The Impressive ROI of an Engineered Air Nozzle

You may have asked…why should I switch over to an engineered air nozzle if my system already works? Or…How can air nozzles be much different?

Manufacturing has always been an advocate for cost savings, where they even have job positions solely focused on cost savings. Return on Investment (ROI) is a metric they look toward to help make good decisions for cost savings.  The term is used to determine the financial benefits associated with the use of more efficient products or processes compared to what you are currently using. This is like looking at your homes heating costs and then changing out to energy efficient windows and better insulation. The upfront cost might be high but the amount of money you will save over time is worth it.

Model 1100 Super Air Nozzles can save compressed air dollars and increase safety

But how is ROI calculated? It is very simple to calculate out your potential savings of using one of EXAIR’s Intelligent Engineered Compressed Air Products. If you would rather not do the calculations out yourself then we can do it for you by sending the item in question to our Efficiency Lab Testing. The Efficiency Lab Testing is a free service that we offer to show you the possible savings by switching to one of our products.

The following is a simple ROI  calculation for replacing open blowoffs with an EXAIR Super Air Nozzle:

  • ¼” Copper Pipe consumes 33 SCFM at 80 psig (denoted below as CP)
  • A Model 1100 ¼” Super Air Nozzle can be used to replace and only uses 14 SCFM at 80 psig (denoted below as EP)

Calculation:

(CP air consumption) * (60 min/hr) * (8 hr/day) * (5 days/week) * (52 weeks/year) = SCF used per year for Copper Pipe  

(33) * (60) * (8) * (5) * (52) = 4,118,400 SCF

(EP air consumption) * (60 min/hr) * (8 hr/day) * (5 days/week) * (52 weeks/year) = SCF used per year for EXAIR Product  

               (14) * (60) * (8) * (5) * (52) = 1,747,200 SCF

Air Savings:

SCF used per year for Copper Pipe – SCF used per year for EXAIR Product = SCF Savings

               4,118,400 SCF – 1,747,200 SCF = 2,371,200 SCF in savings

If you know the facilities cost to generate 1,000 SCF of compressed air you can calculate out how much this will cost you would save. If not, you can us $0.25 to generate 1,000 SCF which is the value used by the U.S. Department of Energy to estimate costs.

Yearly Savings:

                (SCF Saved) * (Cost / 1000 SCF) = Yearly Savings

                                (2,371,200 SCF) * ($0.25 / 1000 SCF) = $592.80 annual Savings

With the simple investment of $42 (as of date published) you can calculate out the time it will take to pay off the unit.

Time Until payoff:

                (Yearly Savings) / (5 days/week * 52 weeks/year) = Daily Savings

                                ($592.80/year) / (5 days/week * 52 weeks/year) = $2.28 per day

                (Cost of EXAIR Unit) / (Daily Savings) = Days until product has been paid off

                                ($42) / ($2.28/day) = 17.9 days  

As you can see it doesn’t have to take long for the nozzle to pay for itself, and then continue to contribute toward your bottom line. 

If you have any questions about compressed air systems or want more information on any of EXAIR’s products, give us a call, we have a team of Application Engineers ready to answer your questions and recommend a solution for your applications.

Cody Biehle
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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Process Improvement, ROI and Safety from One Air Nozzle

Process improvement projects can be detailed, complex, expensive, and take a long time to prove their worth.  Today, I want to tell you about one that WAS NOT ANYTHING like that.

A metal stamping company used compressed air to blow their products from their dies.  They did what many do – they ran some copper tubing, and aimed it at the platen so it would properly eject the parts as they were stamped.  They KNEW it was loud, and they suspected it was inefficient as well.

After discussing the setup and seeing a picture of it (the one on the left, below,) I recommended installing a few engineered Super Air Nozzles to lower the noise levels considerably.  Boy, was I wrong.  About “a few” nozzles, that is…turns out, they only needed one Model 1122-9212 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle with 12″ Stay Set Hose.  The copper tubes come from a manifold that already had 1/4 NPT ports – installation took a matter of minutes.  Nothing detailed, complex, or expensive about it:

This loud & inefficient copper tubing blowoff was just a compression fitting (and a Model 1122 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle) away from being quiet and efficient.

It didn’t take much longer than that to prove its worth either: as soon as they noticed how much the noise level went down on THIS press, they ordered them for the other eighteen presses in their facility as well.

The 1/4″ copper tubes blew continuously from a pressure regulator set @60psig…the three of them theoretically consumed a total of ~80 SCFM.  The Model 1122, at 60psig supply, consumes only 17.2 SCFM.  Simple return on investment was as follows:

  • 80 SCFM was costing them $48.00 a week
    • 80 SCFM X 60 min/hr X 8 hr/day X 5 days/week X $0.25/1,000 CFM = $48.00
  • 17.2 SCFM, using the same formula, only costs $10.32 a week (I’ll let you do the math; it’s good practice.)
  • They saved $37.68 a week.  The Model 1122-9212 costs $116.00 (2020 pricing) – that means that each of them paid for themselves in just a hair over three weeks.
  • $37.68 x 50 work weeks per year = $1884.00 saved annually per nozzle
  • $1884 x 18 (the number of presses) = $33,912 saved annually 

Considering they also didn’t have to listen to those very loud open ended copper tube blowoffs, I think you’ll have to agree it made for a very good investment.  They did. The new nozzle runs at 77 decibels, a comfortable level and well below the OSHA standard [29 CFR – 1910.95(a)] for allowable noise exposure.

If you’d like to find out how EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Products can save you money on compressed air – and save everyone’s hearing – give me a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
EXAIR Corporation
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