EXAIR’s EFC is THE Way to Save Compressed Air

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Compressed air is the most expensive utility for most industrial facilities. The energy costs associated with the generation of compressed air can be very high. Because of this, EXAIR manufactures a wide range of products geared towards reducing your overall compressed air consumption.

The best way to save compressed air is to simply turn it off when it’s not being used. This might seem pretty simple, but there may be processes in your facility where this couldn’t be achieved by just turning a valve. In applications where product is traveling along a conveyor, and must be dried, cooled, or blown off, there is likely some spacing in between the parts. It isn’t necessary to keep the blowoff running constantly if there’s periods of intermittent spacing. To help reduce the overall load on the air compressor, implementing a solution to shut the air off in between each part can have a dramatic impact. EXAIR’s Electronic Flow Control, or EFC, is designed to improve efficiency by reducing overall compressed air usage. It utilizes a photoelectric sensor that detects when the part is present. When it’s not, it triggers a solenoid valve to close and shut off the compressed air supply.

efcapp

 

Let’s take a look at an example that shows just how much air (and $$) an EFC can save. We had a manufacturer of car bumpers that was using a Model 112060 60” Super Ion Air Knife supplied at 40 PSIG to remove dust prior to a painting operation. The bumpers were moving at about 10’/minute and had 1’ of spacing in between each part. The bumpers are only under the blowoff for 10 seconds, while 6 seconds passed with no part present. With a (3) shift operation, this translates to 1,440 minutes of nonstop compressed air usage per day.

A 60” Super Ion Air Knife will consume 102 scfm at 40 PSIG. Their current method was using a total of 146,880 SCFM.

102 SCFM x 1,440 minutes = 146,880 SCF

With the EFC installed, the air was shut off for 6 seconds reducing the airflow by 37.5%. With the EFC installed, the compressed air consumption per day was reduced to 91,800 SCF.

146,880 SCF x .625 = 91,800 SCF

As a general rule of thumb, compressed air costs $0.25/1,000 SCF. By saving 55,080 SCF per day, this manufacturer was able to save $13.77 per day. Since this was a 24 hour/day shift running 7 day/week, total savings for the year came in at $5,012.28. This easily recoups the costs of the EFC and then begins to pay you in less than 6 months.

55,080 SCF x ($0.25/1,000 SCF) = $13.77

$13.77 x 7 days/week x 52 weeks/year = $5,012.28

The EFC models available from stock can accommodate flows up to 350 SCFM. For applications requiring more compressed air, EFCs with dual solenoids are also available. If you have an application in one or more of your processes where intermittent compressed air use could help save you money, give us a call. We’d be happy to take a look at the application and help determine just how quickly the EFC could start paying YOU!

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mal : TylerDaniel@Exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Video Blog: The Monetary Benefits of an Engineered Solution

This video highlights the value and benefits of an engineered blow off solution.  We take a homemade open pipe blowoff and replace it with an EXAIR model 1100 Super Air Nozzle.  This air nozzle is then controlled through our Electronic Flow Controller, allowing for intermittent On/Off of the compressed air flow.  And, these solutions are wirelessly monitored via Zigbee network using our Wireless Digital Flowmeter.  Implementing these solutions results in a compressed air reduction of over 90%!!!

 

Full calculations along with supporting flow values (pulled from the same data shown in the video above) are shown below.

Screengrab of the flow values shown in the video above. Click for larger image.

The open pipe:

The first compressed air flow values to show up on the EXAIR Logger are for the open pipe blow off.  At 1 BAR operating pressure, this “solution” consumes 22.3 SCFM of compressed air.  At a cost of $0.25 for every 1,000 cubic feet of compressed air, this nozzle will cost $695.76 to operate 8 hours per day, 5 days per week, 52 weeks per year.

The engineered EXAIR Super Air Nozzle

Model 1100 EXAIR Super Air Nozzles consumes 4.7 SCFM at an operating pressure of 1 BAR – a reduction of 79% compared to the open pipe.  These savings prove out in terms of operating cost as well – $146.64 per year, compared to $695.76.

The engineered EXAIR Super Air Nozzle with Electronic Flow Control (EFC)

By controlling the “ON” time for this application with an EFC, we are only blowing for 32% of the time for each minute of operation which changes the required compressed air flow from 4.7 SCFM to a peak value of 1.5 SCFM. This control saves an additional 68% of compressed air flow.  And, these savings are compounded by eliminating the need for constant compressed air flow.  Total annual operating cost for the EXAIR 1100 Super Air Nozzle with Electronic Flow Control is just $46.80.

Implementing an engineered solution can have a TREMENDOUS impact on energy costs and operating costs in your facility.  Compressed air is the most expensive utility to produce and consume, making the impact of proper solutions of high value to any business.  Let us help you utilize engineered compressed air solutions in your facility by contacting an EXAIR Application Engineer today.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

Reducing Lubricant in a Blanking Operation

We recently chatted with a customer that was looking to improve the lubrication system for multiple blanking lines.  Blanking involves the cutting of sheet metal in a single step, to separate the piece form the surrounding stock. The part that is cut out is the desired product and  is called the ‘blank.’  This operation can be moderate to fast in speed, and the process creates heat, so a lubricant is used to cool and decrease the wear on the tooling.  Our customer was looking for a better way to apply the lubricant.

We proposed the model AN2010SS, a No Drip, internal mix, narrow angle, round fan Atomizing Nozzle.  The nozzle uses compressed air to create a mist of the liquid with very fine droplet size. When using for the  lubricant, a fine layer can be applied over the entire surface without areas of over coverage and waste.  This leads to lower costs for lubricant, and less mess on the blanks.

No Drip Atomizing Nozzle
No Drip Atomizing Nozzle

To simplify the process, the No Drip model was chosen. The No Drip style has the added benefit of positively stopping liquid flow when the compressed air is turned off.  There is no need to independently control the liquid flow via a control system and valve.

Finally, to control the compressed air side, we recommend the Electronic Flow Control (EFC.)  Utilizing a photoelectric sensor, the open position of the press can be detected and using 1 of many program options, the compressed air can be turned on and off to accurately control the application of the lubricant.  Due to the excessive amount of lubricant being used, the customer was applying every other cycle.  The first blank would be overly lubricated so that there would be some remaining for the next.  With the Atomizing Nozzle and EFC, the right amount of lubricant can be applied for each cycle.  The result is reduced lubricant usage, and a better operation.

EFCp4

If you have questions regarding Atomizing Nozzles or any EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air® Product, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or one of our Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

Send me an email
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Twitter: @EXAIR_BB

Many Ways to $ave on Compressed Air Costs

Using compressed air in the plant is common for many types of processes.  Typical uses are drying, cooling, cleaning and conveying. Compressed air does have a cost to consider, and there are many ways to keep the usage and the costs as low as possible.  The first step is to use an EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Product, which has been engineered to provide the most performance while using the least amount of compressed air. The next step is to control the use of the air, to only have it on when needed.

EXAIR offers the EFC – Electronic Flow Control.  It offers the most comprehensive method to maximize the efficiency of compressed air usage.  It combines a photoelectric sensor with a timing control that operates a solenoid valve to turn on and off the air as required. With 8 different program types, an on/off mode that works with any process can be programmed ensuring that the minimum amount of compressed air is used.  You can use the online EFC Savings Calculator to see how quickly the savings add up!

EFCp4
EFC – Electronic Flow Control

Another method would be to use a solenoid valve with some other method of control. Depending on the process, the solenoid could be energized via a machine control output, or as simple as an electrical push button station. EXAIR offers solenoid valves in a variety of flow rates (from 40 to 350 SCFM) and voltages (24 VDC, 120 VAC and 240 VAC) to match the air flow requirements of the products we provide, while integrating into the facility and available supply voltages.

For control of the Cabinet Cooler Systems, the ETC – Electronic Temperature Control, uses a thermocouple to measure cabinet temperature and cycle the system on and off to maintain a precise cabinet temperature, and provides a digital readout of the internal temperatures and on the fly adjustment.  Also available is the Thermostat Control models, which utilize an adjustable bimetallic thermostat to control the solenoid valve, also cycling the unit on and off as needed to maintain a set cabinet temperature.

ETC CC
ETC – Electronic Temperature Control

There are several manual methods that can be used to control the compressed air.  A simple valve can be used to turn the air off when not needed, whether at the end of the work day, at break time, or whenever the air isn’t required.  We offer several options, from a foot controlled valve, to a magnetic base with on/off valve, to a simple quarter turn ball valve.

footpedalvalve (2)dualstand (2) manual_valves (2)

 

To discuss your processes and how an EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Product can control the air supply and save you money, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or one of our other Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

Send me an email
Find us on the Web
Like us on Facebook
Twitter: @EXAIR_BB

 

 

Get the Right Tool With the Features You Want

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This year I made a decision to buy a new lawn mower. The previous one I had been using was purchased new about 15 years ago. Just like any new thing any technical oriented type of person buys, you have your own, personal critique of the things you like and don’t like about the current tool that affects your buying choices for the new one.

My old lawn mower was a front wheeled, self-propelled one that was either engaged all the time or off depending on the position of a locking lever you would push. To release it, you had to let go of the safety bar that kills the engine which then killed the engine. Not the best of designs. Also, the front wheels being propelled and not the back ones meant that the wheels with the least amount of weight bearing down on them had to pull the weight of the mower around. This was especially noticeable when the grass catcher bag was full. With this arrangement you end up with wheels digging into the grass/dirt and not really pulling the mower well. A side effect of that over the years; the drive wheels also wear down to a point where there’s no tread and in fact, holes where the nice tread used to be. The old mower did have a bagging attachment but the springs that hold the door down when in mulch mode wore out, so the wind created by the blade would blow grass clippings out all over the operator. A bucket and bungee cord fixed that issue.

Lastly and probably most importantly, the old mower was hard to start. It took the strength of a grown man to get the motor spinning fast enough that the spark would actually ignite the gas and the thing would run. To be quite honest, it never was really all that easy to start and keep running. But that’s one of those things you don’t figure out until you get the thing home and un-packed out of the box. I know, there’s the return policy from the store you buy it from, but that’s never as easy as advertised either. So, I messed around with it and tweaked here and there for 15 years.

This spring, I did my research on-line as well as in the store, comparing all the models available. I must say that there’s no shortage of features and accessories that the lawn mower design guys have cooked up. You can get electric start, self-propelled, 2 wheel drive, all-wheel drive, mulch, bag, side discharge, one blade, two blades, blade stop, electric, gas. You name it. You could get anything from an old-fashioned “reel” mower all the way up to a unit priced more than $1,000.00 USD for a residential quality, walk-behind mower.

I ended up deciding on the features and accessories that were important to me and selecting a middle of the road model that did have the all-wheel drive feature that would kick in and out depending on the position of the handle that the operator pushes on to get it to move. So, it matches the pace of the operator which is very cool and the wheels don’t spin all the time so you don’t tear up your turf or wear down the drive wheels. The unit started on the first pull each time and runs strong even through the thick, spring-time grass we have at the moment. I’ve used it twice now and am very happy I opted for a few of the features that I thought would really take away a lot of the pain in dealing with the “tool” to get the results I wanted with my “application” – cutting my grass.

At the end of this story, what does my lawn mower buying experience have to do with EXAIR and compressed air products?  The point is this, when you are looking at a Vortex Tube, an Air Knife or perhaps a Line Vac, remember, that we provide all of these items with all the possible accessories that one might need in an application to make for easy and convenient installation. Perhaps it is as simple as installing a suitable filter/separator that we recommend which keeps the air clean and dry or a regulator to give you finite control over blowing force from a Super Air Knife. Maybe you would even opt to install an Electronic Flow Controller in line with your Super Air Nozzle array so that it only operates when a target to be blown off is actually present.

EXAIR products are great at helping our customers manage their compressed air based applications. The accessories are also an invaluable set of tools to make the installation and use of our products a real pleasure. Back that up with our 30 day guarantee and a great group of Application Engineers to answer all your questions about the product and you begin to understand the kind of company that EXAIR strives to be.

Neal Raker, International Sales Manager
nealraker@exair.com

 

Lawnmower image courtesy of jeffcovey.  Creative commons license.

Bottling Line Can Run Efficiently by Taking a Few Simple Steps

I recently visited a local customer who bottles a liquid drink.  They do two different sizes, single serve and gallon bottles.  The main issues they were having is the gallon bottles were not dry enough after they come out of a cooling / rinse tunnel.  They currently had three different blow off devices in place outside of this cooling tunnel.  The cooling tunnel had hundreds of spray nozzles to both rinse and cool the gallons of liquid.

On the exit of the tunnel there was a blower driven air knife that was being powered by a high maintenance motor that was also sucking in non filtered air to blow the moisture off thee gallon jugs.  The blower was not producing high velocity air and the knife position could not be adjusted for maximum effectiveness due to the hard piping from the blower.

The bottles come out of the blower and go from a 60″ wide conveyor to a 24″ wide conveyor in about five feet of travel. The bottles are then funneled down even further into a single file line and then sped up and sent through two 90 degree bends to try and knock any residual water off them before going into the casing machine.

There were no other blow offs on the gallon line because they were concerned with their compressed air use.  The other two blow offs they had in place were on the single serve bottling line. On that line there were two points that had six separate clusters of a metal flat nozzle that was approximately 1″ wide and were all pointed at a different point of the cap to try and eliminate some moisture that would get trapped under the lip.

The single serve bottles would come out spaced approximately six inches apart but the nozzles were blowing continuously.  This was a very large waste of compressed air.  They could have very easily installed an EXAIR EFC on these supply lines to cut their usage by more than 50% of their current demand.   They then went past an open pipe blow off to help dry the final labeling point.   This was also on continuously which was another opportunity for air savings.

I recommended installing two Electronic Flow Control (EFC) units and replacing their existing nozzles and open pipe with the EXAIR model 1126 1″ Flat Super Air Nozzle outfitted with swivels to allow them to be positioned properly to reach under the bottle cap. Proper positioning, in many cases, increases the effectiveness of the nozzles and can get the job done with fewer nozzles installed. In this application I am confident we can get that bottle cap area blown off with only 2 nozzles.

By eliminating excessive nozzles and cycling compressed air on and off only as needed, the customer saves compressed air. I estimated it was enough compressed air to install a 24″ Deluxe Super Air Knife Kit to blow down on top of the gallon containers, which is the primary reason they asked me to visit in the first place. This will not only give them the 24″ Super Air Knife, but it will also include the crucial EFC and a filter separator to clean the compressed air and a pressure regulator to adjust the pressure down to the minimum necessary for success. All of these factors contribute to optimizing compressed air and using it effectively within anyone’s plant:

  • Eliminate open pipes and ineffective blow offs
  • Turn off compressed air whenever possible
  • Keep it clean to reduce wear and maintenance
  • Adjust the pressure to a minimum level for success

This is just one location in the entire facility where implementing the Electronic Flow Control and EXAIR engineered nozzles will help the customer to optimize their compressed air use.

If you would like to learn more or have questions on any of the EXAIR products mentioned in this blog, feel free to contact us.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

On the lighter side

Well, it’s almost everyone’s favorite time of the year, swimsuit season!!!. I said ALMOST everyone. Which means that crash diets and “lighter” fare choices are in full swing. (I know I need to be incorporating these myself).

Sticking with this theme, I thought I would write this week’s blog on our Light Duty Line Vac. These units provide an alternative solution for conveying smaller volumes of material over a short distance.

Available in eight common sizes, ¾” up to 6”, in aluminum construction, these units use less compressed air than our other Line Vac products. The Light Duty Line Vac also has no moving parts and requires no electricity to operate, making them virtually maintenance free!

Light Duty Line VacAir consumption is minimal, ranging from our smallest unit consuming 7.30 SCFM @ 80 PSI, up to our largest unit consuming 80.20 SCFM @ 80 PSI.  You can also control the conveying rate by regulating your compressed air supply pressure.

For even more control, you could add one of our Electronic Flow Control (EFC) which uses timing control and a photoelectric sensor to turn off your compressed air when there is no media/part present.

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To see our complete line of Air Operated Conveyors, visit our website www.EXAIR.com or if you need assistance with an application, please do not hesitate to contact an application engineer at 1-800-903-9247.

 

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
JustinNicholl@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_JN