 3D models he needed to design his system.  He incorporated three 12” Super Air Knives, supplied with plumbing kits.  He mounted them with our Universal Air Knife Mounting Systems.  It made for a very nice looking little rig.

Based on the initial data, my heat transfer calculations were in the “close but no cigar” range – making some conservative assumptions, I figured it could take as long as half an hour to reach 600°F.  When all was said & done, though, the cooling performance was a great improvement over the fans, and even better than my calculations indicated it would be – the system actually cooled the part to 200°F in twenty minutes.  Which was curious, because I actually paid attention in, did well in, and, dare I add, even enjoyed HT/FF.

As I come to grips with my failure to know everything, I’m encouraged that the as-yet unknown variables were skewed in our favor.  Yeah; compressed air is cool.  Even cooler than I thought.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: www.exair.com
Blog: https://blog.exair.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Finding Team Players

Many moons ago in a previous life, I attended a seminar on “Hiring & Firing” . The thing that stuck with me over the years is the disparity between the criteria for hiring vs. that for firing. According to a survey of  the top 10 reasons for hiring, technical skills topped the list and personality was nearly last. Interestingly, of the top 10 reasons for firing, technical competence was last and personality was first. The point the lecturer was making is the need to do a better job at hiring. If you are not firing for the same reasons that you hire then you need to evaluate your priorities.

Today many companies administer personality as well as aptitude tests. Some go as far as to use the Rorshach ink spot test.

EXAIR Corporation prides itself in its selection of employees. Not only are they technically competant, they are team players willing to go the extra mile for each other and the customer.

Teamwork is one of EXAIR’s hallmarks and what has made us so successful in serving our customers. The way we handle ourselves is obvious to even those that have not  met us face to face. Here is a tweet I received exemplifies the perception of us.

                      ——————————————————————————————————

RPMconsultants @bernardtmartin #FF @EXAIR @EXAIR_JP @EXAIR_KE @airknives @EXAIR_BF << how a company works as a TEAM ★★★★★8 Apr

                     ———————————————————————————————————-

If you would like to challenge our team with your application, call us at 1-800-903-9247 and ask for an application engineer.

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer

Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax   (513) 671-3363
Web: www.exair.com 
Twitter: www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Wise Words

I have a routine in the morning as almost everyone does.  Part of that routine is picking a book from my bookshelf and thumbing through the pages while I have breakfast with my son.  I’m always looking for something motivational or inspiring to send out to my family and friends.  I find it helpful to have a positive thought to revert to throughout the day and I enjoy sharing that with others.

Given this habit, I’m always on the lookout for wise words wherever I am and one of the first things I saw when I started at EXAIR was a quote next to an engineer’s desk.  It reads:  “You must have long-term goals to keep from being frustrated by short-term failures.”  Wise words indeed.

Failure is inevitable with any undertaking, but can be a great thing sometimes.  Knowledge and growth are byproducts of failure when handled the right way, and that’s how we handle things at EXAIR. 

At EXAIR, we strive to do the best and be the best which must include long-term goals.  Part of a long-term goal is a plan to provide structure and a clear definition of the right direction to take.  If you have questions about the right direction to take with your project, contact an application engineer.  We’ll help you plan it out. 

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
leeevans@exair.com
@EXAIR_LE

Nostalgic About Longevity

Calling all geologists, rock-hounds, and science buffs:  I just got word that the GeoFair will be held at the Cincinnati Gardens in a few weeks.  Scouts (Cub, Boy, Girl, etc.) get in free if they wear their uniforms.  Webelos (4th/5th Grade Cub Scouts) can even earn their Geology Pin there.  As a Webelos Den Leader, this catches my interest, and rightly so.  What really excites me about it, though, is this will be my second time there.  You see, back in the 1970’s, my Webelos Den Leader took us to this event.  On a Saturday in May.  At the Cincinnati Gardens.  Now, I’m not that old – it was the LATE 1970’s, mind you – but that’s an impressive run, don’t you think?

I’m not going to hazard a guess as to why the GeoFair has stuck around at the same time of year, in the same building, for so long.  To the best of my recollection (and this is from a 10-year old boy from The Sticks’ perspective), it was a huge, well-produced event.  Perhaps the dedication and faithfulness of geologists and rock-hounds cannot be underestimated.  One might suspect it’s a combination of the two.

Not only did this get me nostalgic, thinking about sharing this experience with my Scouts, it also made me think about longevity.  And its causes.  My doctor tells me to eat right, move around a little more, don’t start smoking, etc., and, barring genetic predisposition or tragedy, I should live a good, long life.  As long as my wife and I continue to share, respect, and listen (I mean really listen, guys – not just nod & think about what we’re going to say next), then we should be very happy together for the rest of our good, long lives.

In business, it’s all about cultivating the kind of loyalty that’s demonstrated by the folks who continue to make the GeoFair a successful annual event.  Products and services are purchased every day.  Thing is, except in very rare cases, someone else makes or does the same thing as you, and they’re vying for the same allegiance from customers as you.  So what can set you apart?

Innovation.  Make something new.  Then make it better.  Think “better mousetrap.”  For example, look through EXAIR’s catalog, and you’ll find numerous “Product of the Year” nods, and a nomination for last year’s “Golden Mousetrap” award for the Chip Trapper.

Customer Service.  Again, products and services are purchased every day.  If you want to sell, you have to develop the relationship.  Make yourself the one they think of when a need for your product or service arises.  When you call EXAIR, a real live Customer Service Specialist picks up the phone, ready to serve you in real time.  If you have detailed questions, you’ll be quickly transferred to a real live Application Engineer, ready to serve you in real time.  As long as we’re open, you’ll never get anyone’s voice mail unless you specifically ask for it.

Availability.  If products are sold every day, they need to be available every day.  “If I wanted it tomorrow, I’d have called tomorrow!”  Sound familiar?  No problems here.  If it’s in our catalog, we’ll ship it the same day with an order by 3pm EST.  Specials and custom orders can be done fairly quickly as well.

This list isn’t all-inclusive, but these are some of the biggies that work for EXAIR and set us apart.  Our company’s President is fond of saying “claims are easy; proof is hard.”  Accept that challenge every day.  It’s a great place to start.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: www.exair.com
Blog: https://blog.exair.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Forging Process Could Use a Little Help From Super Air Nozzles

Take a look at the following video submitted by a potential new customer who operates a steel forge. In the video, you will see a trimming operation of a three-pound part that is somewhat intensive in terms of manual manipulation of the work piece.

The customer contacted me because he was looking for a way to speed up the operation to increase productivity. His thought was that if he could eliminate the amount of time the operator spent moving the trimmed part and the scrap out of the die area that he could easily achieve his goal.

After viewing the video submitted by the customer a few times to get a good feel for where things in the process needed to go after the trimming die comes down, I was able to come up with a fairly simple part ejection plan. The plan would consist of (2) model 1112 (3/4 NPT Super Air Nozzles) situated around the die at specific locations. The first one would be placed below the die area where the trimmed part falls after trimming (notice the manual pushing paddle set up on the die in the video). The nozzle would cycle on for a fraction of a second. Just long enough for the part to clear the die and move onto the chip conveyor located in the background.

Immediately after the die comes back up into its top-most resting position, the second air nozzle would be positioned to the left side of the die to blow off the trimmed scrap ring into a waiting scrap bin for re-processing. Both air nozzles would be controlled by solenoid valves which would receive input from the die press to know when to cycle on and off. A localized air storage tank, close to the air nozzles would also help keep the blowing performance at its proper working pressure during each cycle. The air tank would act as a capacitor to dump the energy needed for the split second need for each stamping cycle. The air storage tank keeps the nozzles at pressure and prevents the application from using the existing building pipe network from acting as the reservoir. A much more effective method for intermittent compressed air need as would be the case in this application.

Many people wonder why we would have such large air nozzles in our product line up. Blowing around a 3 pound hunk of metal in a real production environment is one really good reason. It makes for a simple, non-contact blowing operation that is easy to set up and simple to use.

Neal Raker
Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com

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