The Strength of the 1” High Power Flat Super Air Nozzles

1″ Flat Super Air Nozzles

A casting company used a die casting process to make large aluminum panels. In their operation, a two-part die would clamp together and be filled with hot liquid aluminum. Once the panel was formed and cooled, the die would open to release the part. Before the next panel was die casted, they would use a home-made cart to cool and clean the dies. The cooling was done first by spraying water onto the surface, then compressed air was used to dry the dies. When they started to use their home-made cart in their process, they noticed that the air pressure would begin to drop in their facility. Other locations in the plant started having problems with their pneumatic equipment.   They were using too much compressed air during the drying period; so, they contacted EXAIR to see if we could help reduce the amount of compressed air to dry the dies.

To explain a little more about the home-made cart, it was made from a 1” square piece of tubing that was bent in a U-shape. The dimension of the cart was about 40” long and 24” high. Across the top was a piece of extruded aluminum spanning the two ends of the U-shape tubing. This portion of the cart would supply the water to the liquid nozzles. The liquid nozzles hung vertically down from the extruded aluminum at designated heights to target certain areas of the dies. The U-shaped square tubing was used to supply the compressed air to the blow-off nozzles. The compressed air inlets were welded onto each end of the 1” square tubing. Across the bottom of the cart, the 1” square tubing had 38 holes that were drilled and tapped to 1/8” NPT (19 tapped holes on each side). The blow-off nozzles were 1/8” pipes with the ends smashed (reference picture below). They were made to different lengths to get as close to the die for maximum blowing force. The entire home-made assembly was attached to a robotic fixture with a cam to move the large cart between the dies. In applications using “smashed” pipes, they are very easy and inexpensive to make. But, as this customer found out, they use way too much compressed air and they are not as effective in blowing-off or drying.

Part of cart with 1/8″ flattened pipe

The customer above was limited to modifications to the home-made cart. It was already configured with the robot features and cam to hit the targeted areas. So, I recommended the model HP1126, 1” High Power Flat Super Air Nozzle. It has a 1” wide air stream that is very similar to the flow pattern of the 1/8” smashed pipe. But unlike the smashed pipe design, the model HP1126 nozzle can accomplish so much more. One of the biggest differences is that the EXAIR nozzles use much less compressed air. (The initial reason for contacting EXAIR). With the engineered design of the nozzle, it can entrain large amounts of ambient air which means that less compressed air is required. For a 1/8” NPT smashed pipe, it can use close to 70 SCFM of air at 80 PSIG – each!

The model HP1126 only requires 17.5 SCFM at 80 PSIG. That is a difference of 52.5 SCFM per nozzle. With 38 nozzles being used on this home-made cart, that equates to a total savings of 1,995 SCFM of compressed air. By simply replacing the 1/8” smashed pipe to a model HP1126 with a shorter nipple, their facility was able to save much compressed air and maintain the pneumatic requirements in the other work areas.

The customer was extremely happy with the air savings, but they asked about the amount of force that the model HP1126 can supply. It was important in their process to remove any residual water from the dies. The reason for the blow-off pipes to be so close to the die was to try and increase the blowing force. The best way that I could explain to them was by using an example of a garden hose. (Reference a blog by Neal Raker “Sometimes Back Pressure is Good; Sometimes it is Bad“).  The garden hose is attached to a spigot outside your house. As you open the spigot to supply water through the hose, the water will flow out of the hose at a slow velocity; not very strong. When you place your thumb partially over the end of a garden hose, you restrict the flow and increase the force. Now, you can reach the second-floor windows of your house to clean. With a lack of restriction at the end of the pipes, the air pressure will drop quickly as it travels through the long square tube and through the 1/8” pipe extensions. By the time the compressed air reaches the blow-off site, the pressure is much lower; thus, reducing the effectiveness of removing the water.

The EXAIR nozzles work like your thumb on the hose. The usable pressure is increased at the HP1126 nozzle, instead of a point much further upstream. By increasing the pressure at the point-of-use, the effective velocity and force is much stronger. In addition to this, they can now move the nozzles away from the die surface; in case of any “hiccups” in moving the cart in and out of the dies and eliminating any marring of the surfaces.

Once they installed the 38 pieces of the model HP1126 nozzles onto their cart, the first thing that they noticed was the amount of noise reduction. The model HP1126 only has a noise level of 82 dBA at 80 PSIG, compared to a noise level of an open pipe which is over 100 dBA. By replacing the flattened nozzles with the EXAIR nozzles, this company was able to…
1. reduce air consumption
2. keep the other areas of the plant operating by conserving compressed air at this location
3. reduce the noise level and
4. increase the effective blowing force

If you find that by using your blow-off/drying system, your pneumatic machines under-perform, or the low-pressure alarms are triggered, or you have to turn on an auxiliary compressor, you should contact an Application Engineer at EXAIR to see if we can optimize your compressed air devices. These EXAIR engineered nozzles can remove many issues in your system as it did with the casting company above.

 John Ball
Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

Replacing Liquid Nozzles with Engineered Air Nozzles

I wrote a blog a few weeks ago about increasing efficiency with EXAIR Super Air Nozzles.  In the application for that blog we used engineered nozzles to place open pipes, resulting in an efficiency increased of ~65%.  This week’s installment of efficiency improvements boasts similar figures, but through the replacement of misused liquid nozzles rather than open pipe.

The image above shows a compressed air manifold with a number of nozzles.  BUT, the nozzles in this manifold are not compressed air nozzles, nor do they have any engineering for the maximization of compressed air consumption.  These are liquid nozzles, usually used for water rinsing.

In this application, the need was to blow off parts as they exit a shot blasting machine.  When the parts exit the shot blasting process they are covered in a light dust and the dust needs to be blown away.  So, the technicians on site constructed the manifold, finding the liquid nozzles on hand during the process.  They installed these nozzles, ramped up the system pressure to maintain adequate blow off, and considered it finished.

And, it was.  At least until one of our distributors was walking through the plant and noticed the setup.  They asked about compressed air consumption and confirmed the flow rate of 550 m³/hr. (~324 SCFM) at 5 BARG (~73 PSIG).

The end user was happy with the performance, but mentioned difficulty keeping the system pressure maintained when these nozzles were turned on.  So, our distributor helped them implement a solution of 1101SS Super Air Nozzles to replace these inappropriately installed liquid nozzles.

By implementing this solution, performance was maintained and system pressure was stabilized.  The system stabilization was achieved through a 61% reduction in compressed air consumption, which lessened the load on the compressed air system and allowed all components to operate at constant pressure.  Calculations for this solution are shown below.

Existing compressed air consumption:  550 m³/hr. (324 SCFM) @ 6 BARG (87 PSIG)

Compressed air consumption of (9) model 1101SS @ 5.5 BARG (80 PSIG):  214 m³/hr. (126 SCFM)

Total compressed air consumption of 1101SS Super Air Nozzles:

Air consumption of 1101SS nozzles compared to previous nozzles:

Engineered air nozzles saved this customer 61% of their compressed air, stabilized system pressure, improved performance of other devices tied to the compressed air system, and maintained the needed performance of the previous solution.  If you have a similar application or would like to know more about engineered compressed air solutions, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

What Makes A Compressed Air System “Complete”?

It’s a good question.  When do you know that your compressed air system is complete?  And, really, when do you know, with confidence, that it is ready for use?

A typical compressed air system. Image courtesy of Compressed Air Challenge.

Any compressed air system has the basic components shown above.  A compressed air source, a receiver, dryer, filter, and end points of use.   But, what do all these terms mean?

A compressor or compressed air source, is just as it sounds.  It is the device which supplies air (or another gas) at an increased pressure.  This increase in pressure is accomplished through a reduction in volume, and this conversion is achieved through compressing the air.  So, the compressor, well, compresses (the air).

A control receiver (wet receiver) is the storage vessel or tank placed immediately after the compressor.  This tank is referred to as a “wet” receiver because the air has not yet been dried, thus it is “wet”.  This tank helps to cool the compressed air by having a large surface area, and reduces pulsations in the compressed air flow which occur naturally.

The dryer, like the compressor, is just as the name implies.  This device dries the compressed air, removing liquid from the compressed air system.  Prior to this device the air is full of moisture which can damage downstream components and devices.  After drying, the air is almost ready for use.

To be truly ready for use, the compressed air must also be clean.  Dirt and particulates must be removed from the compressed air so that they do not cause damage to the system and the devices which connect to the system.  This task is accomplished through the filter, after which the system is almost ready for use.

To really be ready for use, the system must have a continuous system pressure and flow.  End-use devices are specified to perform with a required compressed air supply, and when this supply is compromised, performance is as well.  This is where the dry receiver comes into play.  The dry receiver is provides pneumatic capacitance for the system, alleviating pressure changes with varying demand loads.  The dry receiver helps to maintain constant pressure and flow.

In addition to this, the diagram above shows an optional device – a pressure/flow control valve.  A flow control valve will regulate the volume (flow) of compressed air in a system in response to changes in flow (or pressure).  These devices further stabilize the compressed air system, providing increased reliability in the supply of compressed air for end user devices.

Now, at long last, the system is ready for use.  But, what will it do?  What are the points of use?

Points of use in a compressed air system are referred to by their end use.  These are the components around which the entire system is built.  This can be a pneumatic drill, an impact wrench, a blow off nozzle, a pneumatic pump, or any other device which requires compressed air to operate.

If your end use devices are for coating, cleaning, cooling, conveying or static elimination, EXAIR Application Engineers can help with engineered solutions to maximize the efficiency and use of your compressed air.  After placing so much effort into creating a proper system, having engineered solutions is a must.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

Increasing Efficiency With EXAIR Super Air Nozzles

Earlier this morning I received a phone call from a gentleman in search of a more efficient compressed air solution.  The application was to remove thermoformed plastics from a mold immediately after the mold separates.  In the current state, the application is consuming ~40% of the available compressed air in the facility through the use of (9) ¼” open pipes, consuming a confirmed 288 SCFM at 60 PSIG.  Due to the use of an open pipe, this customer was facing a safety and noise concern through the existing solution.

After discussing the application need and the desire to reduce compressed air use, reduce noise, and add safety, we found a suitable solution in the 1101 Super Air NozzleInstalling (9) of these EXAIR nozzles will reduce the compressed air consumption by over 65%!!!  Calculations for this savings are below.

Existing compressed air consumption:  288 SCFM @ 60 PSIG

Compressed air consumption of model 1101 @ 60 PSIG:  11 SCFM

Total compressed air consumption of  (9) 1101 nozzles:

Air savings:

This is the percentage of air which the new EXAIR solution will consume.  To put it another way, for every 100 SCFM the current solution consumes, the EXAIR solution will only require 34.38 SCFM. Installing these EXAIR nozzles will result in lower operational cost, lower noise levels, and increased safety for this customer – all while maintaining or improving the performance of the blow off solution in this application.

EXAIR Application Engineers are well versed in maximizing efficiency of compressed air systems and blow off needs.  If you have an application with a similar need, contact an EXAIR Application Engineer.  We’ll be happy to help.

Lee Evans
Application Engineer
LeeEvans@EXAIR.com
@EXAIR_LE

2” Flat Super Air Nozzles Separate Sheets of Metal Film

Heat Exchanger plates

An overseas company manufactures brazed plate heat exchangers. This type of heat exchanger has a series of corrugated plates that are stacked onto each other. It is designed to create a turbulent flow for better heat transfer in a very compact size. The plates inside the heat exchanger are made of 321 stainless steel which is basically a 304 type of stainless steel but with a titanium stabilizer. This company would receive plain sheets of stainless steel material that were stacked on each other in a column. The dimensions of the plates were as follows: 305mm wide by 520mm long with a thickness of 0.5mm (12” Wide X 20.5” Long X 0.02” thick respectively). Each sheet weighed 635 grams (1.4 lbs.). They would set a stack of the stainless-steel sheets at the beginning of a press machine. The press machine would form the corrugated design into the face of the sheet. They were using a pick-and-place vacuum system to lift one sheet at a time to place inside the press. They started having problems with their process when occasionally two or three sheets would stick together. The underlying sheet could either fall onto the floor which would bend the sheet or be stacked inside the press which would cause an improper corrugation. Both issues were causing much scrap as well as downtime in their process .

They contacted EXAIR to find a way to improve the efficiency of their process. They wondered if static could be causing the “sticking” issues. Generally, static forces are really noticed with sheets made of plastic or non-conductive materials. The stronger the static force, the more issues with sticking and misalignment. EXAIR does offer Static Eliminators to remove static forces in applications just like this. But, with plain metal sheets, static is not a problem as the ions are able to balance themselves.

Typically, the main cause for metal sheets to “stick” together is surface tension. Liquid like water has a strong affinity to itself within the molecular structure, called cohesion, and to the surface that it lies on, called adhesion. The cohesion plus the adhesion to the metal surface can have a strong enough force to overcome the weight of the sheets. To break the surface tension, an additional force is required.  An example of surface tension is with nylon tent material. The surface tension of water is strong enough to keep rain drops from penetrating the fabric. If you break the surface tension by touching the tent material, the surface will start to leak water. The same goes for the thin sheets of metal. We just need to break the surface tension to allow the sheets to separate.

2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle

I recommended two pieces of the model 1122, 2” Flat Super Air Nozzles. This nozzle gives a flat air pattern to force air between the sheets. Surface tension is based on force over length. Once the sheets start to separate, the contact length will decrease thus reducing the “sticking” force caused by surface tension. In this application, the amount of cohesion and adhesion forces caused by surface tension were unknown. Oil, water, and other liquids have different surface tensions which would require different amounts of blowing forces. To ensure the proper amount to separate the sheets, I recommended the shim set, model 1132SS.

The shims have different thicknesses that can be installed easily into the 2” Flat Super Air Nozzle to change the amount of blowing force.  In conjunction with a regulator, this customer could “dial” in the proper amount of force required to counteract the surface tension from any type of liquid that may be on the surface of the sheets.  I had them mount one nozzle at two different corners to help “peel” the sheets apart. The customer also tied in a solenoid valve into the compressed air system to cycle on the 2” Flat Super Air Nozzles only during the time when the vacuum system wanted to grab the top sheet. This reduced the amount of compressed air needed for their operation.  After the installation, the procedure ran smoothly without downtime and scrap waste.

If your application is creating scrap and downtime caused by sheets sticking together, EXAIR has many types of products to help eliminate this. Whether the “stickiness” is caused from static or liquid adhesion, an Application Engineer can direct you to the best product to eliminate the “stickiness”. For the overseas company above, we were able to apply a sharp flat burst of air to overcome the surface tension between the sheets.

John Ball
International Application Engineer
Email: johnball@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_jb

 

Heat Exchanger Plates by epicbeerCreative Common by 2.0

 

Engineered Air Nozzles and Jets Outperform – Save Air, Increase Safety, Save Money

EXAIR’s Engineered Air Nozzles and Air Jets provide a simple solution to lower compressed air usage and reduce noise levels for compressed air blowoff operations.

Why Air Nozzles and Jets – When compared to commonly used open copper tubes or pipes, compressed air savings can be as high as 80%. And with less compressed air, sound levels are greatly reduced.  A 10 dBA noise level reduction is typical.  All EXAIR Air Nozzles and Jets meet the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) maximum dead end pressure and sound level exposure requirements. They also carry the CE mark.

nozzlescascade2016cat29_559
The largest selection of engineered Air Nozzle sizes and materials are only available form EXAIR 

EXAIR Nozzles are engineered to take advantage of the Coanda effect to amplify the airflow up to 25 times or more. Compressed air is ejected through the small orifices and surrounding air is entrained into the main stream. The resulting air stream is a high volume, high velocity blast of air at minimal consumption.  EXAIR manufactures many styles, from the very small, but powerful Atto Super Air Nozzles, to the largest 1-1/4 NPT Super Air Nozzle.  Also offered are 1″ and 2″ wide Flat Super Air Nozzles, and the Back Blow style for cleaning out tubes, pipes, channels or holes from 1/4″ to 16″ in diameter.
EXAIR Air Jets utilize the Coanda effect (wall attachment of a high velocity fluid) to produce air motion in their surroundings.  A small amount of compressed air (1) is throttled through an internal ring nozzle above sonic velocity.  A vacuum is produced, pulling in large volumes of surrounding, or ‘free’ air, through an around the jet (2).  The exit flow is the combination of the two air sources (3).

air-jet
How an Air Jet Works

EXAIR manufactures Air Jets in two types, High Velocity, and Adjustable with materials of construction of brass and Type 303 Stainless Steel.  The High Velocity Air Jet uses a changeable shim to set the gap, controlling the force and flow of the air.  The Adjustable does not use a shim, and has a micrometer gap indicator and locking ring to allow for varying force and flow performance.

AirJetFamily
EXAIR Air Jets – High Velocity type on the left, Adjustable type on the Right

If you have questions about Air Nozzles and Jets, or would like to talk about any EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air® Product, feel free to contact EXAIR and myself or one of our Application Engineers can help you determine the best solution.

Brian Bergmann
Application Engineer

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Back Blow Air Nozzles Clean Inside Diameters

They say time flies when you’re having fun. Maybe that’s why I found it a little hard to believe it’s been almost two years since we introduced the Back Blow Air Nozzles. They’ve become yet another “textbook” solution to a great many applications:

*Model 1004SS M4 Back Blow Air Nozzles are used to dry the inside of a closed cylinder after a zinc bonding process.  They’re also fitted to Model 1204SS-12-CS M4 Back Blow Safety Air Gun to remove chips & cutting fluid from freshly cut pipe ends.

*Our Model 1006SS 1/4 NPT Back Blow Air Nozzle won Plant Engineering Magazine’s “Product Of The Year” Bronze Award in 2015, and are successfully employed in a wide range of uses:

  • Blowing out splined bores by a gear manufacturer
  • Quickly cleaning out spindles between tool changes by a CNC machinery operator
  • Removing the last bits of powder from spent toner cartridges by a printing equipment recycler

*The Model 1008SS 1 NPT Back Blow Air Nozzle is becoming famous in hydraulic cylinder repair shops…after a cylinder bore is honed, one quick pass of the powerful blast it produces cleans bores from 2″ to 16″.  We can even put it on the Model 1219SS Super Blast Back Blow Safety Air Gun, with a 1ft, 3ft, or 6ft extension.

EXAIR Back Blow Air Nozzles come in three sizes, for bores from 1/4″ to 16″ in diameter!

If you want to see how they work, check out this video:

I could have sworn Lee Evans just made that video, but apparently, it’s over a year old now.  Time does indeed fly, and I promise we’re having fun!  If you’d like to find out more about how a Back Blow Air Nozzle – or any of our engineered compressed air products (old or new) – can make your operations quieter, more efficient (and hence, probably, more fun,) give me a call.

Russ Bowman
Application Engineer
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