Happy Thanksgiving!

EXAIR is thankful for our customers (and potential customers), vendors and our superb team of folks who do amazing work! Thank you for your continued support and committment.

May you all get some time to relax and enjoy your friends and family.

EXAIR will be closed November 24 and 25 to celebrate Thanksgiving.

Thanks Again Everyone!

The EXAIR team

Maximum Effort!!! The Two Types of Vortex Tube Generators

I am a fan of just about all things MCU (Marvel Cinematic Universe) and have always found Deadpool to be entertaining. Anytime I see a Max Cold Temp or Max Refrigeration mention when discussing or reading about a Vortex Tube I go to a miniature cut scene where Deadpool is saying Maximum Effort as they are fighting the bad guys in Deadpool 2. Enough about my love for MCU, let’s get more into my nerd love for Vortex Tubes.

When it comes to Vortex Tubes and getting the most out of them, EXAIR are the subject matter experts. If you aren’t sure what a Vortex Tube is or how it works, we’ve blogged about that, today’s blog is going to focus more on why you would select a Maximum Cold Temp vs a Maximum Refrigeration Vortex Tube and what actually changes.

Vortex generator

The difference lies in the generator that is inside the Vortex Tube. The reason to choose between the two lies with the application for the tube. In the event that the tube will be used for spot cooling or cooling a small chamber, Maximum Refrigeration generators are desired because you will generally work at a 50% cold fraction or higher. The maximum refrigeration value possible is achieved under set variables such as operating pressure, cold fraction, and incoming compressed air temperature. To see how these effect the cooling performance, check out our blogs on de-rating a Vortex Tube (Part 1Part 2). The bulk of applications that I have worked on over the 10+ years I have been part of EXAIR utilize the Maximum Refrigeration Vortex Tube because customers desire to get a product, small area, or component below ambient air temperatures and are going to be operating in the 50% to 80% cold fraction area in order to provide the performance needed.

EXAIR Vortex Tube Performance Chart

The other small fraction of applications that really need to get the lowest air temperature; in order to get that small component or spot down to -50°F (-46°C) will utilize the Maximum Cold Temperature generators. These will be the 3400 series Vortex Tubes or the “-C” versions. While max cold temperature models are less common, they regularly solve applications for temperature stress testing parts and freeze seals. Maybe you aren’t sure if the Maximum Refrigeration or Maximum Cold Temp is the one you need. That’s where the Application Engineer Team here comes in, hit us up first, and then we can also showcase just how simple it is to change the generator in a Vortex Tube out and give an idea of how many turns out from closed on the Hot Valve you will be to get close to the performance needed.

It truly is just that simple, no internal moving parts, just change out one internal component, and adjust the Hot Valve. To understand how easy that is, check the video below and you can see how big of a swing one can see with adjustments.

Brian Farno
Application Engineer
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_BF

LIQUID ATOMIZING SPRAY NOZZLES – how they work and available options

EXAIR’s Liquid Atomizing Nozzles are some of the very few items that we make that do not use compressed air as the energy source. Instead, pressurized liquids provide the energy. Sometimes the nozzles will create an internal spinning liquid or the nozzle will cause the liquid to impact another surface. Each method , spinning or impacting, causes the liquid to lose its surface tension and atomize into small droplets. These nozzles can generate more liquid flow than our Air Atomizing Nozzles, which mix the liquid with air and produce the smallest droplet sizes. Depending on your liquid atomizing nozzle selection, you can spray anywhere from 0.48 gallons per minute, up to 17.64 gallons per minute.

This amount of liquid is typically used for cooling, rinsing, dust suppression and washing, but there are many other applications as well. These nozzles will work well with solution that have particulates in it, including slurries.

With a very small footprint, all stainless steel construction, and no moving parts, these are a great fit, for not only the easy to get to conveyors or containers, but also those hard to reach spots as well. Couple this with not needing air, and they are easy to plumb, and easy to use. They are made of 303 Stainless Steel and can accommodate temps up to 800°F.

Currently, we have 2 liquid nozzle types. One type is a FullStream Cone which comes in 1/4″, 3/8″ and 1/2″ NPT. The other type is a HollowStream Cone that comes in 1/4″ and 3/8″ NPT. With these nozzles, the fluid is supplied into the body creating a swirling action within the vortex chamber. This Vortex is what creates the cone pattern. Then the precision orifice of the nozzle breaks this surface tension, and it leaves the nozzle with a full circular pattern (FullSstream), or a hollow ring pattern (HollowStream).

With this information, we are now down to choosing the size we need. We offer performance tables, within our catalogue, or on the website, that will show you the following:

  1. Inlet Connection
  2. Nozzle Capacity
  3. Max Free Passage (Orifice size for particulate)
  4. Flow Rates in Gallons (or Litres) per minute bases on psi of liquid
  5. Spray width based upon the psi, and distance from the surface

Here is an example of the FullStream Cone Nozzles – 1/4″ NPT:

As you choose your Liquid Atomizing Nozzle, it all comes down to the type of spray you need and how much liquid you need to spray. Once you decide betwen FullStream or HollowStream Cone and you know the amount of liquid pressure you have (and can adjust too) and the amount of liquid you are wanting to spray, comes down to scouting the performance tables of the sizes we offer and selecting the perfect one for your application.

Thank you for stopping by,

Brian Wages

Application Engineer EXAIR Corporation
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6 Steps to Optimizing Compressed Air: Turn it Down!!!

TURN IT DOWN!!! My wife screamed at 6:00am the morning of our first NFL Sunday. As a lifelong Cincinnati Bengals fan, it’s been a tradition in our house for me to wake everyone up while blaring Guns N’ Roses “Welcome to the Jungle” first thing in the morning each and every week 1. After 13 years together you’d think she would be prepared for this by now, but I still get her every time.

You may also hear your maintenance manager screaming to turn it down while out in the shop. They’re not talking about music volume. They’re more concerned about the compressed air pressure you’re using.

In any application necessitating the use of compressed air, pressure should be controlled to minimize the air consumption at the point of use. Pressure regulators are available to control the air pressure within the system and throttle the appropriate supply of air to any pneumatic device. As the last of the six steps to optimizing your compressed air system, controlling air at the point of use can often be overlooked.

Pressure Regulators “dial in” performance to get the job done without using more air than necessary.

Pressure regulators utilize a control knob that is turned to either increase/decrease tension on a spring. The spring puts a load on the diaphragm which separates internal air pressure from the ambient pressure. Typically made of a flexible rubber material, these diaphragms react very quickly to changes in the air supply. By either increasing or decreasing the flow of air based on the load on the diaphragm, downstream pressure remains fairly constant.

While one advantage of a pressure regulator is certainly maintaining consistent pressure to your compressed air devices, using them to minimize your pressure can result in dramatic savings to your costs of compressed air. As pressure and flow are directly related, lowering the pressure supplied results in less compressed air usage. EXAIR recommends operating your Intelligent Compressed Air Products at the minimum pressure necessary to achieve a successful application. If you notice a desirable result at a pressure of 60 PSIG, or even less, there’s no need to run full line pressure. In-line point of use pressure regulators are the simplest and most reliable way to allow you to dial down to the pressure to any compressed air operated product.

When selecting a pressure regulator for your application, it’s critical that it is appropriately sized to supply adequate volume to the point of use devices downstream. Doing so, minimizes the risk of experiencing “droop”. Droop is a decrease in outlet pressure from the specified setting due to an increase in flow rate.  Droop occurs when the demand at the point of use exceeds the volume of air that the regulator can supply. By ensuring the pressure regulator is rated to deliver sufficient volume of air, you’ll reduce the chances of experiencing droop. EXAIR offers pressure regulators in kits along with many of our products, we’ve done the hard part for you and made sure they’re properly sized!

If you’re looking for ways to help lessen the demand on your compressor, EXAIR’s team of Application Engineers will be happy to help. Reach out to us via phone, chat, or e-mail and see for yourself just how easy it can be to start saving compressed air!

Tyler Daniel, CCASS

Application Engineer

E-mail: TylerDaniel@EXAIR.com

Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

YouTube. (2009). YouTube. Retrieved September 21, 2022, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1tj2zJ2Wvg.