Video Blog: With EXAIR Products, Engineering Maximizes Efficiency

This video blog showcases just why engineering even the small details of a compressed air product can have a large impact on compressed air savings, safety, and efficiency.  This is why it is critical to know whether the company you are dealing with originally designed the product you purchased or if it is merely a copy.

 

 

Brian Farno
Application Engineer Manager
BrianFarno@EXAIR.com @EXAIR_BF

1″ Flat Super Air Nozzle Makes Clean Sweep Of Greasy Chain

A manufacturer of lubrication equipment had a messy problem to solve with a customized system they were designing, to apply grease to a drive chain.  They wanted to clean excess grease off the chain and deposit it into a reclaiming chamber, both to keep the area clean, and to prevent waste.  And because of the corrosive nature of the environment, it had to be stainless steel.  This was a “textbook” application for our Model 1126SS 1″ 316SS Flat Super Air Nozzle.

 

EXAIR’s 1″ Flat Super Air Nozzle is available in Zinc Aluminum or 316SS Construction. The replaceable shim makes it one of our most versatile products.

They also needed to lock it into position, once the exact angle of the air flow was determined, so they incorporated a Model 9052 1/8 NPT SS Swivel Fitting into their design.

When supplied with a Swivel Fitting, the 1″ Flat Super Air Nozzle can be precisely aimed for the most exacting applications.

Now the chain is clean, the grease is reclaimed, and the simplicity of the operation drew a lot of positive attention from the client.

I’ve written about this before, but it bears repeating…EXAIR Corporation’s plan for success is centered on being easy to do business with.  This was a situation where every facet of the project was impacted by our commitment to that goal:

*The customer and I determined the correct product to try in just a few minutes on the phone.

*The order shipped out, same day.

*The attention to detail that Engineering and Production put into the development of this product became evident in the ease of installation and operation.

From the moment you contact EXAIR, to the moment you achieve success in your application, it’s our job to make sure you get the most out of our products. If you have a job that you think one of our products might be a good fit for, give me a call.

What Is The Difference Between Pressure & Flow In A Compressed Air System?

There is rarely a day that goes by that I don’t receive a call from someone who has a need for a compressed air product and when I state the SCFM requirements of the device they respond back with the psi rating of their air compressor.  Many technicians simply do not understand the difference between the two.  Simply put psi (pounds square inch) is force and CFM (cubic feet per minute) is flow.

A simple illustration would be to contrast a 12 VDC powered air compressor that many people carry in their trunks to inflate car tires.  They will inflate your car tire to 35 psi in a matter of minutes.  While the air compressor at a tire shop can inflate a car tire in a minute or less.  What is the difference?

12 VDC Air Compressor
12 VDC Tire Inflator

 

Simply put, the flow. Both inflate the tire to the desired pressure but the one with largest flow (volume) does it much faster.  In the case of a compressed air product such as an air nozzle, the pressure required to operate is only one part of what is necessary to operate the device effectively, you need to have enough flow or CFM.

Let us now consider an EXAIR 1100 Super Air Nozzle, its rated performance of 13 ounces of force at 12″ distance from the nozzle is derived from supplying 14 SCFM @ 80 psi.  The typical home use air compressor that runs on 110 VAC (Generally 2 HP maximum) will not generate the flow (volume /CFM) at 80 psi to run the nozzle at peak force, just as it would not generate enough flow to fill the tire as quickly as the industrial compressor at a tire shop.

When an open tube, pipe or inefficient nozzle is placed at the end of an air line to provide blow off for cooling or cleaning it demands much greater volume from the compressor. If the compressor cannot keep up the force (pressure) of the system will decline. Replacing an open tube or pipe with an EXAIR engineered nozzle will require less compressed air volume which, in turn, will give the compressor more ability to provide full pressure and force upon your application.

1100group
EXAIR 1100 Super Air Nozzle

If you would like to discuss air consumption of any of EXAIR’s engineered solutions, I would enjoy hearing from you…give me a call.

Steve Harrison
Application Engineer
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12 VDC Tire Inflator Image courtesy of Moto Service Dinamarca

 

EXAIR’s Swivel Fittings Provide Precise Blowoff Positioning

swivel_extrusionblow_PRgrey_800pSQ
EXAIR’s smaller Swivel Fittings for the Atto, Pico, and Nano Super Air Nozzles

Are you tired of having to scrounge around the production floor for the right fittings to precisely position your air nozzle? Not only is it a pain to try and find the correct fittings, extensions, etc. but once you do the position of the nozzle is hard to adjust. To alleviate this problem, EXAIR has designed a variety of different sized swivel fittings that allow you to precisely position the nozzle, then easily tighten and lock into place.

swivel comparison
Don’t waste time using various pipe fittings to position your nozzle, use an EXAIR Swivel Fitting

EXAIR’s Swivel Fittings are available in 9 different sizes, from as small as 1/8” NPT male x M4 x .5mm female and up to 1” NPT male x 1” NPT female. The smaller swivels (M4-M6) are constructed of 316 stainless steel and the swivels ranging from 1/8 NPT – 1” NPT are available in 303 stainless steel. The Swivel Fittings allow for movement of 25 degrees from the center axis for a total movement of 50 degrees. This permits correct placement of the blowing angle, helping to optimize the performance of your blowoff process. With no gaskets or seals to wear out, there’s no maintenance required to maintain optimum performance.

Swivel Fittings

Swivels can be used on any of our Air Nozzles up to 1” and can also be used with the Adjustable and Super Air Amplifiers. By simply adding a “W” suffix to the part number, the correctly sized swivel fitting will be added to your order. For example, an 1122W would be one of our 2” Flat Super Air Nozzles with a ¼ NPT male x ¼ NPT female Swivel Fitting included. Stop wasting time trying to find the proper fittings and positioning for your blowoff nozzles! Contact an Application Engineer and get some of EXAIR’s Swivel Fittings on order today, available from stock.

Tyler Daniel
Application Engineer
E-mail: TylerDaniel@exair.com
Twitter: @EXAIR_TD

Replacing a 1/4″ Open Copper Tube With a 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle Leads To Quick ROI

The generation of compressed air accounts for approximately 1/3 of all energy costs in an industrial facility and up to 30% of that compressed air is wasted through inefficient operation. Open pipes or homemade blowoffs waste a ton of compressed air, resulting in high operating costs. By replacing these devices with an energy efficient, engineered solution, you can reduce this waste and dramatically cut energy costs.

For example, let’s look at the average operating costs for a single 1/4″ open copper tube. (If you don’t know you current energy costs, a reasonable average to use is $ 0.25 per every 1,000 SCF used, based on $ 0.08/kWh.

1/4″ Copper tube

A single 1/4″ open copper tube consumes 33 SCFM @ 80 PSIG and costs roughly $ 0.50 per hour to operate. (33 SCF x 60 minutes x $ 0.25 / 1,000 = $ 0.50). For an 8 hour shift, the total cost would be $ 4.00 ($ 0.50 x 8 hours = $ 4.00).

If we were to replace the 1/4″ open copper tube with our Model # 1122 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle with 1/4″ FNPT inlet, the air consumption would be reduced to 21.8 SCFM @ 80 PSIG. This may not seem like much of an air usage reduction, but when you look at the monetary, total cost of ownership for purchasing and operating the nozzle, the savings can quickly add up.

2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle

The operating cost for a 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle with 1/4″ FNPT inlet is $ 0.33 per hour (21.8 SCF x 60 minutes x $ 0.25 / 1,000 = $ .033) or $ 2.64 per 8 hour shift ($ 0.33 x 8 hours = $ 2.64).

We can now compare the operational cost between the 2 devices:

1/4″ open copper tube operating costs:
$ 0.50 per hour
$ 4.00 per day (8 hours)

2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle operating costs:
$ 0.33 per hour
$ 2.64 per day (8 hours)

Cost Savings:
$ 4.00 / day (open copper tube) –  $ 2.64 / day (2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle) = $ 1.36 savings per day

The Model # 1122 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle has a list price $ 67.00 USD.

ROI or Return On Investment calculation:
$ 67.00 (Cost) / $ 1.36 (savings per day) = 49.26 days.

The 2″ Flat Super Air Nozzle would pay for itself in just over 49 days in operation. This is the savings for replacing just ONE 1/4″ open copper tube with an engineered solution! In most industrial plants, there could be several of these which presents even more opportunities to reduce the overall operational costs.

Our focus here at EXAIR is to improve the overall efficiency of industrial compressed air operating processes and point of use compressed air operated products. If you are looking to reduce compressed air usage in your facility, contact an application engineer and let us help you optimize your current system.

Justin Nicholl
Application Engineer
justinnicholl@exair.com
@EXAIR_JN

Fluidics, Boundary Layers, And Engineered Compressed Air Products

Fluidics is an interesting discipline of physics.  Air, in particular, can be made to behave quite peculiarly by flowing it across a solid surface.  Consider the EXAIR Standard and Full Flow Air Knives:

Compressed air flows through the inlet (1) to the Full Flow (left) or Standard (right) Air Knife, into the internal plenum. It then discharges through a thin gap (2), adhering to the Coanda profile (3) which directs it down the face of the Air Knife. The precision engineered & finished surfaces serve to optimize the entrainment of air (4) from the surrounding environment.

If you’ve ever used a leaf blower, or rolled down the car window while traveling at highway speed, you’re familiar with the power of a high velocity air flow.  Now consider that the Coanda effect can cause such a drastic redirection of this kind of air flow, and that’s a prime example of just how interesting the science of fluidics can be.

EXAIR Air Amplifiers, Air Wipes, and Super Air Nozzles also employ the Coanda effect to entrain air, and the Super Air Knife employs similar precision engineered surfaces to optimize entrainment, resulting in a 40:1 amplification ratio:

EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Products such as (left to right) the Air Wipe, Super Air Knife, Super Air Nozzle, and Air Amplifier are engineered to entrain enormous amounts of air from the surrounding environment.

As fascinating as all that is, the entrainment of air that these products employ contributes to another principle of fluidics: the creation of a boundary layer.  In addition to the Coanda effect causing the fluid to follow the path of the surface it’s flowing past, the flow is also affected in direct proportion to its velocity, and inversely by its viscosity, in the formation of a boundary layer.

High velocity, low viscosity fluids (like air) are prone to develop a more laminar boundary layer, as depicted on the left.

This laminar, lower velocity boundary layer travels with the primary air stream as it discharges from the EXAIR products shown above.  In addition to amplifying the total developed flow, it also serves to attenuate the sound level of the higher velocity primary air stream.  This makes EXAIR Intelligent Compressed Air Products not only as efficient as possible in regard to their use of compressed air, but as quiet as possible as well.

If you’d like to find out more about how the science behind our products can improve your air consumption, give me a call.

Protect Personnel from Noise with Engineered Products

Sound can be defined as vibrations that typically travel as an audible wave through mediums that can be a gas, liquid or solid. For this blog we will concern ourselves with sound travelling through a gas (atmosphere) in an industrial setting.

Sound is energy that travels in waves and is measured by its frequency (cycles per second) and amplitude (intensity). A common unit of measurement for sound energy is the decibel. The decibel (abbreviated with dBA) is a unit-less number that is based on the logarithm of a known measured quantity to a reference quantity. Without reciting the equation for every increase of 3 dBA is a doubling of sound energy or twice as loud.

Since our focus is on industrial sound one might question why be concerned at all, after all sound emanates from most machines and devices. The reason for concern is that there are OSHA regulations regarding the amount of time workers can be exposed to different levels of sound in their workday as illustrated below. These limits are in place to protect personnel from Noise Induced Hearing Loss or NIHL. When the damage to anyones hearing is caused by their profession, it is also referred to as Occupational Hearing Loss or OHL.

After monitoring for noise, NIOSH and the CDC next recommend administrative controls to minimize or eliminate the noise hazard (click for their helpful PDF). This would include the use of noise reducing EXAIR products like Super Air Nozzles, Air Knives and Air Amplifiers.

dBA Chart.JPG
OSHA Maximum Allowable Noise Exposure

When considering the many items in an industrial setting that produce loud sounds the list would be exhaustive. Many of them simply produce loud sounds that can’t be eliminated or reduced while on the other hand there are some that can. Some of the noisiest offenders that plants have control over are air powered tools and open tube blow-offs.  Eliminating inefficient methods of part blow off & part cleaning with an engineered solution allows a company to significantly reduce the level of sound in their plant, improve worker safety and save money on compressed air consumption.

Employers are required to provide hearing protection to employees whom are exposed to sounds above 90 dBA on a Time Weighted Average (TWA). Without digressing into the formulas TWA calculates a workers daily exposure to occupational sounds by taking into account the average levels (in dBA) and the time exposed to different levels.  This is the how OSHA assesses workers exposure and what steps should be taken to protect the workers.

To conclude, plants need to be mindful of the OSHA regulations for sound levels, time of exposure and that hearing protectors wear out. Earmuff seals can lose their elasticity and reduce their effectiveness and the soft pre-molded earplugs can wear out in a day and need replaced.  Keep a good supply on hand and OSHA suggests letting workers with noisy hobbies take them home for protection off the clock!

If you would like to discuss reducing noise or any EXAIR product, I would enjoy hearing from you…give me a call.

Steve Harrison
Application Engineer

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