Efficient Energy

As we welcome the return of Ivan Banks from a lengthy trip overseas, I’m reminded of the wide cultural variety over which we supply our products.  Reading through the travel brochures and noting the different customs proves to be a stark reminder of how isolated it can be to live within your comfort zone.

There’s a quote by Robert Louis Stevenson that says, “There are no foreign lands.  It is the traveler only who is foreign.”  Reading through expected differences on the CIBT website has shown me that this is indeed the case.  I like to relate this to a method of thinking as well.

We’re often taught how to do something and it can be strange to see things done in a different way.  In industry, however, we’re always looking for a more economical and efficient process to achieve the end goals.  It’s a frequent occurrence to see something pieced together in an ingenious way, or in a much different manner than would be expected.

Fortunately, along with the worldwide appreciation for ingenuity, there is also an appreciation for efficiency.  This has helped EXAIR to be transparent across multiple cultures and markets.  Our efficiency lab is a prime example of our efficiency appreciation, as well as a variety of posts by our very own, Professor Penurious.

Earlier this week I ran a calculation for an application currently using a 20 horsepower blower system to clean steel tanks.  The system was inefficient, and the results were poor.  The application needed a blow off with higher force and a more efficient use of the plant energy.  We were able to propose multiple setups of EXAIR Super Air Nozzles or Super Air Knives to accomplish the necessary blow off.  And, the operational cost of any EXAIR system was almost half that of the blower system.  (Approximately $2500.00/yr. to operate the blower system vs. approximately $1400.00/yr. to operate the EXAIR blow off components)  In addition to lower operating cost, the EXAIR products had a lower purchase price as well.  Just another prime example of the benefits to an EXAIR equipped blow off system.

We run calculations like this with great frequency.  And we do this for applications all over the world.  Efficiency and cost savings are a language everyone seems to speak.

The following calculations show electrical cost for operating a 20 Hp blower and do not include any maintenance costs associated with blower maintenance such as bearing replacement. The cost for generating compressed air ($0.25/1000 cubic feet) includes electrical costs and maintenance costs.

20 HP Blower  = 14.71 kW
14.71 kW x 0.083 = Operational cost per hour
14.71 kW x 0.083 = $1.22 per hour
1.22 cents per hour x 40 hours per week =$48.80
$48.80 per week x 52 weeks per year = $2537.60
Annual operating cost = $2537.60   

EXAIR Blow off (55 SCFM)
55 SCFM x 60 minutes = 3300 SCF/hour
3300 SCF x 40 = 132000 cubic feet per week
132000 x 52 = 6,864,000 cubic feet per year
6,864,000/1000 = 6864     6864 x $0.25 = $1716.00
Annual Operating cost = $1716.00

Operating costs based on electricity cost of 8.3 cents per kWh.  Annual cost reflects 40 hours per work week, 52 weeks per year.

(For those interested, the photo is of a concept to allow charging of a cell phone battery by swinging the battery around your finger.  Designed by Song Teaho & Hyejin Lee)

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
leeevans@exair.com
@EXAIR_LE

The Big E

The USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier commissioned by the US Navy. It is the second oldest Navy vessel in commission…USS Constitution (Old Ironsides) is the oldest. The “Big E” is currently at sea, on her last deployment. She carries around 3,000 sailors, 250 pilots, and 1,500 “Airdales,”, 70 or so aircraft, 8 nuclear reactors, and, among other things, one EXAIR Ultrasonic Leak Detector.

Before setting sail last month, they took on board a technical advisor for their complement of EA-6B Prowler aircraft. He’s helping the “Airdales” find better and more efficient ways to maintain the planes, and before he left, I had the pleasure of helping him purchase our Model 9061 Ultrasonic Leak Detector, to try it out on our 30-Day Unconditional Guarantee. Before they even got underway, though, he used it to pinpoint a leak which would have taken them many hours to locate, in a complicated system.

He said that other squadrons’ personnel are actually hoping for a leak, so they can see the ULD in action. Word has even spread to another land-based squadron, and they want to see it as soon as he gets back. I think he’s keeping it.

I wrote up another non-compressed-air application for the ULD a while back. This is just another example of how handy a device this thing really is. If you want to:

*Locate a leak in an air, steam, non-flammable gas, refrigeration or A/C system, or even brake systems, tubes, tires, or radiators
*Find the source of bearing and gear wear
*Locate arcing in an electrical system
*Check for cracks in a V-Belt, or the condition of an engine seal
*Keep your multi-million dollar fighter aircraft in good working order,

Then EXAIR’s Ultrasonic Leak Detector is what you’re looking for. Fair winds and following seas to the crew, officers, and personnel of USS Enterprise. Thank you for your service.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: http://www.exair.com
Blog: https://blog.exair.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

OSHA is Concerned About Noise, You Should Be Too

For a guy who is exceptionally sensitive to noise I often wonder why I thought having three kids was a good idea. Don’t get me wrong here, like every other guy in the world, I enjoy the built-in excuse to behave like a 10-year-old. But the noise which accompanies three children, and their friends, may one day be part of the equation for an army’s non-lethal defense system.

For example, a flute playing daughter, a trumpet playing son and another with an inclination for bongos or other assorted drums. Nevermind the memorization and vocalization of myriad Weird Al songs mixed with Crazy Train or Iron Man. Did I mention anything about general screaming, wrestling grunts and assorted crashing sounds I prefer not to find the origin of? How about my luck of moving next door to a child with the most grating voice this side of Fran Drescher?

All in all I prefer the basement door shut, the roar held to a dull one and my Iron Man through a set of mightily insulated headphones (oddly enough music is almost impossible to be too loud). There is something about the sharpness or frequency of constant kid noises that does take its toll.

But all of this noise is, in fact, the result of my choices and I wouldn’t change a thing (though it may be hard to glean that from the above rant). If it weren’t for those kids I would never recognize peace and quiet on the rare occasion it reveals itself. Nor would I be able to tell the difference between the “I’m really hurt” and “I’m faking death” distress calls.

Fortunately I am afforded a job where I can turn my attention to other damaging noises to concentrate upon. The noise of compressed air. Were you aware that OSHA mandates limited exposure noise levels within the workplace and that constant exposure to high decibel levels of noise can damage your ears? OSHA currently recommends hearing protection for any decibel level above 90 dBA. Many work areas exceed this level and should not be entered without hearing protection. But humans being, well, human – we cannot always rely on folks making good decisions when entering such areas.

Some of these loud areas can have the environmental noise levels lowered by reducing the noise levels of compressed air use. Open air lines are notorious for producing decibel levels beyond the safe range. EXAIR recommends outfitting open lines with our engineered Super Air Nozzles, the quietest air nozzles in industry. Other products, Super Air Amplifiers and Super Air Knives will also dramatically lower air noise in the area. Pneumatic Cylinders also get loud when exhausting air and need to be outfitted with mufflers to protect your people from harmful noise levels.

Noise is a dangerous element of many work areas. So dangerous, in fact, OSHA presents exposure guidelines to protect us from it. EXAIR can help you lower noise levels and assist you in providing a better work environment for those hard-working folks who have to deal with it on a daily basis.

Let us know if you would like any additional information. For now, I’m going to see if OSHA has any standards for exposure to loud children…

Kirk Edwards
Application Engineer
kirkedwards@exair.com

Go OSHA Safe & Save Money in the Process

Another customer has contacted EXAIR and taken advantage of our FREE Efficiency Lab.  This customer has approximately 150 homemade magnetic blow offs throughout their facility.  They are being used to help move and push paper down the lines.

This unit was taken into the lab and put through the paces. The first being flow; The drilled hole in the pipe plug measured out to be a .061″ diameter hole.  The customers operating pressure for these units is 50 PSIG, so all testing was performed at 50 PSI at the unit.  The unit was flowing 3.46 SCFM per nozzle.   We then tested the sound level, at a distance of 3′ the unit measured 77.5 dBA, then force measured  3.2 oz at 12″ away from the homemade blow off.

Because the homemade blow off was a 1/8″ MNPT pipe plug it’s extremely easy to replace the unit with one of our Atto Super Air Nozzles.  The Atto Super Air Nozzle is a good fit for this application, even with a slightly lower force value, since we have determined the application can be successful at lower force values. The Atto Super Air Nozzle will also produce OSHA compliance for this blow off process. For this application the Atto Super Air Nozzle was tested at 50 PSIG inlet pressure and consumed 1.89 SCFM, created a 63.5 dBA noise level, along with gave 1.6 oz. of force 12″ away.

This calculates to saving 1.57 SCFM per nozzle, reducing the ambient noise level by 14 dBA, and still being able to get the job done.  When you calculate the savings for all 150 nozzles being operated at once the customer will save $3.53 per hour of operation.  Considering these nozzles run whenever  product is present that means the customer will save $28.26 per 8 hour day.

On top of the cost savings the customer gains the safety of the Atto Super Air Nozzle.  Their original blowoff device does not meet or exceed the OSHA standard for 30 PSI dead-end pressure.  Because the piece has a single hole the risk of an air embolism is there.  With the EXAIR Pico Super Air Nozzle we meet or exceed the OSHA standard for dead-end pressure to help keep the operators safe and in a quieter environment.

If you would like to take advantage of the EXAIR Efficiency Lab feel free to fill out the form and then send in your sample.  We’ll get it tested and give you a full report on how we can help.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Batting Practice

The First Day of Spring yesterday ushered in the first “real” practice for my son’s baseball team. The coach’s teenage son (and built-in assistant coach) participated in a baseball workshop over the winter, where they studied Albert Pujols’ batting technique, and developed a regimen around it. They broke it up in a series of exercises, targeting the motions of the individual body parts, that, when combined, will produce in these boys the slugging prowess of the future Hall of Famer. But, when they’re running through the motions individually, it’s very entertaining to watch…when they’re all lined up next to the coach’s son doing them, it looks like a Broadway dance routine…and 12-year old boys HATE to dance. They also hate it when their dads laugh at them for dancing.

Time will tell if all of this pays off…the coach himself is going out on a limb here, deviating from typical Knothole hitting practices that go back to at least the 1970’s, when I was a struggling young ball player. To be honest, my best bet for getting on base was to lean in and take a pitch to the ribs (that area of my body was larger than most kids’ anyway). Regardless of the outcome, though, nothing beats watching a good Knothole baseball game, so I’m really looking forward to the next few months.

I hope it works, but I suppose if he sees it not working at all, the coach can still go back to the tried & true “basics” come mid-season. It’s always nice to have options when your best laid plans don’t quite hit the mark in the real world. At EXAIR, that’s where our 30-Day Unconditional Guarantee comes in to play. As much as we can learn about your application, it may come down to a decision to try something out and see if “looks good on paper” can get to “mission accomplished.”

I can’t wait to see these guys start slugging home runs off of unsuspecting pitchers here in a few weeks. One way or the other.  It’s been a long winter…play ball!

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: http://www.exair.com
Blog: https://blog.exair.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Basketball Madness

Basketball is dominating conversations around the water cooler, TV programming is being preempted by playoffs, and office pools are circulating around. Lest we forget, we still have work to do.

For the month of a March EXAIR is offering some promotions to help you get that work done. Featured this month are our industrial vacuums; Reversible Drum Vac , Chip Trapper, Chip Vac, and Heavy Duty Dry Vac. With the purchase of any of these products you will receive a free Vac U Gun which is a popular hand held vacuum.

Also since we are not out of the static electricity season yet, the promotion on static eliminators has been extended to March 31.  With the purchase of a static eliminator you will receive a free AC sensor.

In addition to the promos, EXAIR has published a new catalog featuring a host of new products that will help you more effectively and efficiently use compressed air.

If you need more than the data offered in the catalog, EXAIR has a staff of engineers that will answer all your technical questions. None of whom are currently leading our office basketball pool. Just let ’em help you with compressed air stuff, I wouldn’t trust them with picking your brackets.

Joe Panfalone
Application Engineer

Phone (513) 671-3322
Fax   (513) 671-3363
Web: http://www.exair.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/exair_jp
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

Pies Are Round…Cakes Are Square!

So, it’s Pi Day…you math aficionados (read: geeks, and yes, I include myself among you) know what I’m talking about. For everyone else, today is March 14th, or 3/14, or 3.14, which is the mathematical constant that is the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. Pi is commonly rounded off to nearest hundredth, although, as an irrational number, its decimal representation never ends, and never repeats. Over the centuries, computing Pi to a higher number of digits has been the fascination and passion of the prominent mathematicians of the day. In the 16th Century, Ludolph van Ceulen devoted the greater part of his life to calculating Pi to 35 decimal digits. He was so proud of his accomplishment that he had the digits engraved on his tombstone.

In the 21st Century, mathematicians have used computer programs to calculate Pi to mind-boggling accuracy: the current record stands at 5 trillion decimal digits. I’m not sure of who needs it to be that accurate, or what they’d use it for, but it reminded me of a funny story I heard from a friend’s father.

My friend Bill’s dad worked as an engineer for an aircraft engine manufacturer, and was involved with the first computer aided drafting program that they implemented. A fabricator came to him one day, and asked him how accurately he could plot the dimensions for an irregularly-shaped piece they needed to make out of sheet metal. He said he could easily get it to 0.001” accuracy, so he and the fabricator worked together to produce the drawing. When it came time to cut out the part, the fabricator proudly escorted my friend’s dad down to the shop floor, where he saw his drawing – with dimensions reported to the nearest thousandth of an inch – next to the piece of sheet metal, which they had laid out the dimensions on…using a tape measure and chalk. Then, they cut the part out. By hand. With an acetylene torch.

Perhaps since Pi Day is near the beginning of springtime in North America, the Application Engineers at EXAIR could also proclaim it the Official Start Date of Cabinet Cooler Season. If you have an electrical enclosure that requires cooling, we can help. If it’s existing equipment, we just need a few key dimensions and temperatures. If it’s a new application, we can work with any data you can provide. We won’t be calculating to the thousandth of anything, but we’ll get you the appropriately sized system for your enclosure.  To do this, we’ll be using algebra and geometry, but, unfortunately, no ∏.  Nor will we be applying trigonometry, but here’s a little something that I’m sure that true participants in Pi Day celebrations will appreciate:

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
(513)671-3322 local
(800)923-9247 toll free
(513)671-3363 fax
Web: http://www.exair.com
Blog: https://blog.exair.com/
Twitter: twitter.com/exair_rb
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/exair

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