Multiple Choice

My oldest son got his driver’s license last week.  There was a popular commercial for an insurance company, a while back, that touted how “life comes at you fast,” and that’s been the story of my week:

Friday: Son passes driver’s exam, first time, 100%. Proud Dad moment.
Saturday: Dad & Son go used car shopping. Pride has a price tag.
Sunday: Dad & Son bond while detailing new (to us) car. Son learns what to do when engine in 10 year old car stalls while backing out of driveway cold. Pride usually is followed by lesson in humility.
Monday: Mom adds Son to auto insurance policy. Insurance agent no longer concerned about funding retirement. Pride is getting expensive.
Monday part 2: Son learns valuable lesson about leaving lights on when parking at school in pre-dawn hours. Dad’s portable jumpstarter finds new home in trunk of Son’s car. Lessons in humility have caused pride to approach pre-licensing levels.
Tuesday-present: Enjoying what we can of a return to incident-free normalcy (and I hope I didn’t just jinx it by putting that in writing.)

We had quite a few choices, looking at cars in our (limited) budget range. Having these choices allowed us to choose the features that most appealed to us. They were pretty much all small-to-mid-size used cars with automatic transmissions and fuel efficient (read: small) engines. The one we settled on was the same model (and a year newer) as one I’d owned previously. It was one that had proved reliable, and safe…I was in an accident in that one where the air bag deployed, and I walked away with no injuries. Safety is a big selling point for me, especially where my family is involved.

When we speak with customers at EXAIR, many times, we too, can offer multiple choices to provide a solution.

I had the pleasure of helping a caller with a chip removal application recently. The application was to solve a problem with stringy chips wrapping around a plastic cylindrical part as it was turned on a lathe. The initial thought was to use a Super Air Nozzle to blow them away. Our Model 1100 1/4 NPT Zinc Aluminum Super Air Nozzle was discussed…inexpensive, low air consumption, easy to mount (we also talked about Stay Set Hoses and Magnetic Bases,) and super quiet.

EXAIR Model 1100 Super Air Nozzle is commonly used in point-of-cutting debris removal applications.

EXAIR Model 1100 Super Air Nozzle is commonly used in point-of-cutting debris removal applications.

The second thought was to use a small Line Vac to convey the debris away. Small footprint, easy to install, collection of waste in a receptacle away from the machine, still easy on air use & noise level.

Model 6080 3/4" Line Vac is also used in point-of-machining applications, removing debris from the site altogether.

Model 6080 3/4″ Line Vac is also used in point-of-machining applications, removing debris from the site altogether.

The third option came up when discussing tool life. Turns out, one of their machinists was familiar with our Cold Guns, and how they had been used to markedly improve tool life while eliminating the need for coolant at a previous job. This turned out to be all it took for them to try the Model 5215 Cold Gun Aircoolant System.

EXAIR's Cold Guns not only blow debris away, but also provide cooling for tool life improvement.

EXAIR’s Cold Guns not only blow debris away, but also provide cooling for tool life improvement.  With (4) Models to choose from, we’ve got the right one for your needs.

Any of the three options – Super Air Nozzle, Line Vac, or Cold Gun – should have solved this application successfully, with different benefits. They simply chose the one with the benefits that appealed to them the most.

If you have an application regarding compressed air product use that you’d like to discuss, give me a call. We’ll cover all the bases, and get the one that works best for you.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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