Video Blog: How to Use the Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide

Selecting the proper Cabinet Cooler to solve your electrical panel overheating problems is simplified by using the Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guide and allowing EXAIR Application Engineers to calculate which Cabinet Cooler will be best. It is important to size Cabinet Coolers properly to ensure the most efficient cooler is chosen and the proper NEMA rating is chosen for your cabinet. This video illustrates how simple it is to gather the information for a long term solution to heat related problems.

Cabinet Coolers install in minutes, not hours. They protect your electronics from seasonal hot weather spikes, normally high temperature environments, or too much heat dissipation from electrical components in an enclosure. EXAIR’s selection of Cabinet Coolers include NEMA 12, 4 and 4X ratings. They normally operate with a thermostat control to turn themselves on and off as needed throughout the years and this is the most efficient way to run them. They are available from stock to solve your problem quickly and will fit nearly any environment with a variety of materials (Aluminum, 303 stainless steel or 316 stainless steel) and temperature ratings.

If you have any questions, please contact EXAIR.

Brian Bergmann
EXAIR Corporation
Ph. 1-800-903-9247 (U.S. & Canada)   1-513-671-3322
Email: brianbergmann@exair.com

 

What Is A NEMA Rating?

With the Summer heat upon us here in Ohio the inquiries for our Cabinet Cooler Systems are increasing by the day.  A question we always ask customers with Cabinet Cooler Sizing Guides is, “What NEMA Type is your enclosure?”  There are quite a few times where no one truly knows what a NEMA rating is. So what exactly is a NEMA rating?

NEMA is the National Electrical Manufacturers Association, one of the many standards they publish is the NEMA rating standard for electrical enclosures up to 1000 Volts.  This standard is where NEMA Types such as 12, 4, and 4X come from (you will also see an international standard reference as “IP”, more on that later).  It categorizes the enclosures by their ability to protect the internal components from things such as corrosion, dust, oil, even external air quality. These standards are reviewed every five years and the last review was done in 2013.  The reviews are generally based on improving safety, clarity of the standard, and testing methods.

So what NEMA ratings does EXAIR offer?  For our Cabinet Cooler Systems, EXAIR offers three very common NEMA types to try an offer a selection to fit the needs that we most commonly encounter.  The NEMA types and their descriptions are below.   For a full list of the Non-hazardous location NEMA enclosure types, click on this link.

EXAIR NEMA 12 Cabinet Cooler System w/ Side Mount Kit

Type 12 (IP54): General purpose, indoor use.  Protects against falling dirt and circulating dust, lint, fibers, and flyings.  Protects against ingress of dripping and splashing water. Rust-resistant Type 12 enclosures do not include knockouts.

 

EXAIR NEMA Type 4 Cabinet Cooler System
EXAIR NEMA Type 4 Cabinet Cooler System

Types 4, 4X (IP66): Water-tight, dust-tight, sleet-resistant.  Resistant to windblown dust.  Indoor or outdoor use.  Also provides protection against splashing and hose-directed water.  The “X” designation indicates corrosion-resistance.

EXAIR's High Temp Cabinet Cooler Systems

The EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems also reference an equivalent IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission), IP code.   This is a code from the IEC system which specifies the ingress protection which classifies and rates the degree of protection provided against intrusion (body parts such as hands and fingers), dust, accidental contact, and water by mechanical casings and electrical enclosures. They are a two digit number that represents the level of protection against physical objects and he ingress of water.   Coorelation between NEMA ratings and IP codes is not always possible.  EXAIR has ensured that we also meet the equivalent IP codes shown in the NEMA descriptions above.

If you have a hot enclosure and you are not sure how much cooling is needed or what the NEMA type is, contact us.  We will gladly help you gather the information needed to calculate the heat load requirements and help determine the correct NEMA rating.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer Manager
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

Heat Causes the Same Problems Worldwide

For us in the US, cold spells and static problems are rampant.  We have nor’easters hitting the East Coast and passing over the Midwest, blankets of cold, dry air, and a host of production processes that are effected by the seasonal temperature changes.

And, for the inches of snow in the Northern hemisphere, our Southern hemisphere counterparts are experiencing their summer heat waves.  Recently, I received a request from one of our Southern hemisphere distributors with a summer-specific overheating condition.

Devices Inside an Electrical Panel
Internal components of overheating enclosure

The problem was during the summer months, when ambient temperatures creep upward and spike occasionally, the electrical devices within the panel (shown above) would overheat.  The overheat condition would trip out the electronics and drives.  So, what did the end user do?

Current cooling solution for cabinet
On-site solution before implementing High Temperature Cabinet Cooler solution

They left the panel door open just a bit to vent the heat.  And, in doing so they allow anything in the surrounding area to enter the enclosure, posing risk to the sensitive electronics inside.

In this case, the root cause of the problem was traced to spiking ambient temperatures.  And with the spike in temperature, a normal Cabinet Cooler system was not going to be sufficient, so a High Temperature Cabinet Cooler system was recommended.  (High Temperature Cabinet Cooler systems can accommodate for increased ambient and compressed air temperatures.)

Although this application came from a country in the throes of summer, the same condition can be present in any facility.  If you have an enclosure with an overheat condition, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer for a solution.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

EXAIR Cabinet Cooler Systems Control Humidity While Maintaining Internal Temperature

As the weather in the Northern Hemisphere changes over from winter to spring and temperatures start to climb, it is slowly becoming necessary for customers to utilize the Cabinet Cooler Systems to keep control panels cool.

One such situation involved a customer who was building a panel for his client in Malaysia. Malaysia is about 3 degrees north of the Equator, so it is what I would call a semi-tropical if not tropical environment. And such places are quite high in humidity levels. This customer had a client who was in the palm oil processing industry which is quite big in Malaysia. He needed a Cabinet Cooler System to generate about 1000 Btu/hr. of cooling power in a NEMA 12 type system. So I recommended he go with a 1700 Btu/hr. Cabinet Cooler System so he had plenty of capacity. I also recommended he go with 24 VDC thermostat control so he could easily pull the power out from within his panel and not have to run any new circuits.

As the customer duly noted, the fact that the Cabinet Cooler System purges the cabinet with clean, cool and dry compressed air allows for the humidity levels to hang down at a much lower level around 40 – 50% RH instead of up around 80 – 90%. This is attributed to the processing and drying of the compressed air at the production point before it is sent out to the facility and again at the point of use with the included, 5 micron, compressed air filter/separator that comes with each system.

Previously, the customer was using only the small, DC type fans to pull that hot, humid air through the panel which led to many corrosion issues and did not relieve the heat issue at all. With this new improvement, the end user no longer has to worry about such issues. Also, there is virtually no maintenance for this system which produces much longer up-times for the customer as there are no moving parts to wear out. Overall, it was a good recommendation in this case as the Cabinet Cooler System was handling multiple, previously negative issues. Now the pain has been taken away and the end user can move on to solving other, more pressing problems.

Neal Raker, Application Engineer
nealraker@exair.com