Coast to Coast and Beyond

Recently, I was working with  a customer looking for a Premium Reversible Drum Vac and wanted it shipped to the Northwest Territories of Canada –  which we could do!  It got me to thinking, what are the farthest US state and territory locations EXAIR has shipped to in the North, South, West and East directions.  I ‘scoured’ the records and came up with these.

Furthest North- We have shipped to Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.  Most recently, believe it or not, we shipped a NEMA 4X Cabinet Cooler to an Oil and Natural Gas Exploration Company.  Goes to show that even the coldest environments still have the need to provide cool, clean, dry air to cool and protect electronics in electrical enclosures.

Furthest South – We have shipped to the US Territory of Puerto Rico, city of Santa Isabel.  An Aerospace company needed a strong, laminar blast of air and utilized a 6″ Stainless Steel Air Knife.  An Air Knife offers a quiet, efficient way to clean, dry or cool parts, webs, or conveyors.

Furthest West- We have shipped to the US Territory of Guam.  The local University ordered a model 1111-4 Super Air Nozzle Cluster, for a good strong blast of air flow for a cleaning operation.  The model 1111-4 delivers 3.2 lbs of force, at just 82 dBA of sound. A safe and efficient nozzle for blowoff operations.

Furthest East- We have shipped to Eastport, Maine.  The customer in Eastport ordered a Line Vac and a section of Conveyance Hose.  The Line Vac is a great tool for conveying large volumes of material over long distances, through a standard hose or tube.  The compact design features large throat diameters for maximum throughput capability.

 

It was interesting to look back and see all the places that EXAIR has shipped.  We have customers from all over the globe. If you are outside the of 50 US States and Canada, we have a dedicated team of International Application Engineers that will work with you to select the best EXAIR product for your process and application, and direct you to your local International Distributor.

If you would like to talk about any of the EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air® Products, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or one of our Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

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Twitter: @EXAIR_BB

Another Unique Solution in an Aluminum Processing Plant

Fine dust particles needed to be removed from this belt on the underside of a conveyor

A few months back I wrote about the impact of installing Super Air Knives in an aluminum processing plant.  Those Super Air Knives solved a recurring problem with cleaning alumina dust around conveyors and reduced costs for the end user by over $80k.

That same customer has also found a method to remove fine dust from the underside of the conveyor belt in an application area not suitable for an Air Knife.  In this application there was no dust collection system in place to carry away the fines as they are blown off of the belt, so a different type of solution was needed.

Model 150200 Heavy Duty Line Vac provides the vacuum needed to remove the dust fines.

That solution was to install a Heavy Duty Line Vac affixed to a vacuum hood to remove fines from the belt and convey them back to the head chute.  The only problem with this setup was that the 2” Heavy Duty Line Vac produced a bit too much vacuum flow than what was really needed in the application.  So, a pressure regulator was installed to allow for adjustment and fine tuning of the vacuum solution.  The customer was able to adjust the operating conditions for the Line Vac and minimize compressed air use while maximizing the vacuuming effect on the fines stuck to the conveyor.

The Line Vac used in this application quickly and easily solved a chronic problem plaguing this manufacturer.  By installing this vacuum solution they were able to prevent build-up of dust and debris underneath the conveyor which originally required shutting down the line to clean.  This improved process uptime, reduced cleaning costs, and increased throughput in the application.

If you have an application in need of a vacuum solution, consider an EXAIR Line Vac.  And, if you have any questions, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.  We’ll be happy to help.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

Slick Application for a Super Air Knife

A few weeks back I worked with a customer on an unusual application for one of our Air Knives. The company runs a camp, located in the North-Central part of the United States, complete with their own ski hill for skiing, snowboarding or tubing. They use a conveyor belt ski lift where the skier or snowboarder will stand on the belt and be transported back to the top of the hill for another run. They were starting to see some safety issues arise when the mat would get wet and freeze, causing the skiers to slip and fall back.

Photo of the ski belt conveyor

In an effort to remedy the situation, the installed a brush to try and help remove some of the snow and ice from the belt and while this helped a little, there was still moisture on the belt that would re-freeze. To aid in the drying process, they tried to use a floor blower aimed at the belt but the turbulent airflow seemed to “push” the water around rather than wipe it clean and dry. Out of ideas, they found EXAIR while doing an internet search and decided to give us call for assistance.

Further reviewing the details of the application, I recommended our 30″ Stainless Steel Super Air Knife for the application. The Super Air Knife provides an high velocity, laminar sheet of air across the length of the knife. The laminar flow from the air knife, would assure an even drying effect across the belt, rather than the turbulent flow from the blower. The stainless steel construction of the knife would hold up to the potentially harsh environmental conditions as well.

Super Air Knife available in aluminum, 303ss, or 316ss construction in lengths from 3″ up to 108″.

After some correspondence back and forth regarding air requirements and installation recommendations, the customer was able to source a rental compressor and ordered the 30″ Super Air Knife to test under our Unconditional 30 Day Guarantee. After a few weeks of testing, they were able to effectively dry the belt to an acceptable level, increasing the overall safety for their guests.

30″ SS Super Air Knife mounted under the belt on the “return” side.

 

Clever installation allowed for easy angle adjustment to ensure the airflow contacted the belt for optimal blowoff/drying.

EXAIR offers the quietest (69 dBA at 80 PSIG) and longest (up to 108″) Air Knives on the market today and we stock them in the most materials (aluminum, 303SS, 316Ss and PVDF) to best suit your application. To see how you might be able to utilize an Air Knife in your unique application, give us a call at 800-903-9247.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

 

 

 

 

How Do You Make Cement? Start with Clinkers

Last week I wrote about the use of the Atomizing Nozzles to create a fog for wet room curing of concrete samples poured during road construction.  This week, I had the opportunity to work with another customer about concrete, but this time it was regarding the the manufacturing process.  Invariably, I always learn something new , and for this interaction, it was the term ‘clinkers.’

Concrete is a composite material composed of coarse aggregate bonded together with a fluid cement that hardens over time.  The customer I was working with was a cement manufacturer.  Cement production is basically a 2 step process – 1) clinker is produced from raw materials and 2) cement is produced from cement clinker.

clinkers
Typical Cement Clinkers

To make the clinker (step one), several powder raw materials are fed into a rotary kiln.  The kiln is heated to very high temperatures, and when the materials are mixed and heated, new compounds are formed and hydraulic hardening occurs resulting in the formation of the clinker.

My customer needed a way to clean off the residual dust left on the transport belts, after the clinkers were transported to storage silos.  Due to the high temperatures in the area, we focused in on the EXAIR Type 303 Stainless Steel model of the Super Air Knife, as it can withstand temperatures up to 800°F.  The customer went with (3) of the Super Air Knife Kits, which include the Shim Set, Auto Drain Filter Separator, and Pressure Regulator w/ Gauge, for easiest installation with maximum functionality.

The Super Air Knife is a tried and true product for cleaning, drying, cooling and general blowoff for conveyors.  And with widths up to 108″ available, any size conveyor can be handled.

To make cement (step two), the clinker is ground into fine powder with other ingredients including gypsum (calcium sulphates) and possibly additional cementitious (such as blastfurnace slag, coal fly ash, natural pozzolanas, etc.) or inert materials (limestone). It is then stored or packaged and ready to be made into concrete.

To discuss your application and how an EXAIR Super Air Knife can benefit your process, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or one of our other Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

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Twitter: @EXAIR_BB

Super Air Knife Helps Keep a Belt Clean for a Cement Factory

A cement factory was having some issues with spillage of cement powder underneath his conveyor. This 48” wide conveyor system used a cleated belt to carry the cement ingredients up an incline to a mixing chamber.  As the conveyor went around the end to dump the mix, some of it would stick to the cleats and corners where the cleats were attached to the belt.  At the conveyor return, any ingredients that were sticking to the belt would dislodge and fall to the ground.  Spillage is wasteful, costly, unsafe, and time consuming to cleanup.  He wondered if I could help him with his application.

I recommended the model 110248PKI Super Air Knife.  This model included a 48” (122cm) Super Air Knife, a filter, a regulator, a shim set, and a plumbing kit.  The filter would capture any excess water and contamination from the compressed air line that you would not want on the belt or in the cement mix.  The regulator and shim set would be used to control the amount of force required to remove the cement mix without creating a dust cloud.  The plumbing kit provides all of the necessary fittings and hose to prevent pressure drops and keep our customers from hunting down all the right fittings.

PKI

The Super Air Knife would be placed underneath the conveyor on the return side after the mix was dumped. It should be mounted about 6” (15 cm) away from the belt and at a 45 degree angle blowing back toward the end of the conveyor.  The force of the air would dislodge any excess mix and push it back to the opening of the mixer. As a result, the cement mix was not being wasted on the ground or creating a dust nuisance, but being used to make cement.

If you have excess waste and believe that we can help, you can contact an Application Engineer at EXAIR at 1-800-903-9247.

John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb