EXAIR Leads the Way with Standards and Certifications

For over 34 years, EXAIR has been the industry leader in providing Intelligent Compressed Air Products to the industrial marketplace. While much of our focus is to ensure our products are engineered to provide optimal performance, we are also dedicated to manufacturing products that meet a wide range of standards and directives to promote safety in relation to plant personnel.

 

For instance, all of our compressed air operated products meet or exceed OSHA Standards 29 CFR 1910.242(b), requiring that the outlet pressure of an open pipe, nozzle, air gun, etc., when used for cleaning purposes, must remain below 30 PSI when dead-ended against the skin, as well as Standard 29 CFR 1910.95(a) as a way to protect workers from job related injuries related to dangerous sound levels of 90 dBA and higher.

 

 


Many of our products are also CE Compliant, meeting the mandatory requirements for products intended to be sold in the European Economic Area or “EEA”. For example our Electronic Flow Control and Electronic Temperature Control (ETC) meet the EU (European Union) Low Voltage Directive 2006/95/EC.

 

 

EXAIR electrically powered devices, like our Static Eliminators and Digital Flowmeters for example, comply with the “Restriction of Hazardous Substances” or RoHS Directive 2011/65/EU, including the amendment outlined in the European Commission decision L 214/65.

 

 

We are also committed to providing material that supports the conflict mineral free rule to help aid in the relief of illegal trade of exotic materials, like tungsten, gold, tin and tantalum in the DRC region. Using the CMRT 4.20 template, we document our supply resources to ensure we provide conflict free products, as outlined in Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

 

Lastly, the European Union introduced the REACH program – Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals, as a method to register chemical substances being imported into the EU to protect people and the environment, per Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 Title I, Article 3.  Also noted in the program, Title II, Article 7, they state that any product with a substance intended to be released under normal operating conditions, must be registered for quantities totaling more than 1 metric ton per year. Since EXAIR products do not intentionally release or contain any such substances, registration to meet the program is not required.

 

If you have any questions about any of these Standards or Directives or about which EXAIR products comply, please feel free to contact an application engineer for assistance. We’d be happy to help!

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

Many Ways to $ave on Compressed Air Costs

Using compressed air in the plant is common for many types of processes.  Typical uses are drying, cooling, cleaning and conveying. Compressed air does have a cost to consider, and there are many ways to keep the usage and the costs as low as possible.  The first step is to use an EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Product, which has been engineered to provide the most performance while using the least amount of compressed air. The next step is to control the use of the air, to only have it on when needed.

EXAIR offers the EFC – Electronic Flow Control.  It offers the most comprehensive method to maximize the efficiency of compressed air usage.  It combines a photoelectric sensor with a timing control that operates a solenoid valve to turn on and off the air as required. With 8 different program types, an on/off mode that works with any process can be programmed ensuring that the minimum amount of compressed air is used.  You can use the online EFC Savings Calculator to see how quickly the savings add up!

EFCp4
EFC – Electronic Flow Control

Another method would be to use a solenoid valve with some other method of control. Depending on the process, the solenoid could be energized via a machine control output, or as simple as an electrical push button station. EXAIR offers solenoid valves in a variety of flow rates (from 40 to 350 SCFM) and voltages (24 VDC, 120 VAC and 240 VAC) to match the air flow requirements of the products we provide, while integrating into the facility and available supply voltages.

For control of the Cabinet Cooler Systems, the ETC – Electronic Temperature Control, uses a thermocouple to measure cabinet temperature and cycle the system on and off to maintain a precise cabinet temperature, and provides a digital readout of the internal temperatures and on the fly adjustment.  Also available is the Thermostat Control models, which utilize an adjustable bimetallic thermostat to control the solenoid valve, also cycling the unit on and off as needed to maintain a set cabinet temperature.

ETC CC
ETC – Electronic Temperature Control

There are several manual methods that can be used to control the compressed air.  A simple valve can be used to turn the air off when not needed, whether at the end of the work day, at break time, or whenever the air isn’t required.  We offer several options, from a foot controlled valve, to a magnetic base with on/off valve, to a simple quarter turn ball valve.

footpedalvalve (2)dualstand (2) manual_valves (2)

 

To discuss your processes and how an EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Product can control the air supply and save you money, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or one of our other Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

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Twitter: @EXAIR_BB

 

 

There’s More Than 1 Way To Blow Some Air

Just today I spoke with a customer who is threading the ends of pipes and needs to blow the coolant and chips out of the threads.   The pipes range from 4″ to 9 – 5/8″ Diameters.  They are all threaded then fed into a trough and pushed down line to the next operation.

PEO ACWA
A machine with an out-feed roller conveyor similar to the pipe threading machine mentioned.

The photo above is not the exact machine but you can see where if this was used to process piping the different diameter pipes would all sit at the same level.  One option could be to use a Super Air Wipe  for this application but then the smaller diameters would not pass through the center of the Air Wipe, instead they would pass through the bottom half of the airflow which may not give optimal performance. Instead, I suggested to use 4 of our 6″ Super Air Knife kits and 2 of our Electronic Flow Control units.

 

2 - 110006 - 6" Aluminum Super Air Knives coupled together w/  a 110900 SAK Connector Kit
2 – 110006 – 6″ Aluminum Super Air Knives coupled together w/ a 110900 SAK Connector Kit

I  suggested that we make two pairs of knives for this blowoff setup by coupling two of the 6″ Super Air Knives together.  Once they are coupled together like is shown above, we could mount the two coupled air knives vertically along the trough and blowing at a 45° angle toward the center of the conveyor.  The plumbing of the two bottom knives will be to one EFC while the top two knives will be plumbed to the other.    The sensors will then be set up at two different heights, lower knives to sense the bottom of the pipe and the upper knife sensor will be set just above the bottom 6″ knife.

The reason for using 4 – 6″ Super Air Knives and 2 EFCs instead of 2 – 12″ Super Air Knives and 1 EFC is to save the most compressed air possible.   By enabling them to turn the top two 6″ Super Air Knives off automatically when they are running below a 6″ diameter pipe.  Then when a larger pipe is processed the top knives will also kick on with the lower knives and provide a uniform blowoff of the product.

So if you have multiple sizes of product being processed on the same line and don’t think any one solution will work, contact us and see if we can’t come up with our own recipe.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

 

Machine image courtesy PEO ACWA Creative Commons

 

The 4th Step to Compressed Air Savings

EXAIR’s Electronic Flow Controller (EFC) is a stand alone timing and control product for compressed air. The EFC combines a photo electric sensor, solenoid, and timing control to turn off compressed air, when a part is not present. The timing control comes with 8 different settings for delaying the opening of valve, delaying the closing of the valve, setting an interval, continuously operating or some combination of these settings. This flexibility makes it a great option for someone who is looking to control any compressed air device to conserve compressed air. It is a great option for a company that is implementing the Six Steps to Optimizing your Compressed Air System. The EFC is designed to implement the 4th step – turning compressed air off when it is not in use.

EFCp4

The EFC is certainly valuable when controlling EXAIR’s Long Super Air Knife. Here is an example: An automotive company blows off a 55″ tall body panel. A 60 inch Super Air Knife will use 174 SCFM of compressed air at 80 PSIG of inlet pressure. The body panels come by at a rate of two parts every minute, but each body panel is only in the air stream of the air knife for 20 seconds. This means for 20 seconds of every minute the air knife is running without doing any work. To stop wasting compressed air an EFC can be setup to open the solenoid for 20 seconds after the body panel passes the photoelectric sensor. This will save one third of the 174 SCFM or 58 SCFM. Typical industrial cost of compressed air is $0.25 per 1,000 SCF. This automotive plant runs 24 hours per day. The EFC would save 83,520 SCF of compressed air over 24 hours, which costs the automotive company $20.88. Over 250 working days in a year the EFC will save $5,220. This is huge savings for simple fast installation that can be installed in any intermittent compressed air application.

The EFC is a great solution for controlling your compressed air usage.  The ROI for the EFC can be huge depending on the size of your compressed air usage, but in all cases, it is a key step to developing a efficient compressed air system.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
@EXAIR_DW
DaveWoerner@EXAIR.com

On the lighter side

Well, it’s almost everyone’s favorite time of the year, swimsuit season!!!. I said ALMOST everyone. Which means that crash diets and “lighter” fare choices are in full swing. (I know I need to be incorporating these myself).

Sticking with this theme, I thought I would write this week’s blog on our Light Duty Line Vac. These units provide an alternative solution for conveying smaller volumes of material over a short distance.

Available in eight common sizes, ¾” up to 6”, in aluminum construction, these units use less compressed air than our other Line Vac products. The Light Duty Line Vac also has no moving parts and requires no electricity to operate, making them virtually maintenance free!

Light Duty Line VacAir consumption is minimal, ranging from our smallest unit consuming 7.30 SCFM @ 80 PSI, up to our largest unit consuming 80.20 SCFM @ 80 PSI.  You can also control the conveying rate by regulating your compressed air supply pressure.

For even more control, you could add one of our Electronic Flow Control (EFC) which uses timing control and a photoelectric sensor to turn off your compressed air when there is no media/part present.

Image

To see our complete line of Air Operated Conveyors, visit our website www.EXAIR.com or if you need assistance with an application, please do not hesitate to contact an application engineer at 1-800-903-9247.

 

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
JustinNicholl@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_JN

Who You Gonna Call?

This week the world lost a great writer, actor, and comedian with the death of Harold Ramis. Ramis is famous on screen for playing Dr. Egon Spengler in the movie Ghostbusters. What he wrote surprises me even more. Looking through Ramis’s IMDB page, I find most movies that I loved as a kid or that my dad quoted to me on a regular basis had Ramis’s name as a writer. Just to recap for the uninitiated in the cult of Ramis, his writing credits include Animal House, Meatballs, Caddyshack, Stripes, Ghostbusters, Groundhog Day, and Analyze This. He also directed Caddyshack, National Lampoon’s Vacation, Multipilicity, Bedazzled, and Year One. He also has a severely overlooked scene in Knocked Up as the grandfather to be. Talking to my wife I discovered, that she may or may not have seen the entire Ghostbusters movie, so now we have our big weekend plans.  I tried to get her to watch already, but she seemed distracted. I will just try again this weekend.  I’m thinking a Ramis marathon is in order.  I’m thinking CaddyShack, Ghostbusters, Ghostbuster 2 and Groundhog Day.

ghostbusters

The closest thing to a family rated movie in the list is Ghostbusters, though as I was reminded by my colleagues there are some off color jokes. Maybe it is best to find it on TV, if you are going to watch with the kids. One of my favorite scenes is when the hotel manager, played by Michael Ensign, has to call the Ghostbusters as a last resort. The hotel is a very ritzy joint, where problems like physics, logistics and ghosts should obviously be no problem for the immense amount of money it costs to rent out their grand ballroom. It is not in the movie, but you could imagine the Michael Ensign character has already called an exterminator, a priest, and the police.  None of these people have had any luck removing the green slimy ghost from the hotel. Therefore, on the night of a great party for an important guest, he has to stoop to calling the Ghostbusters.  Hilarity ensues.

After this scene, we are reintroduced to the great Ray Parker Jr.’s great Ghostbusters theme song known in my house as ““Who You Gonna Call?” Well if you have an industrial compressed air problem or general manufacturing question, EXAIR is a great place to start. With over 100 years of industrial experience available and 45 years with the company, the Application Engineers who answer technical questions here at EXAIR should be able to help you. Even if we don’t have the product/process for you, we have a wealth of contacts that provide cooling, blow off, coating, cleaning and painting options to help you solve your problem. Just don’t call us about ghost, we’ve got nothin’. We could help you create a ghost effect for your April Fools joke.  Air Amplifiers and some neon streamers under a black light can scare anyone, but I will use that in some other blog.

Harold R

Bye Mr. Ramis you will be missed!

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
Davewoerner@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_DW

EXAIR’s Electronic Flow Control Saves Air & Money

This past weekend I cleaned out some storage tubs that have been in my basement since I moved in.  Within these tubs and boxes were all of my notes from college, along with all of my text books.  Being any form of an engineering major means you keep all notes and books from college (I think).   Among them was the manual for my graphing calculator.  Even though I don’t graph anything on my calculator from college anymore, it still sits on my desk here and I use it to tell me how much money I am saving customers when they install our products.  Along with calculating which Cabinet Cooler System they need.

The truth is, I don’t even need the calculator on my desk when I am looking at how much money an EXAIR Electronic Flow Control can save a customer.  That’s because there is a free easy to use calculator right on our website.  This calculator is going to allow you to put in how much air you are using, the percent of time the unit is on, how much you paid for the EFC and the compressed air, then it gives you how much air and money you save.  The EFC Calculator will even tell you how many days it will take to recoup the price of the EFC.

opt_sakAPPillustr

Let’s look at an example of a 60″ Super Ion Air Knife that was installed to clean off bumper covers before a paint line.  Not only did the customer save money by using the Super Ion Air Knife rather than the drilled pipes, they saved additional air and money by turning the compressed air off when a bumper wasn’t present.   The following figures show the amount of money and air saved by implementing the EFC.

EFCp4

The Super Ion Air Knife was operated at 40 psig inlet pressure, this utilizes 102 SCFM of compressed air.

The process ran for 24 hours a day which equates to 1,440 minutes. There is a six second gap between each bumper, this means that you can reduce the on time by 37.5% just by turning the air off between bumpers.

The average cost to produce 1,000 SCF of compressed air is $0.25.  The calculator shows the results below which include the pay back time for the EFC purchase. (CLICK it for a larger image)

EFC Calc

As you can see, it will take a mere 84 days to reach a return on the investment of the EFC.  The chart below (CLICK to enlarge) shows the math and cost savings when you also account for the amount of air saved by using the Super Ion Air Knife.

efc_block

So if you have an intermittent compressed air application, by all means give us a call.   We’ll help you figure out how much you’ll save by installing the EFC.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF