Back Blow Air Nozzles Clean Inside Diameters

They say time flies when you’re having fun. Maybe that’s why I found it a little hard to believe it’s been almost two years since we introduced the Back Blow Air Nozzles. They’ve become yet another “textbook” solution to a great many applications:

*Model 1004SS M4 Back Blow Air Nozzles are used to dry the inside of a closed cylinder after a zinc bonding process.  They’re also fitted to Model 1204SS-12-CS M4 Back Blow Safety Air Gun to remove chips & cutting fluid from freshly cut pipe ends.

*Our Model 1006SS 1/4 NPT Back Blow Air Nozzle won Plant Engineering Magazine’s “Product Of The Year” Bronze Award in 2015, and are successfully employed in a wide range of uses:

  • Blowing out splined bores by a gear manufacturer
  • Quickly cleaning out spindles between tool changes by a CNC machinery operator
  • Removing the last bits of powder from spent toner cartridges by a printing equipment recycler

*The Model 1008SS 1 NPT Back Blow Air Nozzle is becoming famous in hydraulic cylinder repair shops…after a cylinder bore is honed, one quick pass of the powerful blast it produces cleans bores from 2″ to 16″.  We can even put it on the Model 1219SS Super Blast Back Blow Safety Air Gun, with a 1ft, 3ft, or 6ft extension.

EXAIR Back Blow Air Nozzles come in three sizes, for bores from 1/4″ to 16″ in diameter!

If you want to see how they work, check out this video:

I could have sworn Lee Evans just made that video, but apparently, it’s over a year old now.  Time does indeed fly, and I promise we’re having fun!  If you’d like to find out more about how a Back Blow Air Nozzle – or any of our engineered compressed air products (old or new) – can make your operations quieter, more efficient (and hence, probably, more fun,) give me a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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Cleaning A Cookie Cutter Die Using A 24″ 316SS Super Air Knife

I recently worked with a food manufacturer who was looking for a way to clean the die roller in their cookie cutting process.The cutting machine is fed by a ribbon of extruded dough that is cut into various shapes as it passes by a 24″ wide roller. After the cookies are cut, the finished product then travels down a chute to a feed tray where it is conveyed to a packaging area. They were starting to see an increase in rejects as some cookies were being “double stamped” as a result of residual dough sticking to the die. They tried to install a brush traveling the span of the roller in an effort to wipe it clean but this wasn’t very effective and also caused some contamination as some of the bristles would break loose. They then tried having an operator use an air gun to manually clean the roller and while this did work, it severely slowed the process down, reducing production and negatively affecting their bottom line.

That’s a lot of cookie cutters!

After discussing the details of the application, I recommended the customer use our 24″ 316ss Super Air Knife in the application. The Super Air Knife produces a laminar sheet of air across the length of the knife and consumes only 2.9 SCFM per inch of knife length when operated at 80 PSIG. The 316ss construction resists pitting and is the preferred choice when being applied to a food process as it minimizes the potential for metal contamination.

SS Super Air Knife available in lengths from 3″ up to 108″

When it comes to wide area treatment, an Air Knife is the optimal choice. If you have a similar application that requires assistance, please contact an Application Engineer at 1-800-903-9247.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

 

Largest collection of cookie cutters I’ve ever seen image courtesy of Steven-L-Johnson via Creative Commons license.

 

Back Blow Nozzle Improves Cylinder Testing Process

cylinder-drying
Drying rig used to clean fire extinguishers after pressure testing

A few weeks ago I made a video showing how the Back Blow Nozzle operates.  The video is helpful to illustrate the process of pipe cleaning, but this isn’t the only application for a Back Blow Nozzle.

I was recently contacted by a testing facility which provides inspection services for fire extinguishers.  As part of the inspection process, the empty fire extinguishers are pressure tested by filling the empty cylinders with water and raising the pressure to a specific PSI.  After passing this test, they are emptied, turned upside-down, and fed over a drying rig.  The drying rig (shown above) is a crude setup, using a brass tube with a few drilled holes.

In order to sufficiently dry the cylinders with this setup, they needed to be placed on the drying rig for long periods of time, sometimes for several minutes.  This long cycle time was a waste of compressed air, and the end user wanted to find a better, more efficient solution.

1006ss_3up_500
Model 1006SS, 1/4″ NPT Back Blow Nozzle

The solution was to replace the drilled pipe with a ¼” NPT Back Blow Nozzle, model 1006SS.  The angled orifices of this engineered nozzle force the air, and water in this case, from the cylinder.  There is no longer a need to leave the cylinders on the drying rig for several minutes – drying is now accomplished in a fraction of the initial time.  And, in addition to the improved cycle time, the engineered nozzle is able to reduce sound level from the drying rig.

Back Blow Nozzles can be used in a variety of applications.  If you have a process which you think could benefit from an engineered nozzle solution and you’d like to discuss with someone, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE