It is an Honor to be Nominated…

This year Plant Engineering has nominated (4) EXAIR products for their Product of the Year award.  Even though all of our products utilize compressed air, we are nominated in several different categories: fluid handling, electric controls, environmental health, and compressed air.  As a company, we stick to designing products that efficiently use compressed air, it’s our breadth of product line which affords us the opportunity to be nominated in numerous categories.

It is an honor to be nominated… winning would be further validation of everyone’s hard work around here.  We know it’s a team effort all around; from receiving in raw materials to machining and assembly to shipping quality product out the door on time. We rely on the talents of our sales and marketing teams and have come to count on our customer service folks to be the best in industry. Our engineers continue to design new products and expand product lines at an impressive speed and the accounting people help keep it all in check. If you are willing, please visit Plant Engineering’s Product of the Year website to view all of the nominees and vote for EXAIR products.  Below is a brief description of our nominated products and links to our website for more information.

We really got our start in designing safe, effective and efficient compressed air blow offs.  We continued that tradition this year by creating a 1″ Flat Super Air Nozzle, model 1126.  This nozzle produces a powerful 1″ wide air stream with 9.8 ounces of force 12″ away from the nozzle.  Because the air flow cannot be blocked, model 1126 meets OSHA standards 29 CFR – 1910.95(a) and 1910.242(b).  It also maintains a quiet 75 dBA, and uses 10.5 SCFM when supplied with an inlet pressure 80 PSIG.  Please vote for this product here.

Did you know that you can cool up to 5,600 Btu/hr with compressed air?  Our Cabinet Cooler Systems utilizes vortex tube technology to create cold air, which can be used to cool electrical panels.  This year we released a dual Cabinet Cooler System made of 316 stainless steel for wash down environments and NEMA 4X enclosures that need more than 2,800 BTU/Hr of cooling that a single cooler can provide.  Please vote for this product here.

In industrial environments, electrical vacuums do not hold up for very long.  EXAIR has been manufacturing industrial vacuums to replace the standard duty and electric vacuums for over a decade, but what do you do if the environment is very dusty with fine particulate? With EXAIR’s Heavy Duty HEPA Vac, we remove the danger of this fine particulate from being ingested or inhaled from the air with a HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filter that tested to IEST-RP-CC-007 HEPA standards.  The filters have a minimum of 99.97% filtration at the 0.3 micron level. Please vote for this product here.

Finally, we are nominated for a our No Drip Atomizing Spray Nozzle.  These nozzles are available in a variety spray patterns and flow rates.  The no-drip feature allows precise control of the amount of liquid used.  When precisely metering the liquid used in your coating process, the no-dip nozzle keeps up with your intermittent flow without forming a drip or a bubble to mar the uniform spray pattern that you need. Please vote for this product here.

Please take a look at these products and give EXAIR your vote.

Dave Woerner
Application Engineer
davewoerner@exair.com
@EXAIR_DW

Compressed Air Calculations, Optimization, and Tips

EXAIR uses our blog platform to communicate everything from new product announcements to personal interests to safe and efficient use of compressed air. We have recently passed our 5 year anniversary of posting blogs (hard for us to believe) and I thought it appropriate to share a few of the entries which explain some more of the technical aspects of compressed air.

Here is a good blog explaining EXAIR’s 6 steps to optimization, a useful process for improving your compressed air efficiency:


One of the Above 6 steps is to provide secondary storage, a receiver tank, to eliminate pressure drops from high use intermittent applications. This blog entry addresses how to size a receiver tank properly:

Here are 5 things everyone should know about compressed air, including how to calculate the cost of compressed air:

These next few entries address a common issue we regularly assist customers with, compressed air plumbing:

In a recent blog post we discuss how to improve the efficiency of your point of use applications:

Thanks for supporting our blog over the past 5 years, we appreciate it. If you need any support with your sustainability or safety initiatives, or with your compressed air applications please contact us.  

Have a great day,
Kirk Edwards
@EXAIR_KE

Improve Your Compressed Air System: Improve Point of Use Applications

While compressor controls and efficiency are an important part of any comprehensive compressed air audit, so too, are your point of use applications. Many times these point of use locations are quickly and inexpensively improved. The first step is to identify which area of your system you would like to improve first. Certainly you will have that “problem area”, the part of the plant you know is using compressed air more than it should. This area of your plant is usually outfitted with open tubes that have the ends crimped down as a homemade nozzle or the operators are using blow-guns with commercial grade nozzles or worse yet, no nozzle at all. It’s the area of the plant that may require hearing protection due to the loud hissing of air or where that pipe with drilled holes was the quickest and cheapest fix for the application (or so you thought).

Document these areas of the plant and address these points of use by measuring the current consumption. Many times, we find, the volume of air provided by open tubes, inefficient nozzles and drilled pipes is much more than is required for the application.  Accurate compressed air measurement will be important to properly calculate the compressed air cost and savings. These points of use can be retrofitted or optimized in a couple of ways. First, you can retrofit open tubes by placing a compression fitting and engineered air nozzle on it. This will both reduce the air consumption and noise levels within the plant. Drilled pipes have holes, or slots, along the length to provide a wide area blow off. These applications can show dramatic improvement by using compressed air knives or air amplifiers which are engineered to reduce air consumption, reduce noise and maintain OSHA Compliance for dead end pressure. The second way to improve these end use applications is to install pressure regulators and lower the end use pressure which will result in lower air use.

Don’t let these end use applications go unchallenged, just because they were this way when you joined the firm does not mean they should not, or cannot be improved upon. If you get the right folks involved and keep them updated about the actions or changes you are making, you will find advocates for the projects. Remember that quantifying the savings is key so don’t start without measuring how much air you are currently using at these problem areas. Flow meters on each leg of your system or at specific high use areas of the plant will prove invaluable to providing data expressed in dollars of savings to those making decisions within your firm. The compressed air supply side personnel will also be helpful in locating or prioritizing where to start saving compressed air. Keep employees and management informed of savings and improvements and the savings ball will have more potential to keep on rolling.

Remember:

  • Measure – baseline the current conditions of compressed air use with flow meters
  • Upgrade – retrofit inefficient open blow offs, commercial grade nozzles, drilled pipes etc. with engineered  and intelligent compressed air products
  • Control air pressure – lower pressure results in lower air consumption

If you would like any assistance or support to improve your compressed air system, we’re here to help.

Kirk Edwards
Application Engineer
@exair_ke